MTN unveils its first OTT service and roadmap for digital fortunes

MTN has announced the acquisition of music streaming platform Simfy at AfricaCom and outlined the future of the telco, which doesn’t look very much like a telco anymore.

This is of course a slightly unfair statement, as the mission of connecting the unconnected millions across Africa will continue to be a top priority for the business, though CEO Rob Shuter highlighted the team have much bigger ambitions when it comes to maintaining relevance in the digital economy. The Simfy acquisition is just one step in the quest to morph MTN into a digital services business.

Speaking during the keynote sessions at AfricaCom, Shuter highlighted there are still major challenges when it comes to connectivity in Africa, though telcos need to look deeper into how these challenges can be solved. The most simple roadblock is a lack of connectivity across the continent, but when networks are being deployed, telcos need to understand how consumers are engaging with the connected world. A good place to look first and foremost is China.

“Our mission is not just about connecting people, but understanding what the users want to use the internet for, so we can build networks properly,” said Shuter. “When we look at China today, that will be Africa in the next two to three years.”

Looking at how consumers use connectivity in China starts to paint a picture. Media takes up 17% of time of devices, while communications and social media takes up 33%. Shopping and payments account for 16%, and gaming takes up 11%. For MTN to be relevant in the future, Shuter has ambitions to create a presence in each of these segments.

To capitalise on payments and shopping, the mobile money offering will be revamped and launched in South Africa during Q1 2019. Nigeria has also just changed its regulatory regime when it comes to mobile money, and Shuter said the team would be applying for a payments service license over the next month, with plans to launch a mobile money offering in Q2 2019. This is a big moment for MTN, as while the mobile money offering has been present for some time, this is the first venture into its two largest markets.

For Shuter, creating a digital services company has two components. Using connectivity as a platform, a comprehensive partnerships programme has been launched in four main verticals (communications, rich media services, mobile financial services and eCommerce) with the team working with various established players in the ecosystem, but MTN also have to push itself further up the value chain and offer its own competitive products. This is where Simfy fits in.

As a music subscription product, customers will be able to merge both connectivity and music payments onto the same bill, but Simfy will not be incorporated into the greater MTN business from an operational perspective. Simfy will continue to operate a separate entity, allowing it to maintain the OTT environment. Shuter highlighted he would not want the corporate and operational structure of a telco, completely unsuited to the OTT landscape, to impact Simfy’s operations.

On the financial services side, the team will make use of MTN’s scale to establish a more prominent footprint. With a user base of 24 million already, this number seems to be doubling every 18 months. The significantly larger mobile subscription base can be used to springboard the mobile money business north, as Shuter highlighted the distribution network is key. When customers come to top-up their airtime or data allowance, they can also deposit cash into digital wallets. It is convergence at its finest, though leaning on Orange’s ambitions to diversify out of the traditional telco playground.

There are still huge challenges from a connectivity perspective across the African continent, but MTN seems to recognise there is more to be excited about than simply collecting subscriptions. If the Simfy acquisition is to be taken as evidence of MTN’s future roadmap, this looks like it could be a case of convergence done right, not allowing the cumbersome, archaic telco machine to muddy the OTT waters.

Telco competitors aren’t other telcos anymore

It might seem like an unusual statement to make, but if the fortunes of the fourth industrial revolution are going to be realised, telcos need to stop bickering between themselves.

The new competitive landscape seems like a very counter-intuitive one. The status quo for years has been to capture as many subscriptions as possible, building profits on top of connectivity, though the digital economy is so much more. This might seem like a very obvious statement to make, though the dangers are seemingly more apparent on the African continent, with the OTTs and cloud players a larger threat to a telco than other telcos.

This was a fear which emerged during the opening panel sessions at the AfricaCom 2018 show in Cape Town. Connectivity is not enough, especially on a continent where ARPU can be as low as $4 a month. There is of course demand for more data connectivity, but where is the value when you actually deploy data networks? According to Hind Elbashir, Group Chief Strategy Officer at Sudetal, not in the connectivity business.

“The OTTs have spread their wings, while we are continuing to compete in a very small place,” said Elbashir.

While the telcos are laying the foundations for the digital economy in Africa, they are continuing to focus efforts on traditional business models focused around connectivity and subscriptions. This is a limited section of the value chain, becoming increasingly crowded, and built on the race to the bottom. Value will become increasingly difficult to find and profitability will erode as the telcos fight for customers on pricing. However, the fourth industrial revolution is creating value elsewhere in the ecosystem.

Nic Rudnick, CEO of Liquid Telecom, echoed Elbashir’s point. While the African telcos are building the networks and spending all their time on securing more subscriptions, foreign players in Silicon Valley or China are swooping in to collect the more lucrative rewards at the top of the digital value chain. The OTTs are capitalising on the vast expenditures outlaid by the telcos and stealing the new value which is being created through enhanced connectivity.

But why is this more of a risk in Africa than anywhere else? That is a very simple question to answer; Africa does not have anywhere near the same scale or penetration of connectivity infrastructure as in the developed markets, while ARPUs are significantly lower, adding more pressure to the bottom line. With African telcos having to spend more CAPEX to deploy infrastructure to realise the digital economy than European or North American counterparts, while simultaneously collecting smaller tariffs off customers, it cannot afford to lose the added value created in other areas of the ecosystem.

This is a change in the industry’s landscape which has been coming for years, but the telcos seem to be struggling to capitalise on. The rules are shifting with the cloud and OTT players securing the lion’s share of newly created revenues without assuming the risk and vast expenditure of network deployment. Not only will the telcos have to transform culture and operations to reverse this trend, but also create new relationships with competitors.

Elbashir pointed to joint investments in infrastructure to reduce financial exposure and allow telcos to spread CAPEX further. Multiple joint ventures would allow for quicker expansion of network infrastructure, increasing the connectivity footprint of the telcos, but also allow talent to focus on creating strategies and products to capitalise on the created value in the digital ecosystem.

Collaboration is a key word, though we all know how difficult it can be to create. However, telcos should recognise the greatest threat is not from other telcos who are fighting for subscriptions, but the OTTs and cloud players who so easily secure revenues in segments of the ecosystem the telcos are struggling to exploit. The threat from the OTTs is a simple one, but if it is not addressed, growth is going to be impossible.

This is a new market dynamic, and while the OTTs might be a threat to all telcos around the world, it seems to be more pronounced in Africa.

Xiaomi the difference: Chinese smart device maker vows to disrupt UK market

Xiaomi launched Mi 8 Pro, the first time it has unveiled new products outside of Greater China, a sign of its ambition to expand in more mature markets.

At a Hollywoodian event (as almost all smartphone launches are nowadays) in Barbican Centre on Thursday, Xiaomi became the latest Chinese smartphone maker to introduce their latest products in London, following recent launches by Huawei and OnePlus. The company unveiled Mi 8 Pro, an upgrade version of its Mi 8 model launched earlier in China.

After registering impressive growth in India and other markets in Asia, as well as consolidating its position in China, Xiaomi, like some other Chinese brands, is eyeing the mature markets for new growth. Western Europe is an attractive option as the market is not flooded with hundreds of smartphone brands as in India and China, and there is a sizeable open market that is easier for new brands to set a foot in instead of having to crack the carrier market as in the US.

“Today we witness a new chapter in Xiaomi’s global expansion journey, underpinned by our global ambitions. We are thrilled to make great strides by announcing our arrival in the UK,” said Wang Xiang, Senior Vice President of Xiaomi Corporation.” By bringing a range of our amazing products at honest pricing we want to offer more choices and let everyone in the UK enjoy a connected simple life through our innovative technology.”

The newly launched Mi 8Pro and its predecessor share exactly the same hardware and software, powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 CPU, 6.21” AMOLED display (yes, need to go to the second decimal digit), 8GB RAM and 128GB onboard memory,12MP+12MP AI dual camera on the back, and 20MP selfie camera, Dual 4G SIM, Dual frequency GPS (to minimise coverage dead zones, like near tall buildings), infra-red facial recognition (to unlock with facial ID in the dark).

On the software side, Xiaomi overlayed a light MIUI skin on top of the latest Android release, plus a couple of its own preloaded apps (browser, messaging, etc.). Presumably the main point is not how many people will use its apps but rather to gather usage data. The Xiaomi executives did stress the number of active MIUI users in the world and in Europe (its products are already being sold in Spain, Italy, and France). It has also preloaded a MS Office suite, one of the first offers Microsoft made to the Android ecosystem back in 2016.

Under the spotlight was its photography technologies including the so-called “4-in-1” super-pixel, that is combining 4 pixels into 1 to take in more light, therefore to capture more details even in low light environment. Also being boasted is the speed the phone focuses (using the so-called Double Pixel Auto Focus, DPAF, technology, demonstrated in a video as faster than both the iPhone XS and the Samsung S9+). Nowadays, no presentation of smartphone cameras is complete without talking AI, and Xiaomi is no exception. The main talking point here was on the analytics capability to separate foreground from background, making post-shot processing easier.

The only genuine upgrade the Mi 8 Pro offers over the Mi 8 looks to be the fingerprint reader. It is at the back of the phone on the Mi 8, but is upgraded to on-screen reader on the Mi 8 Pro.

All the bells and whistles aside, what Xiaomi most wanted is to stand out in two areas: design and price. It is clearly successful in one, maybe less so in the other. Xiaomi claimed to go down the minimalist route for its design, claiming that it was inspired by the exhibits at the Helsinki Design Museum. It even got the director of the museum to go on video to endorse an earlier product. But what it got to show its innovative design on the new product is a transparent back-cover where the upper part of the inside of the phone is visible. But to those of us old enough to remember the 1990s, this is more a retro than inno. Swatch’s Skeleton series, anyone?

Xiaomi Mi 8 Pro_Front resized Xiaomi Mi 8 Pro_back resized

But when it comes to pricing the strategy is much bolder and more likely to succeed. Xiaomi broke through in the device market in China in 2011 by offering smartphones with decent specs at a very affordable price. This strategy has carried them through ups and downs all the way to London. The Mi 8 Pro will be retailed at £499.99. This is vastly lower than other smartphones with comparable hardware specs. Xiaomi is clearly targeted at the so-called “affordable premium” segment.

On the distribution side, Xiaomi started in China exclusively using online distribution channels. There have been followers with mixed success, but at the same Xiaomi is also diversifying to brick-and-mortar retail outlets in markets like India, Malaysia. Xiaomi also aims at a mixed channel strategy in the UK, it opens its own online shopping channel, getting online and offline channel partners (Amazon, Currys, Carphone Warehouse, Argo, John Lewis, etc.) on board, as well as opening its own authorised retailer in southwest London on 18 November. It also tied a partnership with 3UK, though Xiaomi executives would not tell more details of the terms or the packages 3 plans to offer.

Also introduced to the UK market at the event are a smart wristband (Mi Band 3, main feature being its display larger than previous generations) and an electric scooter, to deliver the “ecosystem” story—the executive stressed Xiaomi is more than a smartphone company. On display in the experience area were also smart speakers, set-top boxes, smart kettle, and smart scale.

Our overall feeling is that, the Mi 8 Pro smartphone is decent but not fantastic. However the price point Xiaomi sets it on is disruptive. This strategy has worked for the company in China and other Asian and European market, taking them to commendable market positions and financial success. It may stand a chance.

Xiaomi event pic2

Chip division continues to carry Samsung

Samsung has released its quarterly numbers, and while it is an improvement on the last quarter, the business is seemingly being propped up by a surging semiconductor unit.

Total revenues for the three months stood at roughly $57 billion, a 5.5% increase from the same period in 2017, while operating profit came in at roughly 15.5 billion, a year-on-year increase of 20.9%. The earnings were largely in line with the expectations the management team floated a few weeks back.

“In the third quarter, operating profit reached a new quarterly high for the company driven mainly by the continued strength of the Memory Business,” the team said in a statement. “Total revenue increased YoY and QoQ on the back of strong sales of memory products and OLED panels.

“The Korean won remained weak against the US dollar, resulting in a positive QoQ effect of approximately KRW 800 billion, experienced mainly in the components businesses. However the Korean won rose against major emerging currencies, which weighed slightly on the set businesses.”

Looking at the individual business units, the chip team rose to the top of the rankings once again. Revenues came in at roughly $22 billion for the quarter, with profit standing at $12 billion. Although demand is set to be weaker for the next quarter, the team anticipate slight increases over the next twelve months as demand for public cloud market, and mobile storage expands.

With fingers pointing to increased competition, revenues fell in the IT & Mobile Communications with over smartphone shipments remaining flat due to a decrease in sales of mid- to low-end products. High promotional costs and fluctuating currencies have been blamed for a dip in profitability, with the division only contributing $1.9 billion, despite it claiming pretty much the same revenues as the chip boys.

Another unit worth keeping an eye on will be the Networks unit. While revenues were down year-on-year, owing to decreased investments in 4G and the 5G euphoria yet to kick in, Samsung does seem to be benefiting from the increased scrutiny placed on Huawei in recent months. With many telcos snubbing Huawei, or at least decreasing dependence on the vendor, Samsung could certainly take advantage.

With Huawei and Xiaomi offering a more sustained threat in markets where Samsung traditionally dominates, this might not be the end of the woes for the start-studded division of Samsung.

Q3 validates O2 indifference towards convergence

Telefonica’s UK business O2 has continued a strong 2018 performance with a 7.9% increase in revenues in the third quarter, while it greedily captured an additional 120,000 subscribers.

The results perhaps justify the businesses decision not to enter into the convergence fight. Back in July, CEO Mark Evans confirmed the business would continue to focus on its mobile-only proposition, and wasn’t convinced entirely by the idea of bundled services. This statement is certainly contradictory to many telcos across the world, including its own cousin, Telefonica Germany, which plugged 5G FWA at Broadband World Forum. That said, the numbers speak for themselves.

Over the last three months, total revenues stood at £1.5 billion, up 7.9% year-on-year, while mobile service revenues grew by 3.4%, thanks to customers choosing larger bundles and MVNO growth. The O2 network now has 32.3 million customers, including MVNOs such as Lycamobile, making it the busiest network in the UK. Churn was also down to 1%, which O2 claims is the best in the UK.

“We continue to put the customer at the heart of our business, delivering leading propositions and unique customer experiences, as demonstrated by the launch of our revolutionary O2 Custom Plans, exclusively available in our direct channels,” said Evans. “O2 Custom Plan offers customers real choice, by giving them control, flexibility and transparency, and has once again driven the O2 point of difference in the market.

“Our on-going commitment to invest in our network includes enhancing 4G connectivity and preparing the ground for 5G. As champions of mobile we continue to build for the future, where mobile is one of the most powerful opportunities to strengthen the UK economy and enrich our society.”

This laser like focus on mobile is probably best for everyone involved. Despite O2 leading in the market share race, it has consistently been condemned for having the worst network in the UK. This has been confirmed quarter after quarter, by a variety of different sources. Some might come to the conclusion the consistency of poor performance simply suggests the management team does not care that much. However, efforts are being made to improve this record.

In the most recent spectrum auction, O2 claimed all the available 2.3 GHz spectrum to enhance its 4G offering. This spectrum has already been put to use, while most recently O2 suggested it was going to improve connectivity in 339 rural communities throughout the UK. The business is investing in its network, with the financial results indicating O2 spent £192 million on CAPEX over the quarter, which works out at roughly 12.5% of total revenues. This is not the highest around, but it is a healthy number.

O2 is the first of the UK MNOs to release its financial results for the third quarter, so there isn’t a fair comparison to make at the moment. However, 7.9% growth is going to be a very tough number to beat. Perhaps there is something in this ‘do what you know how to do’ mentality from O2.

We’ll be ready for 5G by 2020 – Reliance Jio

Reliance Jio owner Mukesh Ambani has stated India will be fully-4G by 2020, and is setting his eyes on the 5G euphoria already.

The statement of intent adds to a remarkable couple of years for Reliance Jio and the Indian digital economy on the whole. Starting from nothing in December 2015, Reliance Jio has risen to become arguably the most influential telco in India, dragging the country’s digital economy into the 21st century. A little over two years ago, India was in the digital baron lands, though now the Indian digital appetites are as insatiable as those in ‘developed’ nations.

“India has moved from 155th rank in mobile broadband penetration to being the number 1 nation in mobile data consumption in the world… in less than two years,” said Ambani at the India Mobile Congress, courtesy of Live Mint. “This is the fastest transition anywhere in the world from 2G/3G to 4G. By 2020, I believe that India will be a fully-4G country and ready for 5G ahead of others.”

Paying complements to the pro-active approach to stimulating the digital economy from the Indian government, Ambani is continuing the ambitious expansion of the Reliance Jio business. 5G is what will attract the headlines, most notably after a few telcos highlighted 5G is not a top priority for some nations at Broadband World Forum last week, but the broadband ambitions are just as important.

Tackling the 5G euphoria and increasing broadband penetration across the country perhaps work happily alongside each other when you consider the importance of a fibre network in both cases. The JioGigaFiber proposition, announced during the company’s AGM in July, promises FTTH connectivity in a market where broadband penetration is roughly 10%. ‘Fibering up’ the country is critical for 5G, and Reliance Jio has already started the mission.

“India will be among the largest digital markets in the world,” said Ambani. “Every enterprise must have an ‘India First’ vision to participate in this market. We will need to reinvent to grow and nurture this market to its full potential. This will be a win-win for the entire industry, for India and for the entire world.”

One interesting question which remains is whether the lessons taken from the Jio-effect can be implemented into other nations which are struggling in the lowly places of the digital league tables.

O2 commits to plugging 339 farmer Johns into the digital economy

O2 has announced it will start pumping enhanced 4G into some of most notorious not-spots throughout the UK, with 339 communities set to receive the connectivity boost.

While the digital divide is clearly still present across the UK, it does seem O2 is attempting to make use of 4G spectrum acquired in the last auction to counter the imbalance. The last 12 months has certainly seen O2 up its game on the connectivity front, Ofcom confirmed O2 had delivered against its commitment to provide 98% indoor 4G coverage and 90% geographical coverage across the UK earlier this year, and this appears to be a continuation of the positive work. O2 has stated in intends to improve the 4G experience for an additional 339 communities of more than 100 people across the UK by the end of the year.

“We know mobile has the power to make a real, positive difference to people’s lives and businesses in rural communities across Britain,” said O2 UK COO Derek McManus. “That’s why we’re proud to be investing in 4G connectivity for more than 330 rural areas by the end of this year. Technology never stands still, which is why we are always looking for the right partners and investing in our future network. Whether trialling 5G to support a future-proof, mobile Britain, or ensuring the remotest parts of rural Britain can connect to 4G, for O2, this is about continuing to invest in all areas – not one at the cost of the other.”

“4G coverage is improving all the time, but there’s more to do, particularly in rural areas,” said Digital Minister Margot James. “We’ve already reformed planning laws to make it easier and cheaper to install and upgrade digital infrastructure, and it’s great to see O2 and the rest of industry responding to ensure more people in rural Britain can share the brilliant benefits of 4G connectivity.”

Thanks partly to an enhanced mobile experience, O2 has pointed to a report from Development Economics which suggests tourism, transport and manufacturing segments could receive a financial boost with improved connectivity. Perhaps this is one of the most notorious statistics associated with the digital divide, but Development Economics predicts connectivity parity could add as much as £141 million a year to the 14,000 rural businesses who are missing out on the full digital experience.

Although this is a positive step forward, let’s not forget O2 has a lot of catching up to do, it certainly isn’t uncommon to see the brand slumping at the bottom of the mobile performance rankings. Opensignal’s most recent report assessing the performance of the four UK MNOs had O2 sat in last place for all categories aside from latency (3G and 4G) and availability, where it was second behind EE. Back in August, Rootmetrics also had O2 at the bottom of the pile for almost every category.

The performance of the network is certainly a dent in the O2 pride, but it has still managed to claim top-spot in the market share leagues. Although MNOs should stride towards creating the best possible experience for customers, O2’s top and bottom standings demonstrate buying decisions are more than performance orientated. The big differentiator between O2 and rest of the UK MNOs is its loyalty programme, Priority, which does appear to be paying dividends, while Giffgaff is still proving a successful venture to attract a new SIM-only audience. Such is the success of Giffgaff over the last few years, Three has creating its own version in Smartie, while Vodafone has launched Voxi.

That said, building the customer experience in rural areas of the UK will only add to the success of the telco, creating a more interesting proposition for customers which might have ignored the brand in the past. O2 has been swimming against the tide when it comes to convergence trends, choosing to focus exclusively on mobile, a decision which is increasingly looking justified.

Italian watchdog bares its gums in Apple and Samsung planned obsolescence case

Italian regulator AGCM has shown its bite is particularly toothless after fining Apple and Samsung €10 million and €5 million respectively over planned obsolescence.

Following a ten-month investigation for unfair commercial practices, the watchdog found the pair guilty, though after months of barking the bite has proven to be as gummy as a 70 year-old Welwyn Garden City pensioner. For many companies the fines would be considered monstrous, but for these two, it will barely register a blip on the financials.

The statement from the AGCM reads as follows:

“As a result of two complex investigations, the AGCM has ascertained that the companies of the Apple group and of the Samsung group have realized unfair commercial practices in violation of the articles. 20, 21, 22 and 24 of the Consumer Code in relation to the release of some firmware updates of mobile phones that have caused serious malfunctions and significantly reduced performance, thereby accelerating the process of replacing them.”

In Samsung’s case, the watchdog believes the company insisted users who had purchased a Note 4 to install the new Android firmware called Marshmallow, which was designed for the Note 7, but failed to inform of serious malfunctions due to the greater stress on the device.

Apple told the owners of various models of iPhone 6 to install the new iOS 10, which was developed for the iPhone7, without informing the greater energy demands of the new operating system and the possible inconveniences, such as sudden shutdowns. To counter these issues, a new update was released without warning that its installation could reduce the speed of response and functionality of the devices.

In a second investigation of Apple, AGCM found the iLeader did not provide consumers with adequate information about some characteristics of the batteries, such as their average life and deterioration, nor the correct procedures to maintain, verify and replace the batteries to preserve the full functionality of the devices.

Just to put the fines into some perspective, it would take Apple approximately 20 minutes to pay off the €10 million fine, while Samsung would take around 16 minutes to pay off its €5 million penalty.

The issue with these fines is the severity. Apple and Samsung have failed in their responsibilities to their customers, and should be punished. However, these are monstrous companies with unthinkably large bank accounts. Fines should be proportional to the size of the company, otherwise fear will not be instilled.

Fines are supposed to act as a deterrent for any wrong-doing in the future. Considering how minor these penalties are in comparison to the annual turnover of Apple and Samsung, what is to stop them from continuing to edge along the line of right and wrong.

Unfortunately this is the current state of play. Regulators can try to protect the consumer, but until they are given the power to effectively and proportionally punish wrong-doers, nothing will change. This is not the last time Apple and Samsung will be caught doing something wrong, and it’s because they are effectively being allowed to get away with it.

 

BBWF 2018: Consumers don’t care about tech, just connectivity – BT

Today’s consumer is demanding but disinterested. They don’t care about mobile or broadband or wifi, just top-line connectivity. To meet these demands, BT has pointed to network convergence.

Speaking at Broadband World Forum, Howard Watson, BT’s CTIO, outlined the bigger picture. It’s all about convergence where the dividing lines between wireless and fixed or hardware and software are blurred, with connectivity is viewed as a single concept, bringing together network design, technology convergence and customer insight to create a single software-orientated network for device neutral connectivity.

“For the consumer, it’s not about their wifi, or their mobile connection, or their fixed broadband, or even their landline,” said Watson. “It’s about connectivity as a whole. And I’m pleased to say we’re already making strong progress here.”

Of course, it wouldn’t be a telco conference without mentioning 5G, and this is a critical component of the BT story. Trials have already begun in East London, though over the next couple of days 10 additional nodes will be added to expand the test. Plans are already underway to launch a converged hardware portfolio, introduce IP voice for customers and create a seamless wifi experience. All of this will be built on a single core network.

But what does this mean for the consumer? Simplicity in the simplest of terms.

The overall objective is to create a seamless connectivity experience which underpins the consumer disinterest in anything but being connected. Soon enough, devices will be able to automatically detect and select the best connectivity option, whether it is wifi or cellular for example, essentially meaning consumers will not have to check anything on their devices. Gone will be the days where you have to worry about your device clinging onto weak wifi signal or being disrupted by a network reaching out to your device, according to Watson. Signing in will become a distant memory as the consumer seamlessly shift from wifi to mobile.

This is of course a grand idea, and there is still a considerable amount of work to be done. Public wifi is pretty woeful as a general rule, and mobile connectivity is patchy in some of the busiest and remotest regions in the UK, but in fairness to BT, it does look like a sensible and well thought out plan.

With telcos becoming increasingly utilitised, these organizations need to start adding value to the lives of the consumer. Connectivity is not enough anymore, as it has become a basic expectation not a luxury in today’s digitally-defined society; providing the seamless experience might just be one way BT can prove its value. Fortunately, with its broadband footprint, EE’s mobile network and 5000 public wifi spots throughout the UK, BT is in a strong position to make the converged network dream a reality.

Don’t listen to the moaners, phones are great – Three

Three has launched a new marketing campaign designed to counter all the moaning about how bad phones are for you.

In a new campaign, simply named ‘Phones are Good’, the telco imagines how historical moments would have been different if smartphones had been around. From Henry VIII on Tinder, to the Titanic with GPS, it’s a bit of fun which indirectly encourages people to use the internet more, playing directly into Three’s USP.

“At a time when we are being told to get off our phones, Three’s customers are actually using them three and a half times more than other providers,” said Shadi Halliwell, Chief Marketing Officer at Three. “That’s because, unlike others, we understand how real people use their phones.

“And although we shouldn’t be on our phones 24/7, if it weren’t for our mobiles how would you find love lounging on the sofa? Buy new shoes while sitting on the toilet? Or get a chicken cooked, seasoned, garnished and delivered to your door at the drop of a hat? As the Best Network for Data, it is our duty to challenge the cynics, and help everyone see that Phones Are Good.”

As you can see from the video below, it’s a creative way to get Three’s message across, and quite entertaining.

While Three is suggesting all these wonderful ideas on how mobile phones could have changed the course of history, there is of course the other side of the coin…

  • If the Mesopotamians had used MyBuilder.com for its reviews of local tradesmen, their grain storage units would have never leaked and beer would not be a thing
  • The Spanish Armada of 1588 could have been successful in its mission to conquer England if Sir Francis Drake was taking numerous selfies for the perfect Instagram post instead of gazing onto the horizon
  • Had a clumsy Chinese chef been following a YouTube recipe he might not have dropped a natural coagulant called nigari into a pot of soybean milk and created Tofu
  • Juliet might never have fallen for Romeo had she done a bit of Facebook stalking beforehand (admittedly this didn’t really happen)
  • If Percy Spencer had been using a calorie counting app, he would have never had that chocolate bar in his pocket and invented the microwave
  • Finally, without the power of Twitter the US might have a logical and caring human being in charge…

Of course, the revolutionary impact of mobile devices, not just the smartphone, is countered with negatives. Instead of talking to that lonely women on the bus, we stare at cats playing the piano and or toddlers biting siblings fingers. But, we more connected to family members on the other side of the planet. There’s always rough with the smooth.

Ultimately Three is attempting to push the advantages of the internet and encourage more people to consume more data. As the telco which sells itself to the more digital-enthusiastic users, using the internet more benefits it. It sells itself on data volume more than anything else.

The idea of the smartphone contradicts all the lessons of politeness and paying attention which we were taught as children. Perhaps the next thing we should be worried about is virtual reality. Parents have been telling children all around the world sitting too close to a TV screen is bad for your eyes, yet VR places a screen inches in front of your face.