T-Mobile and Sprint convince Colorado to cross the picket line

The coalition of lawyers fighting against the $26 billion T-Mobile US and Sprint merger has gotten a little bit weaker with Colorado dropping out of the resistance movement.

After the Attorney General for Mississippi secured concessions from the duo, the same has been achieved by Phil Weiser, the Colorado Attorney General. It might be the long-way around, but it does appear T-Mobile US and Sprint are turning some heads with individual, state-level deals.

“The State of Colorado joined a multistate lawsuit to block the T-Mobile-Sprint merger because of concerns about how the merger would affect Coloradans,” said Chief Deputy Attorney General Natalie Hanlon Leh.

“The agreements we are announcing today address those concerns by guaranteeing jobs in Colorado, a state-wide buildout of a fast 5G network that will especially benefit rural communities, and low-cost mobile plans.”

The guarantees are somewhat ambitious. New T-Mobile, how the merged entity is currently being referred to, has promised to deliver 5G with minimum download speeds of 100 Mbps to 68% of the state’s population within three years, and within six years, this coverage will have to increase to 92% of the population.

On the rural side, 60% of Colorado’s rural population will have to have access to 5G download speeds of 100 Mbps within three years of the completion of the transaction, increasing to 74% within six years.

New T-Mobile will also offer new tariffs at lower prices. Should the company fail to meet these commitments it will face $80 million in penalties.

In meeting these concessions, New T-Mobile might face some challenges. Colorado is the eighth largest state in the US at 269,837 km² (the UK is 242,495 km²), with some pretty mountainous landscapes. That said, the population does seem to help these coverage commitments.

Colorado has a population of roughly 5.6 million people, of which 4.89 million live in urban locations. The state has 196 towns and 73 cities, with the five biggest accounting for roughly 1.6 million people (23% of total). Should New T-Mobile cover the ten largest cities with 5G within three years, it would have achieved roughly 38% population coverage, more than half of the commitment made to the State.

With Colorado being a highly urbanised population, only 13% are described as living in rural environment according to Rural Health Info, the equation does not look quite as daunting. Another element to consider is the spectrum assets which will be owned by New T-Mobile.

Although it has been toying with the high-speed mmWave spectrum bands, New T-Mobile will have the benefits of the 600 MHz spectrum offering greater range for meeting the concessions. This will not deliver the eye watering speed which has been promised in perfect scenarios for 5G, though it will aid the demands of network densification. During a trial in January, T-Mobile US claimed a 5G call over 600 MHz could reach 1000 square miles from a single cell site.

Interestingly enough, the merger will also offer access to valuable mid-band spectrum which Sprint has been boasting about for years. Sprint is currently hording licences for the valuable 2.5 GHz band, very similar to the mid-band spectrum airwaves which are being championed in Europe because of the more palatable compromise between speed and coverage. Combining these assets with the mmWave trials puts New T-Mobile in a pretty attractive position.

Alongside the conditions placed on New T-Mobile, Dish will also face its own demands following the completion of the $5 billion acquisition of Sprint’s prepaid brand to maintain competition levels across the country. Dish will have to maintain the HQ in Colorado for at least seven years, hire an additional 2,000 people to work on the wireless business and Colorado will have to be one of the first 10 states Dish launches 5G in. Failure to meet these conditions will result in $20 million in fines.

The win in Colorado is a significant one for New T-Mobile and adds to the momentum gained in Mississippi. In this southern state, New T-Mobile will have to deploy a 5G networ with at least 62% of the population experiencing download speeds of at least 100 Mbps. These numbers increase to 88% within six years of the completion of the merger, though 88% of the rural population will also have to be upgraded to 5G by this time also.

Although this is not the end of the lawsuit led by the New York Attorney General, Letitia James to block the merger on competition grounds, it adds a dent to momentum.

The prospect of tackling James and a herd of 16 Attorney Generals might have seemed like a daunting one, but the divide and conquer strategy seems to be working well here. If the T-Mobile US and Sprint lawyers can convince a few more into ditching the lawsuit, the threat looks significantly lessened.

While there are some states where applying the same conditions as have been negotiated in Colorado and Mississippi would be incredibly difficult, the lawyers don’t have to worry about them. Chipping away at the states where 5G deployment might be a simpler task would certainly lessen the threat being posed by the coalition. There only needs to be another three or four convinced to cross the picket-line and the support for the merger starts to look much more substantial.

AT&T offloads Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands units to Liberty LATAM

Some might suggest this is a knee-jerk reaction to the intentions of an activist investor, though the vulture fund should not be able to claim credit for this one.

AT&T has announced it will sell its wireless and wireline operations in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands to Liberty LATAM for $1.95 billion. The transaction is expected to close in six to nine months, depending on approvals from the FCC and the Department of Justice.

“I’m especially proud of our network and the recent network enhancements that have helped AT&T rank as the fastest network in Puerto Rico,” said Jose J. Davila, AT&T’s GM for the region. “AT&T also has the most coverage on the island, according to Mosaik.

“Our experienced and committed team members will continue to support these operations as we join Liberty Latin America. Liberty Latin America has expressed its commitment to provide high-quality communications services to the people of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. And we’re confident that it is equally committed to supporting these communities.”

Although pressure is being applied to the AT&T management team by activist investor Elliott Management, this perhaps not a move which would have been seen as attractive. The vulture fund does often approve of asset divestment in the pursuit of increased dividends and a higher share price, but the intricacies of this deal does not add up.

In an open letter to AT&T investors, Elliott Management did call for divestment but only in pursuit of refocusing the business on core activities. In other words, Elliott Management wants AT&T to focus more acutely on connectivity products and services.

Looking at this deal with Liberty LATAM, AT&T is proposing the sale of core connectivity assets but retaining the service and responsibility of FirstNet and DirecTV assets in the region. What is being released and what is being retained does not make sense if this is the influence of Elliott Management. What is more likely is this transaction would have gone ahead irrelevant of outside influences.

“This transaction is a result of our ongoing strategic review of our balance sheet and assets to identify opportunities for monetization,” said AT&T CFO John Stevens.

“But doing so only made sense if we received a fair value from a buyer that is committed to taking this well-run business, with its skilled employees and loyal customer base, and help it thrive. Liberty Latin America has a strong reputation for quality of service, and we believe they have the experience to build on the success of these operations.”

As of June 2019, AT&T’s debt stood at $158 billion, largely thanks to expensive acquisitions in the pursuit of diversification. The team has said it plans to lower its debt by $20 billion over the course of the year. The team now claims to have completed or announced monetization efforts totalling more than $11 billion.

On the other side of the transaction, Liberty LATAM is continuing its quest to reprioritise the business. Following a number of divestments in the European region, the telco has been attempting to gather momentum in the LATAM markets. This is another deal which will improve the position of the firm.

“The combination of AT&T’s leading mobile and wired businesses with Liberty Puerto Rico’s leading high-speed broadband and TV business will create a strong and competitive integrated communications player,” said Balan Nair, CEO of Liberty Latin America.

“At Liberty Latin America, we are focused on investing in digital infrastructure, innovation and 5G networks and on delivering a friendly customer service experience. This transaction is evidence of that, and we are confident that this new combination will be good for our customers and our employees, including those joining us from AT&T.”

Looking at the Liberty LATAM business, the team is certainly not shying away from investments. Aside from this deal, the team also completed the acquisition of the remaining 12.5% of United Telecommunication Services, increasing the presence across several Caribbean islands. In August, the telco also announced aggressive expansion plans for broadband in Chile and was in discussion to acquire Millicom International earlier this year.

Verizon buys into alternative realities

Verizon has announced the acquisition of Jaunt XR, adding augmented and virtual reality smarts to its media division.

While few details about the deal have been unveiled, the deal will add an extra element to a division which has been under considerable pressure in recent months. The Verizon diversification efforts have proven to be less than fruitful to date, though this appears to be another example of throwing money at a disastrous situation.

“We are thrilled with Verizon’s acquisition of Jaunt’s technology,” said Mitzi Reaugh, CEO of Jaunt XR. “The Jaunt team has built leading-edge software and we are excited for its next chapter with Verizon.”

Jaunt XR will join the troubled media division of Verizon which has been under strain in recent months. The ambition was to create a competitor to Google and Facebook to secure a slice of the billions of dollars spent on digital advertising. On the surface it is a reasonable strategy, but like so many good ideas, the execution was somewhat wanting.

Since the acquisition of Yahoo, Verizon has had to deal with the after-effects of a monumental data breach, write off $4.6 billion of the money it spent on the transaction, spend big to secure a distribution deal with the NFL and cut 7% of its staff. The first few years of living the digital advertising dream has been nothing short of a nightmare.

Looking at the financials, during the last quarter the media division reported $1.8 billion in revenues. This was down 2.9% from the previous year and accounted for only 2% of the total revenues brought in across the group.

With Jaunt XR brought into the media family, new elements could be introduced to the portfolio. Details have not been offered just yet, though with VR, and more recently, AR expertise, there is an opportunity to create immersive, engaging content for the mobile-orientated aspects of the business.

This transaction will certainly add variety and depth to the services and products in the media portfolio, but soon enough you have to question whether Verizon is throwing good money after bad. This has not been a fruitful venture for the team thus far.

Azure is on a spending spree

Cloud has led the Microsoft recovery in recent years, and the Azure team is doubling down on that momentum with a third acquisition in as many months.

The financial details of the deal have not been revealed, though Movere will join the Microsoft Azure family, adding migration smarts to an already comprehensive armoury.

“As cloud growth continues to unlock opportunities for our customers, cloud migration is increasingly important for business’s digital strategy,” said Jeremy Winter Partner Director for Microsoft Azure. “Today, I am pleased to announce that Microsoft has acquired Movere, an innovative technology provider in the cloud migration space.”

Founded in 2008 as Unified Logic, the focus of the business was altered in 2014 after the management team experienced difficulties in migrating their business onto the Azure platform. The start-up has been a partner of Microsoft for more than a decade, though in the last five years, it has been more acutely focusing on migration challenges for customers.

For Microsoft, this is just another tool it can talk to potential customers about, adding to two acquisitions over the last couple of weeks.

In July, the Azure team announced the acquisition of BlueTalon, a firm which aims to simplify data privacy and governance across modern data estates. Just after in August, jClarity was added to the mix. jClarity, a leading contributor to the AdoptOpenJDK project, will help teams at Microsoft to leverage advancements in the Java platform.

Alongside Amazon AWS, Microsoft Azure is leading the pack in the cloud world and it does not want to give any opportunity for the ‘also rans’ to close the gap. These acquisitions are simply increasing the breadth, depth and variety of the Azure proposition.

And the importance of the cloud to Microsoft should never be under-estimated.

After joining the Microsoft in 2014, CEO Satya Nadella shifted the focus of the business towards the cloud. Azure was the new poster boy of the firm, which was looking like a shadow of the dominant player which dominated the 90s and 00s.

Since that point, total revenues have grown to $110.36 billion in 2018, from $86.833 billion in 2014. Operating income increased to $35.058 billion in 2018, up from $27.759 billion in 2018. And looking at market capitalisation, Microsoft is now valued at $1.05 trillion, the largest in the technology world.

The cloud is driving Microsoft forward, and it is not afraid to spend some cash to capitalise on the momentum.

Orange hints it might be ready to take Romanian fixed assets off DT

Last week, reports emerged Deutsche Telekom had been given the green-light to sell its fixed network stake to Orange in Romania, and the French telco isn’t quashing the rumour.

With a 54% stake in Telekom Romania Communications, DT has a healthy position in the market, though it appears the country is no-longer part of the grand plan. Orange is reportedly in-line to purchase the fixed network stake, the remaining 46% is owned by the Romanian Government, and as you can see from the statement below, it is not denying the rumours.

“The Orange Group’s strategic ambition is to be a leading convergent fixed and mobile operator in Europe, and we are exploring all potential opportunities in Romania to further implement this strategy,” the company stated.

“Our analysis is still at a preliminary stage and no decision has been taken by Orange. In any case, such a decision would be subject to mandatory regulatory approvals.”

The reports in local press claim DT has received approval from the Romanian Government to sell its stake in one of the country’s biggest telcos. For Orange, this does look like it is a sensible move. It is the leading mobile provider in the country, though adding the fixed assets through such an acquisition would certainly make a more complete offering.

The convergence business model is one which is being firmly grasped across the Orange group. There are of course regional twists in terms of execution, though the over-arching strategy is fully-embracing convergence.

What is worth bearing mind is that there is enough nuanced language to add an element of doubt, but it does appear an announcement of some kind might be on the horizon in the not too distant future.

VMWare goes on $4.8bn cloud spending spree

VMWare has doubled down on the cloud, writing two cheques totalling $4.8 billion to acquire security firm Carbon Black and software development firm Pivotal.

Founded in 2007, Carbon Black currently offers cloud security solutions to 5,600 customers and 500 partners globally. The cloud-native security platform leverages big data and behavioural analytics to provide endpoint protection against a growing variety and increasing velocity of cyber threats.

“The security industry is broken and ineffective with too many fragmented solutions and no cohesive platform architecture,” said Pat Gelsinger, CEO of VMWare. “By bringing Carbon Black into the VMware family, we are now taking a huge step forward in security and delivering an enterprise-grade platform to administer and protect workloads, applications and networks.”

“We now have the opportunity to seamlessly integrate Carbon Black’s cloud-native endpoint protection platform into all of VMware’s control points,” said Patrick Morley, CEO of Carbon Black. “This type of bold move is exactly what the IT and security industries have been looking to see for a very long time.”

With Carbon Black’s portfolio added to the fray, VMWare has said it can now create a modern security cloud platform for any application, running on any cloud, on any device. The aim is to add more intelligence to security functions, threat detection, as well as accelerating responses to limit the damage which can be inflicted.

This is the challenge which many enterprise organizations are facing around the world; the volume of threats is increasing, but the complexity is becoming an even greater headache. With security team limited, and due to a skills shortage, it looks likely to stay this way, many organizations are turning to artificial intelligence to shore up defences.

For Carbon Black, this could prove to be a very useful move. Although the footprint of the business is already impressive, leaning on the significant presence of the Dell Technologies family, the parent company of VMWare, could certainly open doors to new customers.

After years of neglect, it seems the security segments of the digital economy might finally get the attention deserved.

Heading over to the Pivotal acquisition, VMWare will have to part with $2.7 billion to bring this firm into the family.

“Kubernetes is emerging as the de facto standard for multi-cloud modern apps,” said Gelsinger. “We are excited to combine Pivotal’s development platform, tools and services with VMware’s infrastructure capabilities to deliver a comprehensive Kubernetes portfolio to build, run and manage modern applications.”

Pivotal will add to the ‘Any Cloud, Any App, Any Device’ strategy being set in place by VMWare. Following the acquisition of Heptio last year, VMWare has become one of the top three contributors to Kubernetes, the open-source container-orchestration system for automating application deployment, scaling, and management. With Pivotal in the stable, another leader in the Kubernetes ecosystem, the momentum will only head one direction.

Macquarie bags KCOM for £627 million

Macquarie Infrastructure and Real Assets (MIRA) has officially closed the acquisition of KCOM for £627 million.

While KCOM has a limited footprint in comparison to rivals, it has created a remarkable leadership position in the Hull and East Yorkshire region. KCOM has been of interest to a number of different suitors over the last few months, since a major profit warning was made last year, though MIRA wins out after an auction process.

“We are pleased to be partnering with an investor that has deep, global expertise in our industry,” said Graham Sutherland, CEO of KCOM. “We are confident that Macquarie Infrastructure and Real Assets will support our long-term growth ambitions whilst helping us maintain our strong local focus and presence.”

“We are looking forward to working closely with KCOM’s management team and workforce to increase fibre accessibility and reduce digital exclusion in the region,” said Leigh Harrison, Head of MIRA EMEA. “By investing to develop and expand KCOM’s networks, we hope to deliver the infrastructure that will underpin growth and innovation in East Yorkshire.”

Last November, KCOM not only issued a profit warning but also cut dividends and warned debts were 10% higher than during the same period of 2017. The news led to a 36% drop in share price and also peaked the interest of potential acquirers.

Virgin Media was first rumoured to be interested in the purchase, it would offer access to an entirely new market for the telco, though pension fund Universities Superannuation Scheme Ltd (USSL) was the first to table a bid. After MIRA got involved in the financial fracas, The Takeover Panel recommended an auction.

With KCOM entering the MIRA portfolio, the investment fund is bolstering its already healthy telecoms position. Aside from KCOM, MIRA is already an investor in Arqiva, and the owner of Danish telco TDC.

Mobileum grows assurance profile with WeDo acquisition

Mobileum has announced it will acquire risk and business management solutions provider WeDo Technologies, bringing together two of the bigger names in this niche segment.

Following the purchase of Evolved Intelligence in October 2018, Mobileum is seemingly on the move to dominant the market. The acquisition of WeDo adds additional weight to its analytics armoury, aiding telcos to detect and prevent fraud on their networks, as well as increasing the physical presence of the firm around the world.

“We are excited to partner with WeDo and support them in the next phase of their growth,” said Bobby Srinivasan, CEO of Mobileum. “As we continue to grow Mobileum, organically and inorganically, the addition of WeDo’s strong product engineering, customer footprint, consulting and services teams to our existing talented workforce around the world will allow us to expand the depth and breadth of our offerings.”

“The combined business offers our customers a richer and more diverse portfolio of solutions in the domains of Revenue Assurance, Fraud Management, Network Security, Roaming and Interconnect. As the mobile industry continues to evolve, this transaction will allow us to continue to invest in the future architecture, assuring the success of our customers along a journey of continuous transformation.”

The newly combined business will have 1,100 employees in 30 offices, serving 700 customers in 180 different countries. The existing WeDo platform and architecture will be maintained, though it will also be integrated with the Mobileum Active Intelligence platform.

Pinning down how big the revenue assurance and risk management software market actually is, however, is not the easiest of tasks.

The Communications Fraud Control Association suggests fraud costs the telecoms industry more than $38 billion a year, with roaming fraud accounting for $10.8 billion of that figure. Estimates from Credence Research suggests the global revenue assurance software market was worth $2.5 billion in 2017, with growth projected at 11% CAGR through to 2026. This sounds promising, however Heavy Reading Analyst James Crawshaw has some doubts.

If we are to assume WeDo is the leading player in the revenue assurance software market, it will have a notable market share. Looking at WeDo’s financials, the team increased orders to more than €60 million for 2018. The numbers aren’t quite adding up here.

Either this is an incredibly fragmented market with thousands of suppliers making up the $2.5 billion, WeDo is not a leading name in the revenue assurance software market or the market is worth considerably less than $2.5 billion.

It is not necessarily the end of the world if the addressable market is smaller than analysts are currently estimating, as long as there is growth potential. There is of course opportunity to grow, though as Crawshaw points out, WeDo’s orders have not really increased significantly over the last few years, suggesting this is somewhat of a stagnant market.

Pai gobbles up Sprint and T-Mobile US merger

After months of headaches and sleepless nights, the tides of favour seem to be turning for Sprint and T-Mobile US as the FCC chief gives his blessing for the union.

254 days into the 180 days the FCC gives itself to approve mergers, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has officially confirmed his position. It is still not quite 100% guaranteed for the two telcos, however with Pai’s recommendation, the future is looking very rosier.

“After one of the most exhaustive merger reviews in Commission history, the evidence conclusively demonstrates that this transaction will bring fast 5G wireless service to many more Americans and help close the digital divide in rural areas,” Pai said in a statement.

“Moreover, with the conditions included in this draft Order, the merger will promote robust competition in mobile broadband, put critical mid-band spectrum to use, and bring new competition to the fixed broadband market.”

Suggesting this was a protracted and painful process might be one of the biggest understatements of the year. However, it might have been necessary considering the significant impact a merger of this scale could potential have on competition, diversification and network deployment across the US.

Above all else, the US is a monstrous market with an incredibly small number of nationwide telcos. This does of course offer economy of scale to improve investment capabilities, though there is a risk of regional monopolies due to the sheer size and geographical variance across the country. Proposed mergers which would take the number of national telcos from four to three has been extinguished in the past, though this one has passed almost every test.

The greenlight from the FCC Chairman is an important step, adding momentum to positive news from the Department of Justice in the last few weeks. At the end of July, the DoJ’s antitrust division gave the thumbs up, assuming Sprint’s prepaid brand Boost is divested, and Pai has made the same demands.

This is one concession which many expected, but we have major issue with. Dish will acquire the Boost brand, allowing it to make use of its horde of valuable spectrum, satisfying the demands, though will this be enough to maintain the current levels of competition, the objective of both the FCC and DoJ? We do not believe so.

Firstly, instead of having four established telcos in the US, consumers will now have to choose from three telcos and a newbie with zero experience of effectively running a mobile business and network. Dish does not have the competence, experience, infrastructure, processes, billing systems or supply chain to run a mobile business, and it will take years to build these elements to the degree expected.

Secondly, Dish is now an MVNO. It will be able to make use of the T-Mobile network, but the FCC and DoJ has replaced a functional MNO with an MVNO and expects no-one to notice the difference. Both of these agencies expect Dish to have its own network up-and-running in a few years, but this is another ridiculous ambition.

As mentioned in the first point, this is a company which is not practiced in the dark arts of mobile. The three remaining traditional players took decades to rollout their own networks, and they are still not genuine nationwide telcos (there are still network gaps across the country). How is Dish expected to create a nationwide, 4G and 5G, network across a country of 9.8 million km2, with an incredibly variety of different urban densities, geographical landscapes and economic societies.

If anyone thinks Dish is going to be a replacement which can maintain the current status quo, they are quite frankly fooling themselves.

What is worth noting is that this is not the end of the road for Sprint and T-Mobile. It might have secured the relevant regulatory approval, but now it will have to combat the various legal challenges.

Led by New York Attorney General Letitia James, a coalition of State Attorney Generals have filed a lawsuit to block the proposed merger. The lawyers are arguing the merger would harm competition, and it should be blocked to maintain the status quo. As it stands, with four separate MNOs challenging each other, prices and mobile experience is improving for the consumer; the lawyers are arguing that the situation is not broken, it is in fact improving, so why should the FCC and DoJ try to fix an imaginary problem?

Although the approval process from the DoJ and FCC might have been considered a significant problem, the telcos will not have to face legal heavyweights from more than a dozen States. Lawyers have a way of being very difficult when they want to be, so there might well be a few more twists and turns in this saga.

FTC warns of break-up of big tech

The technology industry has often been a political punching bag over the last 18-24 months, and now the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is adding to the misery.

In an interview with Bloomberg, FTC Chairman Joe Simons has suggested his agency would be prepared to break-up big tech, undoing previous acquisitions, should it prove to be the best means to prevent anti-competitive activities. This would be a monumental task, though it seems the tides of favour have turned against Silicon Valley.

This is not the first time the internet giants have faced criticism, and it won’t be the last, but what is worth noting is the industry has not endeared itself to friendly comments from political offices around the world. Recent events and scandals, as well as the exploitation of grey areas in the law, have hindered the relationship between Silicon Valley and ambitious politicians.

In this instance, the FTC is currently undertaking an investigation to understand the impact the internet giants are having on competition and the creation of new businesses. Let’s not forget, supporting the little man and small businesses is a key component of the political armoury, and with a Presidential Election around the corner, PR plugs will be popping up all over the place.

Looking at one of those plugs, Democrat candidate-hopeful Elizabeth Warren has already made this promise. Back in March, Warren launched her own Presidential ambitions with the promise to hold the internet giants accountable to the rules. Not only does this mean adding bills to the legislative chalkboard, but potentially breaking up those companies which are deemed ‘monopolistic’.

This has of course been an issue for years in Europe. The European Commission has stopped short of pushing for a break-up, though Google constantly seems to be in the antitrust spotlight for one reason or another. Whether it is default applications through Android or preferential treatment for shopping algorithms, it is under investigation. The latest investigation has seen job recruiters moaning over anti-competitive activities for job sites.

What is also worth noting is that the US has a habit of diluting the concentration of power in certain segments throughout its history. The US Government seems to be tolerant of monopolies while the industry is being normalised and infrastructure is being deployed, before opening-up the segment.

During the early 1910s, Standard Oil was being attacked as a monopoly, though this was only after it has finished establishing the rail network to efficiently transport products throughout the US. In the 1980s, the Bell System was broken-up into the regional ‘Baby Bells’ to increase competition throughout the US telco market.

The internet could be said to have reached this point also. A concentration of power might have been accepted as a necessary evil to ensure economy of scale, to accelerate the development and normalisation of the internet economy, though it might have reached the tipping point.

That said, despite the intentions of US politicians, this might be a task which is much more difficult to complete. It has been suggested Facebook has been restructuring its business and processes to make it more difficult to break-up. It also allegedly backed out of the acquisition of video-focused social network Houseparty for fears it would raise an antitrust red-flag and prompt deeper investigations.

You have to wonder whether the other internet giants are making the same efforts. For example, IBM’s Watson, its AI flagship, has been integrated throughout its entire portfolio, DeepMind has been equally entwined throughout Google, while the Amazon video business is heavily linked to the eCommerce platform. These companies could argue the removal of certain aspect would be overly damaging to the prospects of the business and also a bureaucratic nightmare to untangle.

The more deeply embedded some of these acquisitions are throughout all elements of the business, the more difficult it becomes to separate them. It creates a position where the internet giants can fight back against any new regulation, as these politicians would not want to harm the overarching global leadership position. Evening competition is one thing but sacrificing a global leadership position in the technology industry defending the consumer would be unthinkable.

This is where you have to take these claims from the FTC and ambitious politicians with a pinch-of-salt. These might be very intelligent people, but they will have other jobs aside from breaking-up big tech. The internet giants will have incredibly intelligent people who will have the sole-task of making it impossible to achieve these aims.