Competent robots demoralise human workers – study

Artificial intelligence and automation might well be the future (and the now in some cases) but a study from Cornwell University suggests robots could negatively impact human performance.

While it might be widely accepted robotic workers would be more efficient than human counterparts, the dream which has been presented by technologists is an augmented workplace. Humans would benefit from the power of a robot, whether this be a physical or virtual one, with a symbiotic relationship producing a greater output. This is the theory, but the research disputes this concept.

“Think about a cashier working side-by-side with an automatic check-out machine, or someone operating a forklift in a warehouse which also employs delivery robots driving right next to them,” said Guy Hoffman, Assistant Professor in the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering.

“While it may be tempting to design such robots for optimal productivity, engineers and managers need to take into consideration how the robots’ performance may affect the human workers’ effort and attitudes toward the robot and even toward themselves. Our research is the first that specifically sheds light on these effects.”

The test pinned university students against a robot in a relatively simple test. Both parties were given random text, asked to count the number of ‘G’s and then deposit the text in a relevant bin, market with a number to denote the number of ‘G’s. Depending on the performance of the human compared to the robot, the participants were placed in a lottery at the end of each round with a monetary reward. The interesting part of the test was the competence of the robot, which was varied throughout the rounds.

What the research found could have quite an impact on how robotics, artificial intelligence and automation are applied in the work place. The researchers found that as the robot performed better, people rated its competence higher, its likability lower and their own competence lower.

In short, human workers were demoralised when effective and efficient automation was introduced.

While this might all seem very obvious, the long-term promise of robotics, artificial intelligence and automation could be completely undermined. Optimists in the industry have promised the application of these technologies would be the enhance human performance, not replace it, however, it this introduction has the power to degrade human performance you have to wonder what the point would actually be.

What is worth noting is that this research is not directly applicable to most of the usecases which have been discussed, but the learnings should be factored in to any initiatives. In most cases, the technology would perform a different role to the human, whereas this experiment from Cornell University pitted human versus machine. However, such is the desire for success and credibility from people in general, they will naturally compare themselves to robot performance in the first instance, even if there is no direct crossover.

In the telco world, the main applications to date have been in network automation and customer services, the latter of which is where the risk could become more apparent. There is a feeling customer service agents will eventually be entirely taken over by robotics, artificial intelligence and automation, therefore in the intervening period the risk of poor performance is relevant.

That said, irrelevant as to where robotics, artificial intelligence and automation are being applied to the business, this is certainly material worth thinking about. If the overall objective is to improve the end product and performance, the moral of human workers will almost certainly have to be taken into account. That is, of course, unless we are all doomed to be replaced by robots entirely…

KT and Nokia will join hands to launch first ‘true’ 5G this month

Korea’s mobile operator KT is going to launch nationwide 5G service this month and will collaborate with Nokia to provide services and tools for the business and the public sectors.

Hwang Chang-Gyu, KT’s Chairman and CEO, recently announced that KT’s nationwide 5G network will be switched in March to cover 24 major cities, key transport routes such as expressways, subways, high-speed railways, large universities, and neighbourhood shopping areas. This will be an upgrade from the synchronised launch of 5G services with limited scale on 1 December 2018 by all the three national mobile operators.

“In March, KT will be the first in the world to introduce ‘True’ 5G mobile services,” said Hwang. “In the 5G era, neckband cameras, AR glasses and all kinds of devices will be connected to 5G, contributing to a better life for mankind.” That this was a personal historic moment should not to be lost. Exactly four years ago at MWC 2015, Hwang predicted a commercial 5G network by 2019. “Today, I would like to announce that the promise I made four years ago has finally been fulfilled,” Hwang added in his MWC speech.

The current 5G service that KT, SKT, and LG Plus are offering is fixed-wireless access targeted at business users. During the recent MWC, KT demonstrated plenty of 5G gimmicks for the consumer market, from a 5G connected robot butler bringing a bottle of water to the doorstep to a 5G and AI powered robot barista fixing cocktails.

KT is clearly banking big hope on 5G. Its Economic and Management Research Institute predicted that the socioeconomic value created by 5G will contribute to 1.5% of the country’s GDP by 2025. To realise such potential and to achieve serious monetisation of 5G, KT is looking towards the enterprise market and the public sector. The company announced that it plans to focus on five key areas with its 5G offers: smart cities, smart factories, connected cars, 5G media, and the 5G cloud. It says it is collaborating with various businesses as well as the Korean government to develop 5G services for both Business to Business (B2B) industries and Business to Government (B2G) sectors.

This is an echo to what Marcus Weldon, Nokia’s CTO and the President of Bell Labs, called for during his own speech at MWC. Weldon suggested the telecom industry should focus more on serving other verticals instead of on consumer markets, to deliver the true value of 5G. He did concede that it would need three to five years before telcos can see meaningful revenues from enterprise 5G. But when they do, Weldon predicted the business will soon equal that being made in the consumer 5G segment.

It just happened that KT and Nokia are going to collaborate closely in 5G. During MWC the two companies signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to collaborate on various 5G technologies. “We are excited to partner with Nokia to conduct these path-breaking trials,” said Jeon Hong-Beom, KT’s CTO. “This collaboration will ensure that we are able to leverage Nokia’s proven solutions and best-in-class professional services to provide a superior and differentiated experience to our subscribers.”

“With Korea, one of the lead countries in the early deployment of 5G, we are delighted to be working with KT to help them build a future-ready network,” added Bhaskar Gorti, President of Nokia Software. “Nokia’s end-to-end portfolio will empower KT to improve its customer experience and network efficiency.”

The key areas of the collaboration will include Service Orchestration and Assurance for the 5G era, with the aim of delivering end-to-end automation and new revenue opportunities for KT’s enterprise customers. This will be supported by the enabling technologies like NFC and network slicing. The joint work will start in Seoul later this year.

Drive.ai is on the road towards acquisition

One of the more interesting autonomous vehicle start-ups has reportedly hired investment bank Jefferies to search out a potential buyer for the firm recently valued at $200 million.

According to The Information (subscription required), the Texas-based, 100-person start-up is searching for a buyer, and while it operates in a relatively niche market in the long-run, it’s image recognition software could be a cunning purchase. It does also have the accolade as being one of the only autonomous driving services which is up and running, available to the general public.

The Drive.ai team has not confirmed the search as such, though a spokesperson has highlighted the team is always on the look-out for strategic partners.

For those who are looking to enter into the autonomous vehicles space, or bolster their capabilities, this could turn out to be a very shrew purchase. With a commercially viable business model and software which could be integrated into other aspects of the business, we suspect this might be a firm which will be of interest to numerous parties, especially with a reasonable low price tag.

Last year, the firm raised $77 million in equity financing, valuing the business at $200 million, though the final number would almost certainly be higher. Other autonomous vehicle start-ups have gone for more, while Aurora Innovation is set to receive $530 million in financing from the likes of Sequoia Capital and Amazon.

However, the limitations of the business model might worry some. Drive.ai is currently trialling autonomous vans, which drive along-specific routes, and can be hailed by potential customers through an app. It is one of the few services available to the general public, though it has no-where near the same footprint or monetization potential as autonomous taxis.

That said, the limited nature of this service might prove to be an advantage. Such is the dramatic change which would be required to ensure autonomous taxis can operate in today’s environments, these services will not emerge at scale for some time. Not only do you have to advance the technology side of these machines, but also make updates to infrastructure, regulations and safety principles, as well as considering the impact to the insurance world. The red-tape surrounding autonomous vehicles in parallel segments could significantly slow down progress.

The limited nature and controlled exposure of these vehicles could be an option many governments would consider giving the greenlight to in a much shorter time window. For the right company, this acquisition could prove to be a very shrewd acquisition.

Telefonica and Seat get the MWC wheels turning

Telefonica is fuelling the hype as we motor towards MWC with connected car announcements alongside Spanish automotive giant Seat.

In an early effort to drive traffic towards its stand, Telefonica has carpooled with Seat to give the green light to three new innovations in the connected vehicles race. While there are sceptics who would want to curb autonomous vehicles enthusiasm, the duo is racing towards a happy middle-ground with three assisted driving use cases.

Firstly, the team will introduce pedestrian detection capabilities, which will allow traffic lights to sense the presence of pedestrians with thermal cameras, before relaying this information onto cars in the nearby area. Display panels will be able to inform the driver of potential risks on the road.

Secondly, connected bicycles equipped with a precise geolocation will notify vehicles in the area when the rider decides to turn right. The bikes will be detected by ultra-wideband beacons placed along the road, and should there be a risk of collision, the driver in the car will once again be notified.

While both these ideas will be powered by edge-computing, the final usecase will rely on direct communication interface. Should visibility be particularly low, stationary vehicles would detect moving vehicles, emergency lights would be turned on while the driver would, again, be notified on the display board.

These usecases might not be on the same level as the glories of autonomous vehicles, but there is a satisfactory amount of realism on display. Autonomous vehicles are not going to be on our roads for a long-time, and while that does not mean we should not continue to fine tune the technology, there has to be a focus on improving road safety today. This is exactly what is being done here.

Another similar concept is being developed in MIT. Here, an AI application analyses the way pedestrians are walking to understand whether there might be any risks. This sort of analysis is something we all do subconsciously, but a very useful and important addition to the connected car mix.

Using lidar and stereo camera systems, the AI estimates direction and pace, but also takes pose and gait into consideration. Pose and gait not only inform the pace and direction, but also give clues to future intentions. For instance, if someone is glancing over their shoulder, it could be an indication they are about to step into the road.

Looking further into the future, when autonomous taxis might be a real thing, this could also be incredibly useful. Of course, the simplest way to hail a taxi in this futuristic age will be through an app, but if the vehicle can see and understand an outstretched arm is a signal for a taxi, it would be a useful skill to incorporate into the AI.

All of these ideas are not only relevant for the long-term ambitions of the automotive industry but also very applicable today. Connectivity and AI can be incredibly beneficial for human-operated vehicles, especially with the advancements of edge-computing and leaning on the high bandwidth provided by 5G. Not everything has to be super-futuristic, and it’s nice to see a bit of realism.

The value of AI: are operators missing the big picture?

Telecoms.com periodically invites third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this piece Albrecht von der Recke, founder and COO of fonYou, takes a look at how the telecoms industry is approaching the vast potential offered by artificial intelligence.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is disrupting telecoms more than any other industry. From automating business processes to optimising performance, AI technologies have the potential to transform networks, and ultimately provide a better experience for subscribers.

The need to embrace AI is not purely for altruistic reasons. Mobile carriers operate in an intensely competitive market, which has seen new OTT players such as WhatsApp and Snapchat competing within carriers’ traditional realm of voice and messaging services. Business-as-usual is simply not an option.

Given the current market conditions, therefore, and with expensive spectrum, network upgrades, and marketing requirements to contend with, there may be a case for operators to harness the power of AI to build their businesses in addition to tweaking and optimising their networks.

Personalised and contextual

Operators are sitting on a goldmine of personal and usage data, and AI is the key to unlocking its full value.

Powered by AI and with access to this wealth of data, operator can employ sophisticated micro analytics to automatically assess the needs of subscribers, analyse their usage and purchase history, and formulate an offer that matches their specific requirements and context.

Consider a prepaid customer that has run out of credit; an event that will trigger a response on the network in which the customer’s usage and payment history is analysed in real time. Having finalised a risk profile, a ‘just-in-time’ offer could be automatically sent out to the customer, such as a financed data package or the opportunity to top up by credit card. This offer will be delivered using the channel to which the customer traditionally best responds, before the payment is processed and the selected service provisioned.

In this example, AI algorithms will have intelligently computed the right sale to push, specifically aligned to the customer’s immediate needs. Not only is it completely personalised but, by using the insight gleaned from analysing the customer’s historic data, it also completely contextual. This may not sound a particularly taxing task in and of itself, but it’s worth considering that tasks such as this will occur millions of a time a month on any given mobile network, all in real time.

It’s clear, then, that combining AI technology with the right transaction execution and the right channel engagement can provide a real boost to operators’ bottom lines – particularly at scale. Indeed, several operators around the world have already seen an increase of several percentage points on their ARPU having implemented such solutions.

At the centre of all customer interactions

Each month, hundreds of millions of events are overlooked by operators which, if properly exploited, could represent an opportunity to generate revenue. Indeed, even by monetising just 10 percent of these events, operators would enjoy significant additional revenues and increased customer satisfaction.

By way of illustration, take the example of a subscriber on the verge of running out of data from a 1GB prepaid bundle, who doesn’t have a credit card and whose bank balance is too low to allow him to purchase an additional bundle. Under the traditional prepaid model, mobile data service would typically be interrupted or downgraded once the bundle’s data allowance has been consumed. Applying advanced AI technology, however, will enable the delivery of a service much better suited to the individual characteristics of a specific customer.

This is particularly attractive in a prepaid-dominated market with low banking penetration. A smarter prepay platform might, for example, leverage historic data which indicates that this particular customer shows unwavering loyalty, and has a perfect credit record. This being the case, the platform’s micro analytics engine will push out an offer to the customer of the same 1GB bundle he normally buys, but this time in advance, and with up to five days in which to perform a top up. The decision is made, and the offer pushed out in real time and in the digital space, removing the need for the customer to visit a physical top-up point, and avoiding interruption of his mobile data service. As a result, the customer will be satisfied with the experience, and the operator will enjoy increased revenues and lower costs.

Understanding usage and context

Very often, simply recommending the right offer at the right time will result in a customer accepting a deal which they consider to be fair and that meets their immediate needs. By employing artificial intelligence to make these personalised, contextual offers, based on continuous analysis of the huge volume and variety of user data, will not only improve the customer experience, but will bring consistent new revenue to the operator over time.

Intelligent repackaging of an operator’s existing portfolio could create additional new revenue and ARPU increases, too. Bespoke offerings could be created around application-based packages including Netflix or Spotify, for example, social media bundles, or new handset deals.

Fundamentally, all of this comes down to understanding usage and context to ensure that each offer meets the specific requirements of any given user at any given time. And with AI in place and cloud tools, it’s possible to do this without requiring humans to do the heavy lifting.

AI is already transforming many key areas in telecoms, improving network efficiencies and customer service delivery and, with digital transformation projects well underway, more change is yet to come. Looking beyond this, however, and utilising AI-led offers powered by micro analytics, operators have the opportunity to direct impact sales and generate revenue, and more confidently face the challenges of today’s increasingly competitive marketplace.

 

Albrecht von der Recke_fonYouAlbrecht is one of the founders of fonYou and has over 18 years of hands-on experience with mobile carriers. He has led successful service launches with mobile network operators – One (Austria) and Orange (Switzerland) and, as an entrepreneur, in several launches of MVNOs (mobile virtual network operator). Prior to fonYou, he cofounded NextGen, a consultancy specialized in telecoms. Albrecht holds a degree in international business management from the University of Vienna.

White House congratulates itself for catching AI bug

President Trump is set to sign several bills into law, each of which aims to stimulate US ambitions in future technologies and productivity.

While the lion’s share of the attention will be directed towards artificial intelligence, there are other bills which have been slipped in including advanced manufacturing and Quantum Information Science. One of the more important groups which is emerging from this announcement, the National Council for the American Worker, is perhaps the one which will get most over-looked though.

“I am eager to work with you on legislation to deliver new and important infrastructure investment, including investments in the cutting-edge industries of the future,” Trump said in a White House statement. “This is not an option. This is a necessity.”

Focusing on the National Council for the American Worker for the moment, this is an area where the US could genuinely prove itself to be forward-looking, instead of focusing on aging buzzwords.

The top-line aim for the Council will be to craft the masses to ensure they are suitably qualified and positioned to reap the benefits of tomorrow’s society. This means investigating how curriculums can be altered to ensure the right skills are being offered to young people, but also awareness campaigns to generate an understanding of what will be required of young people in the world of tomorrow.

What is less clear is the impact on the people of today. This is not directly covered in the press jargon, though there is an objective for the Council to work with the private sector to ensure the skills chasm is reduced. The White House has not said it directly, though this is pretty much as close as any government has come to recognising technologies such as AI are not going to be beneficial to everyone in today’s society.

Government rhetoric surround AI has been pretty consistent around the world. Firstly, AI will create wonderful products and services for consumers, and secondly, it will make businesses more profitable, creating new job opportunities. This might be true, but no-one has recognised there is going to be pain.

People will be made redundant. Jobs will be lost to software, automation and consolidation. Some people will not be suitable candidates for the newly created roles. These scenarios are utterly unavoidable. Unless government recognise this pain, nothing can be done to adapt to it. If nothing is done, there will be elements of society who will be left behind, qualified for roles which no longer exist. Governments have to wake up and be mature.

Elsewhere the President has unveiled a National Strategic Plan on Advanced Manufacturing and has also signed the National Quantum Initiative Act into law. Quantum Information Science is an area which seemingly fits perfectly into the Silicon Valley mould, looping back around to the semiconductor revolution which spurring the region into action decades ago. With 5G on the horizon encouraging exceptional growth in computing power, this is a segment which will almost prove critical in the future.

The framework is there for some potentially beneficial legislation, though we’ll see how this plays out. It could create a forward-looking landscape however it might just create a landscape which says its forward-looking.

Gartner claims people are warming to AI

The power of artificial intelligence is unquestionable, but what remains unknown is how long it will take for the technologies to be considered mainstream. Are people afraid of the power of AI?

With every technological breakthrough it takes a considerable amount of time for mainstream adoption. There are of course early adopters who will reap the benefits of AI, but bell curves exist for a reason; the vast majority will be slow to react, scared of the unknown, resistant to any form of change or dismissive of the benefits. Despite this pretty much being an inevitability, Gartner is confident adoption is going pretty well.

“Four years ago, AI implementation was rare, only 10% of survey respondents reported that their enterprises had deployed AI or would do so shortly,” said Chris Howard of Gartner. “For 2019, that number has leapt to 37% – a 270% increase in four years. “If you are a CIO and your organization doesn’t use AI, chances are high that your competitors do, and this should be a concern.

“We still remain far from general AI that can wholly take over complex tasks, but we have now entered the realm of AI-augmented work and decision science – what we call ‘augmented intelligence’.”

This is where some of the biggest benefits can be realised according to Gartner. With a continued shortage of IT skills (and also in some niche/highly qualified professions) throughout the world, AI can be introduced to ensure the chasm of ability does not negatively impact revenues. How this idea has been implemented across the ecosystem does seem to vary quite considerably.

The research indicates 52% of telcos have deployed chatbots to assist with customer service operations, while 38% of healthcare providers rely on computer-assisted diagnostics. Fraud detection and IT security are other areas which have seen AI implementation, while the breadth of services will only increase across 2019. With the smart home, and smart speakers in particular, becoming increasingly normalized in the eyes of the consumer, this looks like a blossoming space.

Interestingly enough, today also marks the day the UK Office of National Statistics unveiled employment numbers for the year. The number of people now employed in the UK has reached an all-time high of 32.54 million, while the number of job vacancies rose by 10,000 to a record 853,000. Although the early adopters, those with extraordinary technology ambitions, will focus on the added value benefits of AI there will of course be those who use such a breakthrough to reduce headcount.

This is the reality of AI which we will have to meet head on. Jobs will be replaced by automation and software, people’s livelihoods will be made redundant, unless retraining is offered. But, for retraining to be a realistic ambition first there has to be an acceptance of the negative consequences of AI.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution will be incredibly painful for some, but industry and politicians don’t seem to want to admit this, instead just focusing on the benefits. Every Industrial Revolution has been painful for those who have not adapted for the future, but somehow the rhetoric seems to be this one will be different. Putting PR spin on the issue will not help in the long-run, we need to be realistic.

Deloitte predicts 50k 5G smartphone in the UK by 2019-end

While the vast majority will have to wait some time before experiencing the euphoria of an extra ‘G’ Deloitte is predicting there will 50,000 early adopters in the UK.

After several years of slugging, the glorious 5G world is upon us. First in the US and South Korea, though pockets are starting to emerge everywhere else as well. San Marino is live while it won’t be long before countries like China and Japan start hitting the green button.

“The introduction of 5G handsets expected this year will look a lot like 2010, when 4G phones first entered the market,” said Dan Adams, Head of Telecommunications at Deloitte.

“There will be a lot of noise in the first year from vendors vying to be first to market, and relatively little action from consumers. We’re not talking about an overnight switch to faster connectivity with lower latency, we will see 5G used by consumers in hotspot locations in the next two to three years, with mass adoption by 2025.”

The first devices are likely to be with us in Q2, though this year’s Mobile World Congress will almost certainly be a shouting contest between the main smartphone manufacturers. It’s already rumoured Samsung will be launching a foldable-phone (albeit not 5G) prior to the event, while LG and Motorola are also in the running to produce a 5G compatible phone.

In total, Deloitte predicts roughly 20 handset brands will launch 5G-ready handsets across 2019, with shipments totalling one million. This is still a tiny fraction of the 1.5 billion smartphones which will be sold through the year, though 50,000 of them could be heading to the UK.

Looking at the networks, there might not be much to choose from across the UK. EE has confirmed it will launch 5G across 16 cities in 2019, though these will only be in the busiest locations. Vodafone will also launch this year, though it is being coy as to when. Three is telling the same story, while O2 has confirmed its customers will have to wait until 2020. One thing is clear, these will be incredibly limited deployments and it will be years until coverage reaches what the demanding user would consider adequate.

Whether this justifies the hype, or the extortionate amount handset manufacturers will inevitably charge the glory-seekers for the new devices, we’ll leave you to decide, but it will take years for the devices to be considered mainstream. Deloitte expects worldwide 5G smartphone sales to represent 1% of the total smartphone sales by the end of 2020, with 2-3 million Brits getting their hands on the devices. As Adams points out above, 2025 is when the team expect 5G devices to hit mass adoption.

Another interesting growth area the Deloitte team is keeping an eye on is the smart speakers segment.

“Smart speaker adoption has seen phenomenal growth in recent years,” said Paul Lee, Global Head of Research for TMT at Deloitte

“With improvements continuing to be made, demand for smart speakers could be in the many billions of units, possibly even higher than for smartphones. In the future, smart speakers have the potential to be installed in every room in a house, hotel, office, school and even beside every hospital bed.”

Smart speakers are the flashy product which will attract a lot of the consumer market, but the power of the virtual assistants is what could take the segment to the next level. We’ve long anticipated the breakthrough of artificial intelligence in the workplace, but perhaps the slightly sluggish resistance has been down to the delivery model of the applications.

Should smart speakers be adopted in hotel rooms, hospitals and offices in the way which Deloitte anticipates, the world is opened up for industry specific applications of virtual assistants. One area which might help this adoption is the price point.

While smart speakers were initially an expensive appliance for the home, the normalisation of the product in the eyes of the consumer has peaked the interest of traditional consumer electronics manufacturers. With more manufacturers, including those with the ability to produce goods at greater scale, entering the fray competition will increase, bringing prices down, while advertising will also grow, fuelling interest in the bellies of the consumer.

Deloitte anticipates the marker for internet-connected speakers with integrated digital assistants will be increase to £5.6 billion in 2019, selling 164 million units at an average selling price of £34. This would represent a 63% growth rate, making smart speakers the fastest-growing connected device category worldwide, leading to an installation base of more than 250 million units by the end of the year.

This is a price point which would make enterprise adoption of the devices more interesting, and as time moves on, it will get cheaper. The increased introduction of industry-specific virtual assistant and AI applications will certainly help this segment also.

After years of promises and false-dawns, 2019 might prove to be a blockbuster year after all. There’s still a lot which could go wrong, but here’s to hoping.

Telefónica pulls its SOCs up with Nokia’s help

Operator group Telefónica is changing its UK Network Operations Center into a Service Operations Center to show how customer-centric it is.

That was the distilled message from a press launch in central London this morning, co-hosted by its vendor for this project – Nokia. Building a SOC will allow O2 UK to make customer-led, as opposed to engineering-led, decisions about its network, we were told by Brandan O’Reilly, the CTO of O2 UK.

Telefónica has apparently already got started on this process in some of its other markets, including Chile and Germany, but this is a first for the UK and also the first time Nokia has been the vendor. So this seems like a big deal for them – hence the press event.

Tim Smith, VP of Nokia Software Europe, explained its SOC platform aggregates and standardises the various network data feeds in order to be able to compare and optimise them. It’s all about being proactive rather than reactive when it comes to network management and AI seems to play a big part, as you might expect.

A lot of the questions from the grizzled telecoms hacks in attendance focused on what specific benefits a SOC offers over a NOC and how they might be measured. While reduced churn is an obvious way to track ‘customer delight’, as Smith put it, Telefonica has its own metric called NCX (Network Customer Experience), which is currently at 79 and O’Reilly hopes will jump by at least a couple of points as a result of this shift. Here are the canned quotes from the press release.

“Telefónica has always aimed to offer the best possible experience to our customers which a reactive network monitoring approach to operations could never guarantee,” said Juan Manuel Caro, director of network and IT operations at Telefónica. “With SOC we have already transformed this in three of our markets reaching the next level in automated customer experience management, granting us flexibility and adaptability that serves as a key differentiator. Nokia’s solutions and services will allow us to achieve this goal in a competitive market like the UK.”

“Telefónica is pioneering the transformation toward customer-centric operations with the deployment of Nokia eSOC,” said Bhaskar Gorti, president of Nokia Software. “Nokia is proud to support Telefónica’s digital transformations and SOC deployments across the globe and with the flexibility to adapt to existing ecosystems in local markets.”

This all seems like quite a lot of effort to go to just to labour the ‘customer-centric’ concept that has become endemic to the point of cliché in the business world. But to be fair to both companies they are at least announcing concrete measures being taken in pursuit of that aim and thus holding themselves publicly accountable for delivering it.