T-Mobile US combines phones and tacos for some reason

Ever the disruptor, TMUS CEO John Legere has identified a combination so obvious that everyone else missed it: fusing mobile phones with tacos.

We’ve all been there, right? That listless, empty feeling while forlornly prodding our smartphone screen, just knowing there has to be more to it. But only now, thanks to T-Mobile US, do we realise that all we needed to do was nestle it in a warm, crispy taco shell and then slop spicy beef, salsa and guacamole all over it. Go on, give it a try, you’ll never look back.

Not really, but TMUS has genuinely teamed up with Tex Mex fast food chain Taco Bell to create some kind of hybrid store that will ‘…give the people even more of what they want: smartphones with a side of tacos.’ This is a bricks-and-mortar extension of come kind of promotional partnership the two organisations had previously.

“When we launched free tacos every week on T-Mobile Tuesdays, TacoBell.com had its highest online order day ever and T-Mobile Tuesdays was number one in the App Store,” said Legere. “Since then, Un-carrier customers have snagged more than 14 million free tacos from the app. People love tacos. And they love their phones. T-MoBell is the ultimate fusion of those two loves, and we can’t wait to show everyone what we’ve cooked up.”

They chose not to give whoever runs Taco Bell a canned quote in the press release, but it would presumably have followed similar lines. We would imagine Sprint is being lined up to run the delivery service while other rivals, having been caught flat footed by this bold move, must be scrambling to catch up. Expect to see Verizon 5G Guys and AT&FC before long.

 

Ericsson looks to Metallica for customer experience tips

US metal band Metallica has been revealed as the surprise inspiration for Ericsson when it’s mulling over how to keep its customers happy.

Well, for VP of Business Operations Dan Kerber at least, for it is he who chose to blog on the matter recently. Kerber’s central point is that Metallica consists of a bunch of middle-aged men who performed their first track (Seek and Destroy, see below) 37 years ago, that remain one of the most successful bands in the world because they do a great job of catering to their audience.

Of course the main reason is that they continue to produce great music, but Kerber maintains that there must be more to having such a large fanbase, encompassing all ages and demographics. He cites a broad range of price tiers and associated ‘experiences’ as one example of the kind of flexibility and attention to detail required to please all the people all of the time, as well as a constantly evolving set list.

This all leads to Ericsson’s own customer experience strategy, which is currently being referred to as ‘The quest for easy’. As you can see from the video below, this seems to be more of a 5G/IoT utopia or dystopia depending on how you look at it. “We all can’t be Metallica, but we can learn from their example,” concluded Kerber.

To be honest the whole blog felt a bit like a thinly-veiled excuse to bang on about Kerber’s favourite band but that’s just fine because the same accusation could certainly be levelled at this story. Your selfless correspondent even trekked down to Twickenham, with son in tow (who will be doing work experience at Telecoms.com next week) for Metallica’s recent gig (see photo). It was great, but one piece of customer experience advice we would give them is to pick a venue that’s easier to get home from in the middle of the night next time. \\m//

scott jack metallica

 

Ofcom’s latest ruling underlines the need for proactive personalisation

Telecoms.com periodically invites third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this article, Martin Morgan, VP Marketing, at Openet, considers the latest move from Ofcom in forcing UK operators to tell their customers when their contracts are ending, and points out why it is a blessing in disguise.

UK telecoms regulator Ofcom recently announced that it is to introduce rules to ensure broadband, TV and phone operators tell their customers when their contracts are coming to an end. This is intended to prevent consumers rolling back into largely uncompetitive ‘standard’ tariffs without them knowing. According to Ofcom, this practice typically sees UK consumers paying 20% more for the same service received during the initial term.

The end of consumer inertia?

Consumer inertia has always existed, across all industries in all countries. The fact remains that it is always easier to do nothing at the point of renewal, rather than shop around for the best deal. Times are changing, however. Telecoms operators, much like utility companies and financial services providers are having to endure consumer facing product comparison websites, a rise in third-party digital switching companies and generally, a greater consumer awareness of new offers. The truth is, it has never been easier for UK consumers to find and take a better deal from elsewhere. With Ofcom now forcing telecoms operators to tell customers it’s time to renew their tariffs, a lack of awareness will no longer be an obstacle to ‘shopping around.’

UK telecoms operators must embrace this significant opportunity. They must use the data they have on their customers to create targeted and personalised offers to them as renewal time approaches. If Ofcom forces operators to share the best deals available to their customers at the point of renewal, then this should be treated as the final link in the chain to encourage retention. The fact remains, operators will have a long window available to them, and have an individual usage and preference perspective on each customer that the competition won’t. This creates a significant window of opportunity for an operator to convince their customers that they truly value their business.

Coming out of the shadows

Telecoms operators in general have struggled to maintain brand awareness in recent years. Much has been said about operators being forced to accept utility-like status in the minds of their customers. Content providers, social media providers and OTT messaging communities hold most of the cards when it comes to mobile consumer engagement, with operators becoming an increasingly invisible part of the service value chain. This is incredibly surprising given that operators enjoy a regular monthly billing relationship with their customers, when most others don’t.

UK telecoms operators, much like their global peers, are looking to build or strengthen a series of partnerships with well known brands, to try and boost customer engagement and position themselves as the 5G operator of choice. These partnerships will include teaming up with content providers like Spotify, Netflix and Apple Music. They will include device partnerships with the likes of Apple and Samsung and, also include deals with the social media networks too. These partnerships will create differentiation but knowing where best to target this content and these services will be critical to drive the required levels of customer satisfaction and retention.

The technology exists to act

Operators have the data and the means to focus these offers to the right users at the right time. What is more, thanks to the agile and flexible nature of digital BSS technology, they can be quick to trial new offers, should some not have the desired impact at the first time of asking. Ofcom’s new rules will present UK consumers with more choice, while placing them in a buying mood – UK operators know exactly when this will take place for every one of their customers. Every customer that churns will herald a failure for operator marketing teams and underlying digital BSS technology. The solutions are available to help UK operators prevail. They must react positively to Ofcom’s rules and quickly, if they are to take full advantage of the enormous opportunity facing them.

 

openet-martin-morgan-BWMartin Morgan is the VP Marketing at Openet. With 30 years’ experience in mobile communications software, Martin has worked in mobile since the early days of the industry. He’s ran the marketing teams for several BSS companies and served on trade association and company boards. In that time, he’s spoken at over 50 telecoms conferences worldwide and had a similar number of articles published in the telecoms trade press and served on trade association and company boards. At Openet Martin is responsible for marketing thought leadership and market interaction.

Loyalty penalties for broadband, mobile and TV finally tackled

Ofcom has introduced rules which will aim to tackle ‘penalties’ imposed on renewing customers by broadband, mobile and content providers.

As part of the new rules, providers will have to inform customers 10 to 40 days prior to the end of the customers contract, the period where financial penalties would be applied for changing providers. In the notification, customers will be told the end date of the contract, differences in contract pricing moving forward, termination conditions and availability of cheaper deals.

Although customers will still have to be proactive in contacting rival competitors for better deals on the market, the hope is a more transparent approach with spur consumers into finding the best possible option. Telcos will have a year to ensure the right business processes and technologies are in place to action the rules.

“We’re making sure customers are treated fairly, by making companies give them the information they need, when they need it,” said Lindsey Fussell, Ofcom’s Consumer Group Director.

“This will put power in the hands of millions of people who’re paying more than necessary when they’re no longer tied to a contract.”

The initial idea was put forward back in December, with the belief as many as 20 million UK consumers have passed their initial contract period and could be paying more than necessary. The Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport escalated the issue in February with a public consultation aimed at moving the industry towards a position where loyalty was rewarded, ending aggressive cultures towards customer acquisition.

In September last year, the UK Citizens Advice Bureau (CAB) launched a super-complaint with the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) suggesting service providers over-charging renewing customers to bring in an extra £4.1 billion a year. Research commissioned by Broadband Genie has found many over 55s could be paying too much for their broadband service but lack the knowledge or confidence to choose a new package.

“Pre-emptive alerts and information about broadband and TV contract periods are good news for consumers since many have in effect been paying a premium for their loyalty once out of contract,” said Adrian Baschnonga, EY’s Telecoms Lead Analyst. “Today’s rules pave the way for a more proactive dialogue between service providers and their customers, which can unlock higher levels of satisfaction in the long term.”

While it will certainly take some work to bed in, such rules have the potential to move attitudes in the industry to prioritise customer retention over acquisition to meet profitability objectives. Much research points to this being a more rewarding approach to business, though few in the telco space practice this theory.

“uSwitch’s research found that the aggregate cost of out-of-contract charges to telecoms consumers is £41 a second,” said Richard Neudegg, Head of Regulation at uSwitch.com. “This is why time is of the essence – everyday spent waiting for these notifications to be rolled out, another £3.5 million is overspent on these services – meaning that more than £350 million has already been wasted since the consultation closed in February.

“While it has been a long time coming, this is an important step by the regulator to address what has long been a clearly unacceptable gap in the rules, penalising consumers to the tune of millions.”

This is a step in the right direction, but it will take more to ensure telcos shift their culture. The idea of customer acquisition over retention is deeply engrained in every aspect of the business and will define how the business operates. That said, progress is progress.

UK MNOs suck compared to MVNOs – Which

Consumer publication Which asked its members to rate UK mobile operators and found the small ones tend to do better across the board.

Vodafone sucked the most, according to Which, managing only a one-star rating for each of customer service, value for money and technical support. 19% of Vodafone customers surveyed said it was poor value for money, while 18% said its customer service was poor and 13% thought the same about its technical support.

There are various other unflattering datapoints attributed to EE and O2 too, but you get the general point. It turns out that market leaders can be a bit complacent, which challenger brands try harder. Who knew? Thee UK, accordingly, scored better than the other three MNOs, but MNVOs such as Giffgaff scored more highly than the lot of them.

“The continuing reign of smaller networks over the big players goes to show exactly how important customer support and value for money are to mobile users,” said Natalie Hitchins, Head of Home Products and Services at Which. “If you think you are paying too much or are not getting the level of service you expect from your provider you should shop around for a better deal – you might find you save yourself some money and probably a lot of grief too.”

Great advice Natalie, thanks. Some other people said things that amounted to much the same. In response Vodafone sounded contrite but EE defiant. Which also had a look at average contract prices and found that the bigger operators have the nerve to charge more for their substandard service.

Telefónica pulls its SOCs up with Nokia’s help

Operator group Telefónica is changing its UK Network Operations Center into a Service Operations Center to show how customer-centric it is.

That was the distilled message from a press launch in central London this morning, co-hosted by its vendor for this project – Nokia. Building a SOC will allow O2 UK to make customer-led, as opposed to engineering-led, decisions about its network, we were told by Brandan O’Reilly, the CTO of O2 UK.

Telefónica has apparently already got started on this process in some of its other markets, including Chile and Germany, but this is a first for the UK and also the first time Nokia has been the vendor. So this seems like a big deal for them – hence the press event.

Tim Smith, VP of Nokia Software Europe, explained its SOC platform aggregates and standardises the various network data feeds in order to be able to compare and optimise them. It’s all about being proactive rather than reactive when it comes to network management and AI seems to play a big part, as you might expect.

A lot of the questions from the grizzled telecoms hacks in attendance focused on what specific benefits a SOC offers over a NOC and how they might be measured. While reduced churn is an obvious way to track ‘customer delight’, as Smith put it, Telefonica has its own metric called NCX (Network Customer Experience), which is currently at 79 and O’Reilly hopes will jump by at least a couple of points as a result of this shift. Here are the canned quotes from the press release.

“Telefónica has always aimed to offer the best possible experience to our customers which a reactive network monitoring approach to operations could never guarantee,” said Juan Manuel Caro, director of network and IT operations at Telefónica. “With SOC we have already transformed this in three of our markets reaching the next level in automated customer experience management, granting us flexibility and adaptability that serves as a key differentiator. Nokia’s solutions and services will allow us to achieve this goal in a competitive market like the UK.”

“Telefónica is pioneering the transformation toward customer-centric operations with the deployment of Nokia eSOC,” said Bhaskar Gorti, president of Nokia Software. “Nokia is proud to support Telefónica’s digital transformations and SOC deployments across the globe and with the flexibility to adapt to existing ecosystems in local markets.”

This all seems like quite a lot of effort to go to just to labour the ‘customer-centric’ concept that has become endemic to the point of cliché in the business world. But to be fair to both companies they are at least announcing concrete measures being taken in pursuit of that aim and thus holding themselves publicly accountable for delivering it.

CMA backs super complaint against loyalty penalties

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has backed a ‘super complaint’ raised by Citizens Advice which suggests UK consumers are being ripped off by loyalty penalties on services such as broadband.

The super complaint was raised by in September by Citizens Advice, asking the CMA to investigate whether customers were effectively being punished by service providers, so called stealth price rises for example. The areas being called into question were cash savings, mortgages, household insurance, mobile phone contracts and broadband.

The CMA agrees with the points raised by Citizens Advice, suggesting the segments in question gain £4 billion a year through ripping off loyal customers.

“Our work has uncovered a range of problems which leave people feeling ripped off, let down and frustrated,” said Andrea Coscelli, CEO of the CMA. “They shouldn’t have to be constantly ‘on guard’, spending hours searching for or negotiating a good deal, to avoid being trapped into bad value contracts or falling victim to stealth price rises.”

Looking specifically at the telcos, this is a frustrating point for many consumers. UK telcos show very little desire to reward customers, setting in processes and systems which make it impossible to leave. Many will give up on trying to navigate the red-tape maze as the poor experience proves to be favourable to the frustrations of trying to leave. By making this process as difficult as possible, the telcos don’t have to worry that much about retention and can instead focus on luring new customers.

The CMA has pointed this out during its own investigation, ensuring that one of the recommendations made to government and regulators will be to simplify the exiting process. This will intend to tackle the process, systems and the fees which customers face when attempting to secure a better deal.

It appears the telcos are much better at scaring customers away from exiting than enticing them to stay with positive customer service. Your correspondent can confirm this is the case after trying to end a Vodafone contract last year. It took a ridiculous amount of time, engagement with several staff who had no idea what they were doing (or was this trained in to make the process as painful as possible?) but the mission was stubbornly completed.

“We know that the better deals are often found by switching provider,” said Richard Neudegg, Head of Regulation at uSwitch.com. “But many companies make this more difficult by not being transparent enough about the options available or how to take your custom elsewhere. We are pleased to see the CMA identify this as an area for improvement, to ensure the power to get better deals is placed firmly in the hands of consumers.”

One specific complaints which has been firmly aimed at the telcos concerns subsidized handsets. The CMA highlights telcos should not be allowed to charge the same amount per month once the handset has been fully paid for. This will be a frustration from the consumer, but like the ridiculous nature of roaming fees, because the industry has stuck together little progress has been made.

Above all else, the CMA opinion adds to the already well-known position that telcos are not at all customer-centric organizations and have a lot to do if they want to be considered relevant for the digital economy.

Repair or replace the device, keep the customer

Telecoms.com periodically invites third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this piece Kevin Gillan, European Managing Director at SquareTrade argues offering device insurance is a good way of improving the customer experience and reducing churn.

We all know how important our smartphones are to us and we are only too aware of the fundamental role they play in our lives. They are the gateway to our digital existence, they hold our precious content, they keep us connected. They are also very expensive and becoming increasingly fragile. Our reluctance to be without our devices means we literally take them with us everywhere – to help us find places, find people, pay for things, entertain us or capture memories. Inevitably, accidents happen, phones get lost, broken or stolen, sending most of us into mild panic.

The battle for customer mindshare

Most mobile users would agree that they have a much greater affinity with their device than they do with their operators. Most operators are aware of the problem and are thinking of new ways to drive brand value and customer engagement. To do this, some are investing in content partnerships, in sponsorship deals, and some are even launching sub-brands to appeal to an entirely new clientele. All these approaches are valid but there are other, significantly cheaper and more immediately effective ways for operators to improve customer satisfaction and retention.

Nothing is more frustrating to operator customers than being without their smartphones for prolonged periods of time. Then you have customers that damage their devices early into their contract (cracked screen etc.) and are forced to live with it because of the cost and inconvenience of getting it repaired. There is also the lingering fear of invalidating the manufacturer’s warranty by going to an unauthorised repair shop. And who do you think customers vent their frustration at? In most cases, rightly or wrongly, it’s the operator.

If the operator lacks the flexibility to provide a repair or deliver a replacement device to a customer when they most need it, then it must suffer the consequences. What perhaps is most significant, however, is that a customer with a broken device represents the greatest churn risk to an operator.

Why is this? Well because the vast majority of us still think of our operators as invisible enablers of connectivity – the organisations that sell us our devices and then help make them work. We have become so used to buying subsidised devices from our operator and old habits die hard. If phones break, we look into getting them repaired. Repairs are expensive, finding reputable places to carry out repairs is difficult. If phones turn out to be too expensive or time consuming to repair, most look to replace them. New device, new operator.

Meeting great expectations

Operators must work harder to meet customer expectations in areas that matter most. Historically, operators have been reluctant to offer holistic device care, despite the fact they remain the most popular device sales channel in most European countries. As their margins have been squeezed by competitive market pressures, operators have argued that device care is the responsibility of the OEM that manufactured it.

Thankfully, more and more operators are viewing device care as not only a lucrative revenue stream, but also a significant opportunity to grow affinity with their customers – beyond just sending them a monthly bill for connectivity. Better still, a growing number of operators are taking it one step forward and forming partnerships with companies that can turn a major frustration (a broken device), into a significant differentiator.

Moving with the digital times

Today’s mobile user has very high expectations of their operator. Much like in other industries, operators are undertaking digital transformation strategies to better meet these expectations. In a world so focused on customer service, companies like Amazon have set the bar for others to follow. Mobile users have grown to expect same day or next day delivery of purchased items, so why wouldn’t they expect same or next day issue resolution?

Traditionally, the operator community, with or without partners, has failed to keep pace and lacked the flexibility to meet customer needs and deliver against these expectations. It also hasn’t done itself any favours by partnering with device insurance companies that build policies based on the value of the device, not on the needs of the customer. Furthermore, they have also failed to settle too many claims for reasons that are simply not good enough. Again, all customer frustration resulting from this inflexibility and inactivity is often pointed directly at the operators.

Consumers love their devices – they’re expensive, they’re slim, they’re stylish, they’re lightweight, they break. If operators took greater responsibility for preserving the relationship their customers have with their smartphones, they could be seen to instantly react to their needs at  the time when it matters the most. By taking responsibility and acting decisively, operators can remind their customers that they can continue to be trusted and maintain the positive sentiment that will fuel further purchases and renewals well into the future.

 

KevinGillanAs SquareTrade’s Managing Director for Europe, Kevin is responsible for driving the company’s growth and international expansion. Before joining SquareTrade, Kevin served as Commercial Director for Best Buy Europe, where he developed the company’s multi-channel launch strategy. Previously, he served as CEO for Geek Squad UK, where he was responsible for creating the joint venture between Best Buy and Carphone Warehouse. Additionally, he oversaw the launch of a number of mobile virtual network operators across Europe.

The pre-paid market needs to learn how to say yes

Telecoms.com periodically invites third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this piece Steve Polsky, CEO and Founder of Juvo, examines some of the things pre-paid operators can do to reduce churn.

Since the dawn of pre-paid time, churn has been problematic. Customers switch from carrier to carrier chasing the best deal, which the industry has not done the best job of slowing by using one simple word: yes, instead of no.

Trusting their customers, and in turn, establishing a relationship with them based on mutual respect. Instead it has paid, over and over again, to attract and retain the same customer offering ever increasing discounts and incentives. Talk about a race to the bottom.

Now more than ever, in every market around the world, mobile network operators are struggling to keep up with declining average revenues per user (ARPUs), increasing costs, and saturating markets.

As PwC points out, no region is immune. Customer churn is a major contributing factor. Across Asia, Africa, and Latin America, approximately two billion prepaid customers rely on cash rather than credit to make purchases. Consumers pursue this means of transacting due to lack of access to banking systems and credit, fraud and corruption. Because they don’t have access to credit, 78% of the mobile users have only one option – prepaid mobile service, purchasing SIMs and top-off minutes on an as needed basis.

Here’s the problem. When a user is out of minutes, he or she faces choices. Is there time to head out of his or her way to top-up? If they do, is there any reason to remain on the carrier they are on at the moment? Do they feel any loyalty at the very moment that that carrier has just turned off his or her phone?

The answer to all of these questions is generally a resounding no. If a carrier has just said a big fat no to a customer, the chances that the customer says yes to them is almost non-existent.

Mobile minutes, a basic service that has become wildly commoditized, have telecommunications companies fighting over subscribers in markets that are becoming more saturated. It’s not enough for companies to compete on price, PwC explains:

“This process can be tracked by looking at two key metrics: changes in the spread between the wireless operators with the largest and smallest shares of each market’s subscribers, and changes in the spread between the one with the highest average revenue per user and the one with the lowest.”

To counteract churn, telcos need to invest in new technologies and think outside of the box. Which is why Juvo has decided to build an entire economy around the concept of saying yes, and earning loyalty in a new and exciting way that goes well beyond just airtime lending.

Changing market dynamics

For decades, telco leaders have recognized the importance of the emerging markets as a viable revenue stream. Just ten years ago, phones were brand new to the developing world. Prepaid SIMs were the most economical and efficient path for user acquisition in cash-based societies. Since then, this push has resulted in high mobile adoption but low carrier retention outside of the western world.

Today, prepaid subscribers represent a lost opportunity to MNOs, with up to 60% of new users turning over within the first 30 days, every 30 days. In hyper-competitive markets, where access to mobile phones is growing, some MNOs lose up to 80% of their prepaid customers within 90 days, and telcos are paying to acquire the same customers, over and over. The economics haven’t made sense for MNOs to build loyalty programs. With churn as a given, the path to building a successful loyalty program wasn’t clear.

But what if churn wasn’t a given, and loyalty was proven to drive revenue? What’s getting in the way?

Those operators who have tried to introduce customer loyalty programs have been ineffective because market incentives have pushed operators to compete with each other. On the ground, agents selling mobile services encourage users to switch SIMs to take advantage of a better deal. These same agents may be ill-equipped to explain the benefits of one carrier over another. When a person needs to top-up his or her minutes, he or she is going to rely on an agent to them find the best deal.

What’s important to keep in mind, however, is that this market dynamic is changing because the way people engage with technology is changing. Take Ghana, where mobile money adoption is on the rise. There, mobile money transactions have doubled to $35B. Throughout the region, the number of banks has been failing, and people are relying on their mobile phones for transactions that power their everyday lives more and more.

The mobile phone is taking on a new role in developing nations beyond Ghana, where the way banking gets done, is changing, and that is making the role of how customers choose to top-up move well beyond the agent relationship. This is an opportunity to re-write the rules of the relationship of the pre-paid customer and the carrier.

Responding to this market opportunity

It’s time for telcos to start tackling the core reason for churn, which is the lack of loyalty. But customers in developing markets have new incentives to stay on with mobile carriers—to access financial services.

Customer satisfaction is an under-represented metric that telcos in developing nations need to optimize. A shift in emphasis is needed in order to eliminate prepaid churn. This focus will result in higher ARPUs and more efficient cost-models for user acquisition. Telcos should also be looking at the relationship between net promoter score (NPS) and customer lifetime value. There’s revenue in that number, and it’s a lot more efficient than spending to earn the same customer over and over. Saying yes to customers that can be trusted, based on their good behaviour, provable by data science, is a win-win for both parties. Loyalty goes up, churn goes down.

If operators want to remove the influence of the agent, they must meet their customers at their exact moment of need, before they head down to visit the agent. Operators should leverage today’s cloud technology to understand the value of every single, individual subscriber relationship and enable consumers to graduate up to higher value, more loyal post-paid like relationships.

To continue to consumer regardless of their in the moment core balance – to break down the hard line between prepaid and postpaid behaviour to enable deeper more trusting, higher value relationships. And this is usually starts as soon as, or when they are close to, reaching zero balance. Keeping subscribers connected, recognizing the value of their relationship and giving each and every subscriber the chance to graduate to higher value plans helps them remain engaged. Operators need to reach subscribers with deals and offers before they have a chance to set foot near an agent if they are to truly mitigate the risk of churn.
A framework and pathway
The way to do this is understand the subscriber’s behaviour – much like an operator would understand the behaviour of a postpaid user. MNOs operate on the assumption that prepaid users are completely anonymous to them. The truth is, MNOs do have data about their prepaid subscribers that could prevent them from churning. But, there is a lack of infrastructure in place to manipulate this data into something meaningful that can be used to drive engagement and loyalty. But data science can provide a solution.

In fact, many telecommunications companies in emerging markets including the Caribbean, Asia, and Latin America have seen notable metrics so far. In one implementation, we’ve seen new prepaid user churn drop from 62% to 11% between SIM registration and first top up and from 85% to 34% in the first 90 days.

By implementing the top-up process directly with the consumer through their mobile device, operators meet the consumer at their time of need. And the moment of truth is brought forward. Operators are able to engage with a customer early and take the power away from the agent and place it firmly back in their hands.

This type of early interaction and focus on customer engagement, rather than a preoccupation with “churn”, can assist in stopping the bucket from leaking.

The result of this framework is the ability to pre-empt churn within the first 30 days of a customer receiving a SIM card. Through an identity scoring model, it’s possible to unlock significant value in prepaid markets, through a model that emphasizes customer satisfaction while working more constructively with agents.

Rather than saying no, sorry you’re out of airtime, what if at their very moment of need, carriers had a way to say yes? What if instead of saying no and turning away a consumer, operators said yes, we value you as a customer – in fact, we value you so much that we’d like to offer you the opportunity, a pathway to gain access to higher value services? It all starts with a simple yes. Need a smart phone? Yes, we’ll finance that. Need a scooter to get to work? Yes, we can help with that. Small business loan? Here you go, you’ve proven you’re good for it.

The more we start treating people as if they deserve more yesses based on a credit profile built on their actual behaviour, the faster we get to a world of financial opportunity. Who’s going to say no to that?

 

Steve Polsky Hi ResSteve Polsky is the CEO and Founder of Juvo. Steve founded Juvo with an overarching mission: to establish financial identities for the billions of people worldwide who are creditworthy, yet financially excluded. With over 20 years’ experience, Steve’s career has centred on founding, launching and managing early stage technology ventures across the mobile and consumer internet sectors where, prior to Juvo, he was most recently President and COO at Flixster/Rotten Tomatoes.

T-Mobile US finds a new way to troll AT&T and Verizon

T-Mobile US is testing out a new way to mock AT&T and Verizon by inviting the duo to its own TEX Talks seminars and panels on how to improve customer service.

Taking place on 24-25 October at its Charleston customer experience centre, T-Mobile US will host various companies from around the US, offering advice on how to improve relationships with customers and reduce churn. Of course, never missing a chance to poke fun at AT&T and Verizon, CEO John Legere has made it clear they are invited to the event, even if they are currently ignoring his calls.

“As the Uncarrier, we’ve always been about changing this industry for good…with Team of Experts, we’ve done it again,” said Legere. “And we won’t stop with wireless. Customer service is utterly broken in this country – it’s a mechanized mess. We’ve completely changed the game for customers, and we hope every brand steps up to do the same.”

While Team of Experts might not be the most exciting of Uncarrier moves, it certainly seems to be having a notable impact on the business. T-Mobile US has stated Net Promoter Score (NPS) is up 60% since introducing the new focus on customer service, while asynchronous messaging with care is up 34% and churn of customer service staff is down 48%. It’s not the headline grabbing Uncarrier move of yesteryear, but goods things are happening.

Announced back in August, the aim of the Team of Experts Uncarrier move was to revamp customer services and improve loyalty. The industry has come to expect big things from wild-eyed Legere when launching new Uncarrier moves, though this is not exactly the blockbuster we’ve gotten used to. However, three months on, the ‘rock star treatment’ for customers does seem to be working.

It might not be the venture into the world of content many were expecting, though it is a welcome surprise. The telco industry is traditionally awful at customer services, choosing to lock in customers with long contracts and create a red-tape maze for those who want to leave. Loyalty was enforced by making churn so difficult as opposed to creating a proposition customers want to be a part of. This move seems to be challenging the status quo.

Customer services can be a differentiator moving forward as the price wars seem to have come to a conclusion. There will continue to be undercutting and promotions, though the telcos cannot go much lower on tariffs and maintain the profit margins desired by investors. T-Mobile US has done a great job of disrupting the industry and capturing subscriptions, but momentum will run low if the same message is played on repeat.

There has been signs across the world telcos are starting to care more about their customers, Vodafone is a great example in the UK with its own customer services initiatives, though these are still the exceptions not the rule. More work needs to be done to correct years of wrong-doing.

That said, Legere’s trolling is always a bit of fun.