Complacent UK telcos to be hit with compensation costs

From today, all UK broadband and landline customers will be entitled to compensation for connectivity delays and faults.

It could turn out to be quite a headache for the telcos, as while it will only cost £5 a day to compensate customers for any delays in providing services, the sum of the costs would have been £142 million for the industry across 2018. Today, April 1, is the first day of Ofcom’s new Automatic Compensation scheme.

“We think it’s unacceptable that people should be kept waiting for a new line, or a fault to be fixed,” said Ofcom CEO Sharon White.

“These new protections mean phone and broadband firms will want to avoid problems occurring in the first place. But if they fall short, customers must be treated fairly and given money back, without having to ask for it.”

For customers who have signed up to a new provider, for each day connectivity is not delivered past the agreed upon date £5 will be paid in compensation. The customer will also be given £25 as a one-off payment for the missed appointment. Those who have reported a fault, two working days will be given to the telco to perform any work, but from then on compensation will be set at £8 a day.

In comparison, Ofcom figures suggest there are 7.2 million cases each year where broadband or landline customers suffer delayed repairs, installations or missed appointments. Financial compensation, totalling around £16 million, is generally paid out in 1.1 million of these cases, with customers receiving an average of £3.69 per day for loss of service, and £2.39 per day for delayed installations.

BT, Sky, TalkTalk, Virgin Media and Zen Internet had already signed up to the scheme, which is currently voluntary, though these providers account for 95% of customer relationships across the UK today. EE has theoretically agreed to the scheme, planning to pay automatic compensation next year, as has Plusnet. The compensation outlined in this scheme will be 9X the amount which was received by customer in 2018.

“The voluntary auto compensation scheme is a great step for consumers in the UK, but hopefully, in time, it will become part of the process for all internet service providers as treating customers fairly should be at the core of any organisation,” said Richard Tang, CEO of Zen Internet.

Although this is one step on the journey to a customer service-orientated business model which should be already expected from the telcos, there is plenty of room for error. In theory, customers should not have to do anything to receive the compensation, aside from report the fault, but it is highly likely something will go wrong with the mechanisms over the next couple of weeks.

It will be interesting to see what Ofcom has to report over the short- to medium-term. Hopefully this scheme will force the telcos to perform better, reducing the number of delays, though the amount of paid compensation will also be an interesting comparison to 2018.

Ericsson facing £100 million damages bill for network outage – report

With smartphones around the world being reduced to doorstops thanks to Ericsson’s software issues, the vendor is potentially facing a damages bill in excess of £100 million.

The full extent of the impact is a bit hazy for the moment, though it is rumoured to be much more than is officially known. What we do know is the O2 network was down for almost all of Thursday, Softbank’s customers were plunged back to the paper days and there are ‘several’ other customers who were impacted by the issue.

Ericsson has confirmed there were others, though it is remaining tight-lipped on who these operators actually are. That said, as you can see from the crowdsourced data below from wireless coverage mapping company Opensignal, it would probably be a fair assumption to add Vietnam’s Mobifone to the list.

Opensignal Graph

Looking at the bill, The Telegraph has reported Ericsson will be facing a global bill of £100 million to compensate customers for the oversight. Ericsson is yet to respond to a request for comment, though having admitted being the root cause of the data dessert there will certainly be conversations concerning compensation.

IWe understand O2 CEO Mark Evans is currently in discussion with the Ericsson management team regarding the whole issue, and the topic of damages will be included on the agenda. Ericsson UK and Ireland CEO Marielle Lindgren is certainly involved in these meetings, though we have not been able to confirm whether these specific discussions have been escalated all the way up to Group CEO Börje Ekholm.

In fairness to O2, it has not palmed off responsibility completely. Last week, it confirmed it would be reimbursing customers as a result of the outage. Pay Monthly, SMB business and mobile broadband customers will be credited with two additional days of monthly airtime subscription charges by the end of January. Pay-As-You-Go customers will be given a 10% credit on a top-up in the New Year, while PAYG Go mobile broadband customers will receive a 10% discount on a Bolt On purchase.

While some might suggest O2 is not completely blameless and should have had processes and systems in place to compensate for such instances, as the root cause of the disruption does lie elsewhere it does have some bargaining power in the talks. The rumoured £100 million bill would not all be credited towards O2, though as it seemed to be impacted the worst, it may well be seeking a large cheque to compensate for lost revenues associated with reimbursing customers.

Ericsson has narrowed the root cause of the issue down to two specific software versions of the SGSN–MME (Serving GPRS Support Node – Mobility Management Entity). These nodes in the core of O2’s network caused the calamity, as the license for the software expired.

For Ericsson, there might well be no choice. Some are suggesting up to 20 operators were impacted by the expired software license and considering the importance of relationships ahead of the up-coming 5G bonanza, the vendor will need to do everything in its power to ensure favourable terms. It seems buying its way out of this mess might be the only sensible route to take.