Disney revenues surge as world waits for streaming service

Revenues at ‘The House of Mouse’ have surged more than 34% for its final quarter of 2019, collecting more than £69.5 billion for the full year.

While investors will certainly be happy with the news, perhaps the best is yet to come. Next week, Disney’s own streaming service will enter int frame for the first time, while it has also been confirmed the service will launch in the UK on March 31. With analysts expecting more than 15 million subscribers in the 12 months, 2020 could be a very profitable year.

“Our solid results in the fourth quarter reflect the ongoing strength of our brands and businesses,” said Robert Iger, CEO of The Walt Disney Company. “We’ve spent the last few years completely transforming The Walt Disney Company to focus the resources and immense creativity across the entire company on delivering an extraordinary direct-to-consumer experience, and we’re excited for the launch of Disney+ on November 12.”

Fourth Quarter Full Year
Total Revenue $19.1 billion $69.5 billion
Costs $16.8 billion $57.7 billion
Net Income $1.05 billion $11.05 billion

Despite costs climbing 49% for the three months ending September 28, share price in overnight trading climbed more than 5%. With the launch of the $7 streaming service only days away, it is clear Disney is not shy about spending some cash to compete with the likes of Netflix and Amazon Prime on a global scale.

Iger as bet big on the streaming service to lead a new wave of revenues at Disney, and for the sceptics out there, there are now several interesting partnerships to back-up an already packed content library.

On the telco side, Disney has teamed up with Verizon to offer free subscriptions to customers who have an unlimited data tariff, while iLifers will receive a free subscription for 12 months when purchasing a new Apple TV.

Although the content world is certainly looking congested already, Disney looks like a service which could challenge the leading pair. Disney has the brand awareness, content library and aggressive investment strategy to make it work, though delivering effective customer experience will be critical. November 12 will be the day customers first get the opportunity to taste Disney+, so judgement will be reserved until this point.

Verizon unveils mixed bag as media continues downward spiral

Verizon has released its third-quarter financials with the mobile business growing, broadband middling and media dropping.

Total revenues for the three-month period ending September 30 stood at $32.09 billion, a 0.9% increase year-on-year, though it has racked up $97.093 billion across 2019. As with previous quarters, there are positives to take away though the media business is still weighing heavy on the prospects of the group.

“Verizon continued its momentum in the third quarter by driving strong wireless volumes in both our Consumer and Business segments, while delivering solid financial results, highlighted by continued wireless service revenue growth, increased cash flow, and EPS growth,” said CEO Hans Vestberg.

As many would have imagined, little attention was given to the fragile media business. With each financial statement, the $5 billion bet on Yahoo’s media assets looks a little bit more like a waste of funds. Revenues in this business totalled $1.8 billion, down 2% percent year-on-year.

What was supposed to be the pursuit of alternative revenues in the ever-growing digital advertising segment is seemingly turning into nothing more than an Elephant’s Graveyard for assets in the digital economy. Aside from divesting interests in Flickr, Moviefone, MapQuest and Tumblr, Verizon is also reportedly on the search for a buyer for the Huffington Post. Perhaps executives have just had enough and are searching for a way to elegantly backtrack.

The failings of this business unit have been well-documented, so we do not want to invest too much time here, but Verizon was always going to fighting a losing battle. Winning a slice of the digital advertising profits requires out-of-the-box thinking, the ability to make money out of nothing. This is what Google, Amazon, Facebook and other innovative digital players can do.

But Verizon is not that type of business. It is a functional, engineering-focused, traditional beast. From a culture and risk-appetite perspective it was always going to struggle to compete with the lateral thinking Silicon Valley residents, and this is further evidence.

That said, when Verizon focuses on what it does best it can make money. The mobile business unit boasts of 193,000 retail postpaid net additions over the quarter and revenue growth of 2.6% year-on-year. Revenues for the broadband business are down year-on-year, but the number of Fios subscriptions are up 2.3%. It might not be as exciting to talk to investors about the world of connectivity compared to digital advertising, but it is what the company is very good at.

The team should of course attempt to secure new revenues to bolster the bottom line as the business of connectivity becomes increasingly commoditised but taking on the likes of Facebook and Google for digital advertising revenues always looked like too much of an ask.

Although this is a dampener for the Verizon business, there is more than a glimmer of hope around the corner; 5G.

There might be some questions regarding the coverage of its mmWave spectrum, but Verizon is making progress with 5G deployment. Alongside the financial results, the team also hit the go button for 5G in Dallas, Texas and Omaha, Nebraska. All of the launches are very limited from a coverage perspective, but momentum is gathering very quickly.

5G can form the catalyst for growth is the telcos force themselves through their own digital transformation. Let’s be clear, the telcos will not escape the utilitisation trends with 5G alone. The business needs to be transformed to offer new connectivity solutions to enterprise and consumer customers alike. Digital transformation is a more pressing concern for telcos than any other vertical.

But there is hope on the horizon. The lure of 5G contracts are proving to be tempting for consumers, which will help the bottom-line as data tariffs quickly surge towards unlimited as standard, and enterprise customers are enthusiastic about the connectivity euphoria. There are of course companies who want to steal the profits from the telcos, but the opportunity is still there.

Verizon banks on Disney for SVOD credibility

US operator Verizon has done a deal with Disney to offer its new Disney+ subscription video to its customers.

Rival AT&T has gone all in on video through its acquisition of Time Warner, which enables it to offer things like HBO Max to its loyal customers. Verizon has no offsetting video assets of its own and its digital content efforts in general seem to be struggling, so it’s compelled to look for partnerships if it wants to remain competitive.

So today we have the news that Verizon is the exclusive wireless carrier partner of Disney+ and will offer all 4G and 5G customers a year’s access to all those lovely cartoons and super hero movies, which includes Fios Home Internet and 5G Home Internet subscribers. Assuming Verizon customers attach some value to Disney+, this is effectively an $84 discount on their phone bill for a year.

“Giving Verizon customers an unprecedented offer and access to Disney+ on the platform of their choice is yet another example of our commitment to provide the best premium content available through key partnerships on behalf of our customers,” said Verizon Chairman and CEO Hans Vestberg. “Our work with Disney extends beyond Disney+ as we bring the power of 5G Ultra Wideband technology to the entertainment industry through exciting initiatives with Disney Innovation Studios and in the parks.”

Vestberg may have been making a nod towards a few minor 5G announcements it had drip-fed over the past few days. You can read an excellent summary of them on Light Reading here, which is testament to the conscientiousness of its writers. Verizon also seems to be focusing its efforts on densely populated environments such as sports arenas.

While it remains highly debatable that operators will ever make significant profit from content, it does at lease serve as a good sweetener to current and prospective customers. Verizon couldn’t afford to lose too much ground to AT&T in this area after its Time Warner acquisition, so partnering with Disney makes sense. But Verizon’s negotiating position will have been weak so it has probably paid a heavy price to retain SVOD credibility.

Verizon thinking of flogging Huffington Post – report

US operator group Verizon is thinking of offloading the crown jewel in its media portfolio according to a report.

The FT has got the scoop on this one, having spoken to a couple of people who think they know what they’re talking about. They say Verizon has been chatting to potential acquirers in recent weeks, but that the talks are still at an early stage and no formal sale process has been launched, hence the anonymous source channel. The FT couldn’t get a useful comment out of Verizon.

There isn’t much more to the FT leak than that, with the rest of the piece spent on wondering whether shelling out billions of dollars for a bunch of aging internet properties was such a great idea in hindsight. Verizon dropped $4.4 billion on AOL, of which HuffPo was the biggest asset, back in 2015 and then went even further back with its internet time machine to spend a similar amount on Yahoo two years later.

The apparent thinking behind blowing 9 bil on digital media seemed to hinge on doing something clever with advertising and big data. Having a broad portfolio of consumer media would make Verizon a no-brainer for digital advertisers, apparently, but by the start of this year it had significantly written down the value of its media assets and was doing some serious streamlining.

While competitor AT&T also decided to diversify into media, it did so by buying the massive video assets of Time Warner. It’s remains to be seen whether that massive gamble will pay off, but it seems safe to say that Verizon’s decision to go for cheaper digital content hasn’t. There seems to be general consensus across the operator world that diversifying into content is the way forward but there is little evidence to support this hunch.

One of the problems is that they are not media companies and seem to take the media product – audience – for granted. Audiences only stay loyal to media if it keeps giving them differentiated, valuable content, but the tendency of acquirers is to save overhead by getting rid of writers and getting the remaining ones to churn out a higher volume of cheaper content. This is often catastrophic for audience numbers and hence the underlying business model.

Verizon seems to have assumed it could absorb the HuffPo audience into its greater media machine, but its traffic seems to be in decline. Another variable is its ‘progressive’ editorial voice, which risks relying on cheap to produce outrage click-bait. This is a very volatile source of traffic, which is probably quite indifferent about the source. It seems likely that these factors will have significantly contributed to Verizon falling out of love with HuffPo and it’s likely to make a massive loss on any eventual sale.

France pushes forward with trials of much-hyped mmWave airwaves

Much has been spoken about the promise of mmWave spectrum bands, and France has announced 11 trials to separate the wheat from the chaff in 26 GHz.

Launched by Agnès Pannier-Runacher, France’s Secretary of State to the Minister for the Economy and Finance, and Sébastien Soriano, Chair of the Electronic Communications and Postal Regulatory Authority (Arcep), the trials will sweep the country, covering a handy number of different usecases, while also bringing in an attractive number of different technology companies.

It’s a comprehensive approach few other countries could match-up to. Interestingly enough, several of the projects are being led by enterprise companies, or organizations that do not specialise in telecommunications. To some, it might not sound like the most sensible approach, though it will ensure business demands are priority number one; the problem with telcos is that they specialise in telecommunications and very little else.

The first project will be led by Universcience, at the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie, and will focus on public engagement. The La Cité des sciences et de l’industrie 5G trial platform will showcase use cases to the public, through open events, as well as temporary and permanent exhibitions.

Although many in the general public would claim to have heard of 5G, few will actually understand what it is. Education programmes are critical not only to ensure the public is made aware of progress, but also to encourage the next generation into the STEM subjects. For any nation to capitalise on the opportunities presented by the 5G era, the skills gaps will have to be closed.

The second, at the Vélodrome National, will bring together Nokia, Qualcomm, Airbus and France Television to understand how 5G can aid sports media. Low latency and increased bandwidth will be key topics here, as will the integration of artificial intelligence for operational efficiency and augmented reality to improve consumer experience.

The third trial will pair Bordeaux Métropole, the local authority, with Bouygues Telecom and will aim to capitalise on public lighting networks to deploy new infrastructures.

The Port of Le Havre will lead the fourth trial alongside the Le Havre Seine Métropole urban community, Siemens, EDF and Nokia. This initiative will explore 5G applications in a port and industry-related environments, with use-cases such as operating smart grids and recharging electric vehicles.

At the Nokia Paris-Saclay campus, trials will be conducted in a real-world environment, both indoors and outdoors, thanks to Nokia 5G antennae installed at different heights on the rooftops, and in work areas. This project also includes a start-up incubator programme.

The Paris La Défense planning development agency and its partners have submitted another interesting usecase. With 5G CAPEX budget strained already, the Government department will test the feasibility and viability of owning infrastructure and selling turnkey access to operators. This might erode coverage advantages which some telcos might seek, though in assuming ownership (and the cost) of network deployment, the 5G journey might well be a bit smoother in France.

The seventh trial will pair Bouygues Telecom with France’s national rail company, SNCF, at the Lyon Part-Dieu train station. Tests will focus on consumer applications, such as VR and AR, as well as how transportation companies can make best use of data and connectivity to enhance operations. The eighth trial will also be led by Bouygues Telecom, focusing on industrial IOT in the city of Saint-Priest.

Orange will oversee two trials at part of the wider scheme, with the first taking place in Rennes railway station with SNCF and Nokia. Once again, part of this trial will focus on consumer applications, making waiting a ‘more pleasant experience’, with the rest focusing on industrial applications such as remote maintenance using augmented reality.

The second Orange trial will focus on various 5G use cases in heavily trafficked areas, such as enhanced multimedia experiences for people on the move and cloud gaming. This trial is supposed to be generic, and another opportunity for start-ups to pitch and validate their ideas in a live lab.

“The 26GHz spectrum band will allow us to explore new services based on 5G,” said Mari-Noëlle Jégo-Laveissière, Chief Technology and Innovation Officer of Orange. “We are aiming to set-up experimental platforms that will stimulate collaboration on these new use-cases across all economic sectors.”

With the spectrum licenses live from October 7, the trials are now officially up-and-running. Each of the projects must have a live network operational by January 2021 at the latest and have to make it available to third parties to perform their own 5G trials.

This is perhaps one of the most interesting schemes worldwide not only because of the breadth and depth of the usecases being discussed, but the variety of companies which are being brought into the fray. Although the telco industry does constantly discuss the broadening of the ecosystem, realistically the power resides with a small number of very influential vendors.

This is a complaint which does seem to be attracting more headlines at the moment. If you look at the Telecom Infra Project (TIP) being championed by Facebook, the aim is to commoditise the hardware components in the network, while decoupling them from software. Ultimately, the project is driving towards a more open and accessible ecosystem.

France’s initiative here could have the same impact. By designating enterprise companies and local municipalities as leaders in the projects, instead of the same old telcos and vendors, new ideas and new models have the potential to flourish. This looks like a very positive step forward for the French digital economy.

Microsoft unveils details for Project xCloud public trial

It’s been a year in the making, but Microsoft is going through the final preparations to launch its game-streaming service, Project xCloud.

The project itself will allow Xbox gamers to play their favourite games by streaming the content onto their mobile devices. Although the technology giant has had to fit out its data centres with specialist servers to run the games, the extensive geographical footprint of its data centre network could make Microsoft a force to be reckoned with in the emerging cloud gaming segment.

“Our vision for Project xCloud is to empower the gamers of the world to play the games they want, with the people they want, anywhere they want,” said Kareem Choudhry, Corporate VP for Project xCloud at Microsoft.

“We’re building this technology so gamers can decide when and how they play. Customers around the world love the immersive content from Xbox in their homes and we want to bring that experience to all of your mobile devices.”

Next month, the public trial will be launched. The US, UK and Korea have been selected as the initial testing grounds, with consumers able to sign-up here. All you’ll need is a wireless controller with Bluetooth and a stable mobile internet connection of 10 Mbps.

More to follow…

Elliott starts calling for AT&T CEOs head – report

Elliott Management, the activist investor which steamrolled into the AT&T business, has called for the replacement of CEO Randall Stephenson.

Stephenson, who has been running the telco since 2007, will hopefully have seen this move coming. The vulture fund has somewhat of an action-plan template when attempting to cause chaos, and a complete restructure of the management team is a tried and testing phase of the battleplan.

According to Fox News, Elliott Management is not only calling for the resignation of Stephenson, it is requesting it be made responsible for sourcing his replacement and demanding representatives on the Board of Directors.

After announcing it had snapped up a $3.2 billion stake in the telco, Elliott Management set to work. As with other companies the vulture fund has invested in, the objective is disruption, slimming back the focus of the business to realise value for the shareholder. This value will take the form of increased dividends and a bump in share price.

The first phase of the Elliott Management plan has already been set into play. Uncertainty has been placed in the mind of investors with the suggestion of a new strategy for AT&T. Elliott did the same at Telecom Italia when it bought its way into the debate. At AT&T, this is a divestment in the media business and a refocus on more traditional telco business activities.

The second and third phases of the disruptive battleplan are plain for everyone to see here. Elliott Management wants to appoint friendlies on the Board of Directors, and it wants to reform the executive team. Both of these phases of the plan will put the right people in the right place to act as internal champions of the Elliott Management approach to telecommunications.

The strategy being proposed is a very simple one, though it will fundamentally alter the direction of the AT&T business. Through the acquisition of both DirecTV and Time Warner, AT&T was looking like a digital services giant with connectivity at the route of the various different products. Elliott Management wants to get rid of these added value components.

Let’s not underestimate or underappreciate how much of a drastic change to the AT&T business this is.

How this saga will evolve remains to be seen. Perhaps the content businesses will be spun-off. One insider is suggesting a JV with a private equity partner and Dish. Some might assume this would be a complete divestment. Maybe a spin-off and an IPO is on the cards to recover funds and reduce AT&T debt?

There are a lot of options, but AT&T will fundamentally be a different business. It will be one which is focused on the commoditised business of connectivity. However, if Elliott Management want to succeed in their ambition, they will need some internal friendlies at the telco. For Stephenson and other executives, this might well mean a new job.

Is the consumer the broadcaster of tomorrow?

It’s an interesting thought that might force telcos to rethink how networks are built; will the increasingly influential trend of consumer created content demand greater upload speeds?

Download will of course always be more important than upload, we will always consume more content than we create, but with video messaging, social media and remote working becoming increasingly important aspects of our daily lives it is worth asking whether the upload metric, often ignored by the vast majority, will need some love in the future.

At IBC in Amsterdam this year, the opening keynote was made by YouTube. This is hardly unusual, it is one of the architects of the OTT revolution, though the focus on content creators was much more apparent than in previous years. Cécile Frot-Coutaz, the head of YouTube’s EMEA business, claimed the number of YouTube channels which generate more than $100,000 per annum has increased 30% from 2017 to 2018. The creation of content is becoming increasingly fragmented and straying outside the norms.

And this is not only visible on YouTube. Snapchat is a platform which was primarily designed to offer a platform for consumer content creation. In January, Facebook said there are now 500 million daily active users of the Stories feature on Instagram. Even the way we communicate is becoming more visual, with more consumers opting to video chat on the go.

Nexmo claims a 175% increase in regular live video usage in the last three years, with millennials leading the charge. 25% of young people use video chat on a daily basis. These trends will only increase as more banks, retail and healthcare companies offer live video services, and more of our lives revolve around the smartphone.

The video trends which we have discussed to great lengths over the last few years have primarily focused on the consumer downloading content. It is a one-way street of information, though this is not necessarily going to be the same in years to come. The big question is whether telcos are deploying networks which can compensate for the slight twist of strain. It is a nuance, but often the biggest challenges emerge from nuance.

A few weeks ago, the New England Patriots opened their Super Bowl LIII against the Pittsburgh Steelers. Over the course of this game, 11.58 TB of data traversed across the wifi network. The peak spike for the network was during the Super Bowl LIII banner reveal, with 34,982 concurrent users and 23.24 Gbps network utilisation. The breakdown of download and upload has not been revealed, though the team prepared themselves for an increase in sharing.

“The home opener for a Super Bowl champion is special,” said Fred Kirsch, VP of Content for the New England Patriots and Kraft Sports Productions.

“The team unveils its championship banner and every fan in the stadium wants to capture that moment along with all the other festivities leading up to it. We’ve been lucky enough to have done this before and saw huge spikes in social sharing during this game so our IT department, along with Extreme Networks, made sure we were prepared.

“Man, are we glad we did. At more than one terabyte, social sharing volume during the Super Bowl LIII banner unveiling at Gillette Stadium represents the highest data throughput rate of any moment during any sporting event.”

It might be a trend which irritates some technophobes and traditionalists, but social media is a genre for sharing. It started with the written word, users simply penning their thoughts, moved into sharing of existing content, and now it is increasingly becoming defined by the user creating and sharing their own content.

This creates a new dynamic and a new consideration for those who are deploying networks. Experience is often defined by download speed or latency, however there are will be an increasing number of people who will pay attention to the upload speeds moving forward.

Another interesting element for the upload speed metric will be the fast-developing gaming ecosystem. Download speeds are all well and good, but if you are playing a game which requires you to interact with other players online, uploads speeds are just as important. They do not need to be as high as download speeds, but there do need to be continued improvements to ensure connectivity meets the demands of gaming performance.

For example, Xbox currently suggests a consistent 3 Mbps download and 0.5 Mbps upload speeds for minimally acceptable performance. PS4 suggests 3 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload, as does Nintendo Switch. For PC gaming, download speeds are suggested at 3-6 Mbps, while upload speeds are 0.75–1 Mbps.

These speeds might be achievable in the home, but with the cloud gaming segment growing, these titles can be taken onto multiple screens and onto different networks. Will upload speeds offer a consistent and reliable experience on the mobile networks which are so consistently put under strain.

All of these factors don’t even take into account the increasingly complex or immersive content which will emerge over the next few years. Or the more advanced cameras which smartphone manufacturers are putting on their devices. More tech means more data which needs to be uploaded.

We are all narcissists deep down, craving for attention. Social media is allowing us to do this by sharing video content of our own experiences, and now the networks will have to deliver on the promise.

AT&T reportedly considering TV U-turn

A report is suggesting AT&T is mulling over the prospect of selling its DirecTV assets as pressure mounts on the management team.

With the Elliott Management vultures circling overhead and an investor lawsuit hitting the New York District Court, AT&T is reportedly considering its options. Wall Street Journal sources are suggesting a divestment could be on the cards, a humbling move for AT&T executives who are seeing their diversification strategy crumble before their very eyes.

Although the sale of DirecTV is still a slim possibility, some executives might believe this is the best way in which to save their jobs. To demonstrate the scale of this potential outcome, cast your mind back to May 2018, a critical point during the AT&T defence of its Time Warner acquisition.

While the Department of Justice was looking for means to block the acquisition, for a brief moment, a concession was offered to the team; divest DirecTV assets and we’ll OK the Time Warner deal. This was almost immediately shot down by CEO Randall Stephenson, the purpose of Time Warner was to bolster the DirecTV offering.

This is the conundrum which the executive team is facing. The long-term business plan is sound; a purchase of an excellent content creation business to marry the delivery platform could create a notable share of the entertainment segment. However, the short-term threats might well force the team into a re-think.

Last week, a coalition of investors filed a lawsuit, naming a series of AT&T executives as defendants, accusing the telco of misleading executives over the performance of DirecTV. As the success of the DirecTV acquisition was being used to justify the Time Warner acquisition, the investors seemingly feeling violated, believing the gains were exaggerated or at least the longevity of the gains.

Perhaps more worryingly however was the emergence of Elliott Management. This vulture fund specialises in seeking undervalued businesses and introducing radical changes to increase dividends and share price. More often that not, when Elliott Management gets its claws into a business, executives usually find themselves heading towards the exit and a major restructure of the strategy is put in place.

If the sources are to be believed, this might well be a move towards appeasing the criticism before the HR department starts drafting emails.

What is worth noting, is this might well turn into nothing. Rumours of this magnitude might well be true, but the idea of discussing a divestment and then actioning these ambitions are two very different points of consideration. One question which remains unanswered is who would buy the assets?

AT&T is not going to be selling the business for pennies on the pound, therefore the potential purchaser will have to have a considerable bank account. It is also less clear whether this is a complete divestment or just the satellite assets. If it is just the ‘traditional’ content business, with the streaming side attached, this looks much less attractive to a potential investor.

One option could be a sale to Dish, a rival satellite TV provider. A merger of the two entities has been quashed by competition authorities in the past, though as there is now much larger variety of content options for the consumer it might be a possibility. That said, considering Dish is working through the $5 billion acquisition of the Boost prepaid mobile brand, it might not have the appetite for another large transaction.

Although this is a move which many AT&T executives will struggle to stomach, perhaps survival instincts have kicked-in.

The acquisition of DirecTV and Time Warner was supposed to be a means of diversifying the business, chasing the ever-increasing dollars which are being spent on digital entertainment by consumers and digital advertising by corporates. This was supposed to be a move to future-proof the business and drive growth opportunities.

Without DirecTV, the entertainment unit looks quite hollow. The AT&T business will look much more like a traditional telco, one which is built around the decreasingly profitable and increasingly commoditised business of connectivity. Many companies are looking to leverage their relationship with customers with additional services, and for AT&T, this was supposed to be video.

What is worth noting, is the divestment looks unlikely at the moment. It might happen, but it might well be more sensible for a spin-off and partial divestment. This would recover funds, partially satisfying the vultures at Elliott Management, while also keeping some skin in the game. It would also allow for the appointment of a new management team, perhaps one which is more aligned with content as opposed to the current set-up which is primarily focused on telco.

However, the ability of Elliott Management to cause chaos in a business when it has outlined its intentions should not be underestimated. This is a firm which has a track-record in getting its own way and raising support from other investors. Above all else, the AT&T management team should be very concerned about their future at the telco.

IBC 2019: Interactive takes centre stage as VR shuffles to side lines

Every couple of years there seems to be a massive resurgence for the promise of virtual reality before it is cast to the shadows. This year, interactive content took the limelight from VR.

This is not to say VR and augmented reality wasn’t present at IBC in Amsterdam. Throughout the exhibition halls you could see plenty of headsets and software to build the immersive environment, but on the conference stage it was barely mentioned.

The main stage is the business-end of almost every conference; it a technology or company isn’t a headliner, the ‘also-ran’ category list has gotten a bit longer. This is the conundrum which VR and AR has found itself in; there are some interesting technologies and discussions going on, but the most important people are talking about something else.

AR is progressing very quickly from the pale imitation which captured the imagination through the Pokémon Go app, but the illusive business case continues to frustrate. That said, an important trend which was evident through several sessions was interactive content.

This is an area which looks genuinely exciting. Everything from ‘Bandersnatch’ on Netflix, through to personalisation of sports content (selecting a commentator or parallel content) or Celebrity Big Brother, where users can select the camera they want to view and create their own viewing experience and story to follow. This is the next stage of content, and it is immediately more realistic than some of the blue-sky thinking ideas which are scattered throughout the exhibition halls.

Of course, this should not really be that much of a surprise. The idea of interactive or supplementary content being built into platforms is just one step along from how many younger generations consume content today. It isn’t a single point of consumption, its multiple screens, complimentary experiences and a variety of simultaneous touch-points.

Research from YuMe and Nielsen suggests the trend for adults who use their smartphone or laptop while watching TV content is increasing each year. For 2018, 187.3 million US adults admitted to using multiple screens simultaneously, up 6.4% from the year before. Users want more ways to engage with content and building interactive opportunities into content platforms is certainly one way to apply this trend in the real-world.