US consumers don’t feel there are benefits to data-sharing economy

Only 7.6% of US consumers feel they get the benefits of user tracking behavioural data, as research demonstrates pessimism towards the digital economy.

The reason companies want to track existing or potential customers, while also collecting insight on these individuals, is simple; it is simpler to sell goods and services to someone you know more about. But, in order to do something for free, you have to offer a benefit. This equation does not seem to be balanced currently.

Research from AI firm Cujo suggest 64.2% of the surveyed consumers do not believe tracking is beneficial to the user, while only 28.2% said it could be. A meagre 7.6% believe they get the benefits of tracking.

If users do not see the benefits of tracking and personalisation, there will be resistance and push-back against these practices. Data and insight is being touted as a central cog of new business models, but these strategies will fail if the consumer is not brought forward on the same mission.

Sentiment is clearly moving against data collection, so much so that 61.9% of respondents to the survey would be happy to be tracked less even if personalization was affected.

The question is what service is being provided by tracking users and collecting data?

Google clearly tracks users though the benefits emerge in several different ways. For example, more accurate results are shown when using the search engine, or more favourable restaurants are show on the mapping services. This is a benefit for the user, while also making money.

Netflix is another example where the benefits are clear. The recommendation engine will help customers navigate through the extensive back catalogue, theoretically, while understanding consumer behaviour will also inform decisions on what content is created in the future.

These are logical applications of data insight, something which the user can see benefits from though they might not appreciate them. However, the larger issue is with the majority who collect data but there is no obvious reason as to why or where the benefits are.

For the most part, this might be viewed as a security risk, an unnecessary ‘transaction’ to make, and considering the security credentials of the majority, the consumer is right not to place trust in these organisations.

Keep Your Kids Safe Online with Advanced Parental Controls

The online safety of children is a growing concern for parents. They have given rise to many software solutions parents can install on their children’s devices. While these tools provide content filtering, a savvy teen can easily bypass the system with the use of proxy sites. Most parental controls solutions offer protection only at home, leaving mobile devices unprotected when out of the home. Router-based parental control solutions fall short when kids turn off WiFi. Furthermore, none of the existing solutions address parents’ top concern: cyberbullying.

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DNS Threat Intelligence vs. AI Network Security

Domain Name System (DNS) is a protocol dictating how computers exchange data on the Internet. It turns a user-friendly domain name into an IP address that computers use to identify each other. DNS protocol is unencrypted by default.

Most security vendors still heavily rely on signature-based detection, such as DNS firewalls and DNS blacklisting. It essentially performs DNS query checks of known bad domains.

In 2-3 years, all DNS traffic will be encrypted. Analyzing DNS traffic will not help to spot and stop malicious activity on the network.

It brings numerous challenges to network operators. They can solve them by implementing security measures powered by Artificial Intelligence.

This white paper discusses why DNS blacklisting is not an effective security control anymore.

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Home Network Security for Network Operators

The lack of security is a massive risk for home users, but it is also a tremendous opportunity for network operators. They are in a unique position: They already have the hardware (broadband routers) deployed across millions of homes and can provide the necessary security for home users. Network operators can deploy AI solutions to control home automation, collect valuable insights and implement new business models.

Download this FREE whitepaper to learn more.

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Device Intelligence for Network Operators

Most network operators use basic identifying methods such as listing brand name or MAC address for devices. It allows them to provide generic device identification, in the best case scenario only recognizing personal computers and smartphones. In most cases, Internet of Things (IoT) devices are left unidentified and unprotected.

Using device intelligence, network operators can offer personalized WiFi experience for their customers. This, in turn, will improve customer retention and acquisition in different areas.

So how exactly can identified devices provide a personalized experience?

CUJO Whitepaper

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