Deloitte predicts 50k 5G smartphone in the UK by 2019-end

While the vast majority will have to wait some time before experiencing the euphoria of an extra ‘G’ Deloitte is predicting there will 50,000 early adopters in the UK.

After several years of slugging, the glorious 5G world is upon us. First in the US and South Korea, though pockets are starting to emerge everywhere else as well. San Marino is live while it won’t be long before countries like China and Japan start hitting the green button.

“The introduction of 5G handsets expected this year will look a lot like 2010, when 4G phones first entered the market,” said Dan Adams, Head of Telecommunications at Deloitte.

“There will be a lot of noise in the first year from vendors vying to be first to market, and relatively little action from consumers. We’re not talking about an overnight switch to faster connectivity with lower latency, we will see 5G used by consumers in hotspot locations in the next two to three years, with mass adoption by 2025.”

The first devices are likely to be with us in Q2, though this year’s Mobile World Congress will almost certainly be a shouting contest between the main smartphone manufacturers. It’s already rumoured Samsung will be launching a foldable-phone (albeit not 5G) prior to the event, while LG and Motorola are also in the running to produce a 5G compatible phone.

In total, Deloitte predicts roughly 20 handset brands will launch 5G-ready handsets across 2019, with shipments totalling one million. This is still a tiny fraction of the 1.5 billion smartphones which will be sold through the year, though 50,000 of them could be heading to the UK.

Looking at the networks, there might not be much to choose from across the UK. EE has confirmed it will launch 5G across 16 cities in 2019, though these will only be in the busiest locations. Vodafone will also launch this year, though it is being coy as to when. Three is telling the same story, while O2 has confirmed its customers will have to wait until 2020. One thing is clear, these will be incredibly limited deployments and it will be years until coverage reaches what the demanding user would consider adequate.

Whether this justifies the hype, or the extortionate amount handset manufacturers will inevitably charge the glory-seekers for the new devices, we’ll leave you to decide, but it will take years for the devices to be considered mainstream. Deloitte expects worldwide 5G smartphone sales to represent 1% of the total smartphone sales by the end of 2020, with 2-3 million Brits getting their hands on the devices. As Adams points out above, 2025 is when the team expect 5G devices to hit mass adoption.

Another interesting growth area the Deloitte team is keeping an eye on is the smart speakers segment.

“Smart speaker adoption has seen phenomenal growth in recent years,” said Paul Lee, Global Head of Research for TMT at Deloitte

“With improvements continuing to be made, demand for smart speakers could be in the many billions of units, possibly even higher than for smartphones. In the future, smart speakers have the potential to be installed in every room in a house, hotel, office, school and even beside every hospital bed.”

Smart speakers are the flashy product which will attract a lot of the consumer market, but the power of the virtual assistants is what could take the segment to the next level. We’ve long anticipated the breakthrough of artificial intelligence in the workplace, but perhaps the slightly sluggish resistance has been down to the delivery model of the applications.

Should smart speakers be adopted in hotel rooms, hospitals and offices in the way which Deloitte anticipates, the world is opened up for industry specific applications of virtual assistants. One area which might help this adoption is the price point.

While smart speakers were initially an expensive appliance for the home, the normalisation of the product in the eyes of the consumer has peaked the interest of traditional consumer electronics manufacturers. With more manufacturers, including those with the ability to produce goods at greater scale, entering the fray competition will increase, bringing prices down, while advertising will also grow, fuelling interest in the bellies of the consumer.

Deloitte anticipates the marker for internet-connected speakers with integrated digital assistants will be increase to £5.6 billion in 2019, selling 164 million units at an average selling price of £34. This would represent a 63% growth rate, making smart speakers the fastest-growing connected device category worldwide, leading to an installation base of more than 250 million units by the end of the year.

This is a price point which would make enterprise adoption of the devices more interesting, and as time moves on, it will get cheaper. The increased introduction of industry-specific virtual assistant and AI applications will certainly help this segment also.

After years of promises and false-dawns, 2019 might prove to be a blockbuster year after all. There’s still a lot which could go wrong, but here’s to hoping.

Judge says no to police forcing phone unlocks with face

A judge in the District Court for the Northern District of California has denied the police a warrant which would force suspects to open their phones through biometric authentication.

While it might seem like somewhat of an unusual scenario, we’re sure many of you are imagining a man pinned to the ground with a phone being waved in his face, it is important to set precedent in these matters. Just as law enforcement agencies cannot be granted a warrant forcing an individual to hand over his/her password, suspects or criminals cannot be forced to open devices through the biometric sensors according to the ruling.

The case itself focuses on two individuals, who are suspected of attempting to extort money from a third person through Facebook Messenger. The pair are threatening to release an embarrassing video of the third person should the funds not be transferred.

Northern California Federal District Judge Kandis Westmore ruled the authorities did not have probable cause for the warrant, perhaps due to the reason said messages and threats could be read through the third persons account, and the request was too broad. This is another example of authorities over reaching and not being specific, leaving too much room for potential abuse.

While this case might sound odd, the world should be prepared for more such rulings in the future.

“The challenge facing the courts is that technology is far outpacing the law,” the ruling from Judge Westmore states. “In recognition of this reality, the United States Supreme Court recently instructed courts to adopt rules that ‘take account of more sophisticated systems that are already in use or in development’.

“Courts have an obligation to safeguard constitutional rights and cannot permit those rights to be diminished due to the advancement of technology.”

In short, the rules and regulations of the land are not in fitting with today’s technology and society, but this does not mean law enforcement authorities can take advantage of the grey areas. This is perhaps an obvious statement to make, but it does hammer home the need for reform to ensure rules and regulations are contextually relevant.

While progress has been slow, there have been a few breakthroughs for privacy advocates in recent months. Last June, the US Supreme Court ruled in Carpenter versus US case that the collection of mobile location data on individuals without a warrant was a violation of data privacy and the Fourth Amendment of the US constitution.

The issue which many courts are facing is precedent. Lawyers are arguing for certain cases and warrants using precedent which is from another era. Theoretically, these rules can be applied, but when you consider the drastic and fundamental changes which have occurred in the communications world, you have to wonder whether anything from previous decades is relevant anymore.

As Judge Westmore points out, technology is vastly outpacing the pace of change in public sector institutions. This presents a massive risk of abuse, but slowing innovation is not a reasonable option. A tricky catch-22.

iChief’s Samsung tie up is long overdue

The first (proper) week in January always promises a deluge of stories from CES and one opening gambit is a content-based partnership between Samsung and Apple, which should probably have happened much sooner.

Beginning in the Spring, new Samsung Smart TV models will offer iTunes Movies & TV Shows and Apple AirPlay 2 support for Apple customers, while 2018 models will also be made compatible via firmware update. iCultists with Samsung TVs can access their existing iTunes library and browse the iTunes Store to buy or rent new content, while Apple content will also work with Samsung’s Smart TV Services, such as Universal Guide, Bixby and Search.

The iTunes Movies & TV Shows app will feature on Samsung Smart TVs in more than 100 countries, while AirPlay 2 support will be available on Samsung Smart TVs in 190 countries.

On the surface this could be a very positive partnership for Apple and Samsung, both of whom have struggled to make a significant impact when searching for diversified revenues.

“Fascinating move as both companies have struggled to make strides in services,” said independent tech and telco analyst Paolo Pescatore. “Arguably it is a smart strategic move for both companies which underlines the need for companies to work more closely together. Samsung has made numerous failed moved in video services while Apple is still seeking to crack the TV landscape.”

Looking at Apple to begin with, this is a move which should have perhaps happened a while back. Stagnation trends in the devices and hardware segments will not have surprised anyone in the Apple business, this is the reason why CEO Tim Cook has been emphasising gains in the software and services business units so proudly, but it is now abundantly clear the ‘us versus everyone else’ mentality which made Apple great will not work outside its traditional stomping ground.

Apple has seemingly long-defied trends in the technology world by swimming against the ‘open’ euphoria. This mentality dates back to its stubborn but brilliant founder Steve Jobs, who constantly resisted the idea of openness, instead tightly integrated Apple within Apple, creating a closed ecosystem which forces iLifers to buy more Apple products. Back during a 2010 earnings call, Jobs stated “open systems don’t always win”.

When Apple was creating wonderful products, with each new release offering a brilliant new feature, this was enough to ensure the loyalty of customers despite the closed nature of the Apple business. However, innovation in the hardware segment has stalled and the closed mentality does not work in the software and services world. What some proof? Have a look at the profit warning last week.

The profit warning was the first one released by Apple in 15 years, and despite progress being made in the software and services segment, the gains could not compensate for the downturn. Although Cook pointed the finger of blame at a slowing Chinese economy, the team could not convince enough consumers to buy the ludicrously priced flagship devices in other territories either. This is a wider trend in the hardware segment, consumers are extending the lifecycle of current devices, while some are leaning towards second-hand models, but the software and services unit could not fill the $5 billion hole created.

To make the content business work, Apple will have to become a more open company, adopting the culture which it has resisted for so many years, and in Samsung it has an interesting partner.

In Samsung, Apple has found something which its own smart TVs cannot deliver; scale. According to market research firm NPD, Samsung is the leader in the US premium smart TV market (August report), holding 34% market share. Considering just over 43% of Apple’s revenue comes from the Americas, this is potential a very positive catapult to secure additional services revenues from customers. And this is before we’ve even started talking about the other territories.

Samsung is another business which has struggled to make headway with alternative revenue streams, though its prominent position in the premium home electronics space offers an excellent opportunity for the aggregator business model. When looking for new money each business has to decide where it can add value to the ecosystem; sometimes it is offering new products in parallel segments, but occasionally it means helping other businesses achieve their ambitions. Embracing openness could be an excellent move here.

If Apple wants to make any meaningful impact on the software and services industry, it will have to move away from the closed mentality which brought it success in the Jobs era and embrace the idea of collaboration. It will certainly be difficult to redirect such a massive supertanker, but one thing is clear; the faltering hardware segment, as it currently stands, will not support Apple’s indulgent ambitions.

The HTC fall from grace is quite remarkable

In years gone, HTC was one of the most successful and sought-after smartphone brands worldwide, but time has not been kind for the Taiwanese firm as financials for 2018 emerge.

Back in 2012, your correspondent had a One X model HTC and it was a very good phone. Due to a slight malfunction more recently, there was also a couple of months with a second-hand HTC 10. It wasn’t a phone which set the world on fire (although ask Samsung how that went down), but it was a perfectly good device. Unfortunately, it appears the brand is just not doing enough right.

As you can see from the table below, 2018 has not been a kind year as the team brought in revenues of 23.7 billion New Taiwan Dollar (NTD), 61% down on 2017.

Month Revenue Year-on-year comparison
January 3,404 -27.03%
February 2,613 -44.04%
March 2,772 -46.66%
April 2,099 -55.47%
May 2,445 -46.03%
June 2,230 -67.64%
July 1,400 -77.41%
August 1,389 -53.72%
September 1,256 -80.71%
October 1,307 -78.44%
November 1,474 -73.98%
December 1,352 -66.36%
Full year 23,741 -61.78%

All figures in New Taiwan Dollar (millions)

Just as a comparison to previous years, in 2017 HTC brought in revenues of 62.120 billion NTD, 2016 was 78.161 billion NTD and 2015 was 121.684 billion NTD. If you go all the way back to 2012, the team brought in a remarkable 465.795 billion NTD.

Of course, you have to bear in mind the business has offloaded a substantial part of its business to Google for $1.1 billion, most notably c.2000 engineers who were working on the Pixel device anyway and a horde of IP, but HTC is still running as a standalone business. Back in November, Sprint announced it was partnering with Qualcomm and HTC to develop a mobile ‘smart hub’ that will run on 5G next year.

Every now and then it is useful just to look back through the years and remember how different things were. HTC used to be one of the mobile industry’s heavyweights, alas, no more. RIP HTC.

Google wins FCC approval for gesture control tests

Google has finally won regulatory approval from the FCC to start testing the more advanced features of Project Soli, a radar-based motion sensor to allow the user to control devices through gestures.

The approval document, which you can read here, will allow Google’s Advanced Technology and Projects unit greater freedoms in testing the technology, which might look familiar if you are a fan of Tom Cruise’s Minority Report. Just when innovation is grinding to a halt in the smartphone segment, Google’s whacky scientists are working on something which could completely revolutionise the smartphone.

Project Soli initially came to be in 2015, though due to concerns the radar system would interfere with other spectrum users, power levels were limited. However, the waiver now allows Google to play with higher power levels while users can also operate the devices when on airplanes.

The idea is of course very simple. Radar sensors are in a small chip which features in the device, which detect hand and finger movements with high accuracy. Various different movements could be used to operate different features of a smart device, perhaps making the touch-screen redundant in the future. Check out the video at the bottom of the page for more details.

Interestingly enough, the FCC has not only decided Google is allowed to pursue this technology as there are no technical reasons not to do so, but also believes this project could be in the public interest.

“We further find that grant of the waiver will serve the public interest by providing for innovative device control features using touchless hand gesture technology,” the document states.

The last few years have been a bit of a baron time for smartphone innovation. Apple’s recent financial bombshell perfectly demonstrates this; not even Apple can rise above the mediocrity of innovation and grow revenues. This sort of innovation might just be what the smartphone segment needs.

And perhaps this is a sign of things to come; who knows what a smartphone or smart communications device will look like in the future. Maybe users will revert back to having two separate devices; one specialised for entertainment and the other for communications. With gesture control and voice recognition technologies, is there any need for a screen if communications is the purpose? And if you don’t need a screen, do you need such a big battery? Devices could become significantly smaller and much more power efficient.

Over the last 20 years, mobile communications devices have changed significantly. From big to small and back to big, foldable, slidable and closable, through colourful, sleek and offensive, the concept of the mobile device has always been changing. Who knows what it will actually look like in ten years’ time…

AT&T won’t let Verizon have its moment in the 5G limelight

Just a day after Verizon announced plans with Verizon to launch a 5G-compatible device in the H1 2019, AT&T has romped in to steal attention with its own, pretty similar announcement.

It must sound like a bit of an echo, but during the first six months of 2019, AT&T will bolster its 5G devices line-up with a Samsung smartphone. This is the second device which will be available through the AT&T portfolio, having announced a 5G Mobile Hotspot, in partnership with Netgear back in October.

“5G is going to be about more than just a network,” said David Christopher, President of AT&T Mobility and Entertainment. “Customers will eventually be able to connect in near real-time to unforeseen possibilities. Together with Samsung, we plan to bring the best in technology and innovation to our customers. The future we imagine with 5G is just beginning, and it is a great time to be a consumer.”

For those die-hard AT&T/Samsung fans, a little bit of cold water might have to be poured onto the excitement. AT&T has claimed to have installed 5G network equipment in the 12 markets it plans to go live in before the end of 2018, though coverage is likely to be incredibly limited in the first few months. By mid-2019, AT&T plans to bring the 5G bonanza to a further seven cities across the US, though as with the original 12 take the 5G coverage claims with a pinch of salt.

The 5G race in the US is certainly heating up, and while some might complain the buzz has dimmed into more of a nauseating drone, at least there is something to actually shout about nowadays. Aside from Samsung getting into bed with two hardcore rivals, Motorola is working with Verizon for its own device, while LG has plans to launch its own 5G compatible device on Sprint’s network, also for the first half of 2019. Apple, however, is choosing to sit out the H1 2019 race, suggesting its own 5G compatible device will not be ready until 2020.

Despite the inevitable short-comings when it comes to coverage, 5G is pretty close to becoming an actual thing in the hands of the consumer.

Sprint partners with Qualcomm and HTC on new 5G device

Sprint has announced a new partnership with Qualcomm and HTC to develop a mobile ‘smart hub’ that will run on 5G next year.

Details are relatively thin for the moment, though the term ‘smart hub’ perhaps suggests it will be some form of mobile hot spot. This is the second 5G-specific partnership Sprint has announced in the devices realm, after partnering with LG to develop a 5G-compatible smartphone for its in-progress network. This device might be one of the first to reach the market next year.

“We’re excited to continue building our 5G device portfolio and announce another way our customers can be among the first to experience Sprint 5G next year,” said John Saw, Sprint CTO. “This innovative product will allow customers on the go, at work or at home to enjoy Sprint 5G on multiple devices with incredibly fast connectivity for content sharing, mobile gaming, entertainment and so much more.”

“We are thrilled to be working closely with Sprint on this innovative new design,” said Cher Wang, HTC CEO. “This collaboration brought our cutting-edge technology together with Sprint’s industry-leading 5G network to create the next generation smart devices.”

With Sprint’s 5G network set to launch in the first half of 2019, we might not have to wait long to find out more details. What we do know right now is the data device will be powered using Qualcomm’s Snapdragon X50 5G modem, allowing it Gigabit LTE and 5G capabilities.

Apple shares fall 5% on weak forecast

With Apple pointing the finger at fluctuating currency, poor performance in emerging markets and supply issues, its busiest quarter might not be as busy as investors had hoped.

While CEO Tim Cook has defended the soundness of the supply chain, worries over whether the business can keep up with demand over the final quarter leading into Christmas seem to have spooked investors. Combined with warnings over performance in emerging markets as well as volatile currencies around the world, the team has stated it might miss guidance over the next three months, sending share price down 5% in afterhours trading.

“The emerging markets that we’re seeing pressure in are markets like Turkey, India, Brazil, Russia,” said Cook. “These are markets where currencies have weakened over the recent period. In some cases, that resulted in us raising prices and those markets are not growing the way we would like to see.”

India should be seen as quite a worry for the iChief’s as while the country has been undergoing its own digital revolution over the last 18 months, Apple seem to be missing out on the biggest rewards. With India now being the second-largest smartphone market in the world, but with half the penetration of China, the opportunities are clear. Despite attention from Apple, it’s opening new production facilities and shops across the country, according to data from Canalys it is yet to break into the top-five smartphone brands.

Shipments in India across the most recent quarter dropped by 1%, though Xiaomi grew 31.5% year-on-year to claim the number on spot, at the expense of Samsung, where shipments dropped 1.6%. Vivo, Oppo and Micromax complete the top five, while the ‘others’ saw shipments decrease 34%. The Chinese brands seem to have found the right recipe to appeal to the Indian user, while Apple is still searching for the sweet spot.

“To give you a perspective in of some detail, our business in India in Q4 was flat,” said Cook. “Obviously, we would like to see that be a huge growth. Brazil was down somewhat compared to the previous year. And so I think, or at least the way that I see these, is each one of the emerging markets has a bit of a different story, and I don’t see it as some sort of issue that is common between those for the most part.”

One market where this isn’t the case is China, with the business growing 16% year-on-year. On the money side of things, it certainly is a different story. Total revenues across the business grew to $62 billion, an increase of 20% over the same period in 2017, though guidance is not as positive. Cook expects Apple to pocket between $89 billion and $93 billion over the next three months, though Wall Street has generally been hoping $93 billion would be the bottom end of the guidance.

Looking at the explanation, CFO Luca Maestri has pointed to four areas. Firstly, the team have launched products in reverse order compared to last year. Secondly, with many international currencies depreciating against the US dollar, Maestri anticipates a $2 billion headwind as a result. Thirdly, due to the number of products Apple has pumped into the market, the team is nervous about supply/demand. And finally, at the macroeconomic level in some emerging markets consumer confidence is not as high as it was 12 months ago.

Heading back to the positives, Apple is making more money now than it was a year ago. Despite there being no shipment growth in any of the major product lines (iPhone was flat year-on-year, iPad was down 6% and Mac was down 2%), Apple is still a money making machine. iPhone revenue increased 29% thanks to ridiculously high unit costs, while the services business was up 17%. This is an area which will be of significant interest to investors, as there is only so much Cook and co. can increase the price of iPhones to compensate for flat growth.

As part of the services division, the App Store has been trundling along positively, though with companies like Netflix and Fortnite stating they would be circumnavigating both the App Store and Google Play, all involved will hope this does not encourage others to do the same. Cook pointed out that the largest developer only account for 0.3% of revenues at the App Store, losing one or two won’t matter, but if the trend spreads too far the product might find troubling times ahead.

Overall, Apple is still in an incredibly dominant position, though the inability to capitalise on opportunities in the developing markets should be a slight worry.

Apple Financials

Apple Products

Google ups the ante with Europe by charging Android manufacturers for its mobile products

Under pressure to be seen to comply with an EU antitrust ruling, Google has indicated that the only way to do so is to start charging for what was previously given away.

Earlier this year Europe fined Google €4.3 billion for abusing its dominance in the smartphone OS market to force the bundling of its commercial products such as search onto every Android phone. The EC found this practice to be anticompetitive since it made it harder for any other apps to compete and this reduced consumer choice.

Accompanying its inevitable decision to appeal the fine, Google CEO Sundar Pichai insisted that the existence of Android has in fact led to more consumer choice, not less – an assertion proven by all the great Android devices you can buy. Regardless Google was given 90 days to comply with the ruling or face further fines, and we now know the nature of that compliance.

In a blog post Google VP of Platforms and Ecosystems Hiroshi Lockheimer detailed the concessions Google will be making in Europe while the appeals process is underway. In essence Google will now start charging any Android device OEM that ships into the EU for the use of its mobile apps. Furthermore it will charge separately for search and Chrome, since they’re the apps that seemed to upset the EC and, as a consequence, OEMs are free to muck about with Android itself if they want.

The justification given for this move is simple: Google needs to make up for the revenue it will lose by not being able to bundle its mobile apps with Android. “Since the pre-installation of Google Search and Chrome together with our other apps helped us fund the development and free distribution of Android, we will introduce a new paid licensing agreement for smartphones and tablets shipped into the EEA. Android will remain free and open source,” said the blog.

An underlying strategy, however, may be to illustrate Google’s point about all the benefits consumers have derived from Android. By charging what it previously gave away for ‘free’ (while making loads of money via the traffic through its mobile apps, of course), Google is saying that the consequence of the EU’s ruling will be for everything to become more expensive.

This is ultimately a fight over Google’s underlying business model of given stuff away and then monetising its users. But the EC does have a point the use of a dominant position to stifle competition via forced bundling and, as the former head of Internet Explorer and Windows at Microsoft notes in the tweet below, has a strong tradition of challenging this sort of thing.

One final thing to consider against Google’s claim that, if it can’t insist all its other stuff comes bundled with Android, it has to seek direct compensation is the matter of China. Google apps have been unbundled from Android there for some time and Google doesn’t seem to be getting any compensation there. If it can do that in China, why can’t it do it elsewhere?

Mobile processing efficiency is key to sustaining secondary device market success

Telecoms.com periodically invites third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this piece Alan Bentley, President, Global Strategy at Blancco looks at the success of the secondary device market but warns against data security complacency.

The secondary smartphone market continues to grow, delivering new revenues and new opportunities to every one of its stakeholders. In fact, according to Counterpoint Research, the market for refurbished smartphones is now growing faster than for new smartphones. A staggering 140 million used devices have now been collected for redistribution. Last year, according to Persistence Market Research, the secondary device market was worth US$19 billion, and is set to more than double in size and reach a valuation of US$44 billion by 2026. That’s impressive scale for a process that started to keep used old devices out of landfill (which remains a critical focus for the secondary market today).

Big business, but time is money

From an operator perspective, the secondary device market is big business. Revenues extracted by unlocking the latent value of old devices is one of the few revenue streams available to them which continues to grow. This is a big deal given how hard new revenues are to come by, and the cannibalisation that has impacted many of their core service revenues from voice, data and messaging.

Operators and OEMs that manage device BuyBack processes, either directly or through partners, can, on average, extract between $100 and $300 per smartphone according to its model, age and condition at the point of upgrade. Realising optimal value depends on how efficiently an operator can process a used smartphone. It begins at the point of collection, goes through diagnosis, repair and refurbishment before being prepared for re-distribution. Put simply, with mobile device processing, time is money. The longer it takes to process a used smartphone, the more of its latent value it loses. Operators, OEMs and the third-party logistics providers that serve them both are all incentivised, therefore, to make marginal gains at every opportunity to protect optimal value.

Efficiency matters, but not as much as customer data integrity

Operators, OEMs and third-party logistics providers have fine tuned mobile processing. While the process from device collection to re-distribution is very involved, it is not unusual to be able to process several hundred devices each day. Typically, the process includes automated device testing, identifying key locks and determining device value. It then quickly and securely erases data stored on each device using properly scoped hardware and configuration, all in line with the necessary certification guidelines. Ideally, each device will then be given a certified tamper-proof audit trail, backed by a certification of data erasure.

With so much focus on operational efficiency, there will always be a temptation to dispense with some of these key steps. At present, the secondary device market is light on regulation. In North America, the leading global market for used smartphone collection, there are the R2 standards. These unite the leading carriers, OEMs and third-party logistics providers behind some common rules – but they are not a mandate, merely guidelines. In truth, pretty much every player in the secondary device ecosystem is R2 compliant – they have to be in order to do business with each other. However, R2 guidelines were not created with the collection and processing of used smartphones in mind, leaving many to consider their relevance and applicability to the larger, much more significant ecosystem that exists today. For example, R2 states that performing a ‘factory reset’ on a device is sufficient in ensuring all data is fully erased. In some cases this is true, in many others it isn’t.

Not a time for complacency

Without a common, mandated and regulated rule book for smartphone processing best-practice, the ecosystem will be subject to abuse and malicious attack. Let’s be clear, the secondary device market has functioned perfectly well up until now. R2 and other standards have done their job, consumer data has, in the main, been preserved. The current ecosystem is made up of multiple stakeholders, who collect devices from various touchpoints and redistribute them to many other parties. Since the speed of device processing is the only critical success factor, and as more and more devices flood the market, the chances of data breaches or issues related to data misuse will become more and more likely.

If operators or OEMs want a lesson in the damage caused by data breaches and the misuse of customer data, they need only look at Facebook. Operators have built a strong sense of trust with their customers – they have historically been reluctant to offer freemium services in return for customer data that can then be resold. This leaves them ideally placed to capitalise on this goodwill, create a raft of new offers and partnerships and target their customers with new digital services. This opportunity will only exist if they remain diligent to all threats and focused on the responsible management of customer data. The secondary device market remains an amazingly lucrative and exciting opportunity for everyone, but only if it retains full consumer confidence – confidence that is built on trust and data integrity.

 

alan-bentley (002)Alan Bentley is President, Global Strategy at Blancco. He joined the company in October 2016 as VP of Sales, EMEA and more recently, has taken on the role of President of Global Strategy. In this role, he is responsible for overseeing sales efforts globally. As an industry veteran, Alan is responsible for leading the sales teams to develop sustainable and scalable revenue growth. Since joining the company, Alan has worked closely with Blancco’s many customers and partners to implement data erasure solutions to mitigate security risks and ensure regulatory compliance. This gives him a unique insight into the market and business requirements driving the needs of today’s businesses.