US is winning the 5G speed race

Although there is a lot more to 5G than ‘bigger, faster, meaner’ download speeds, the US has bragging rights currently when it comes to the fastest download speeds.

According to the latest analysis from Opensignal, 5G is boosting maximum downloads in all eight markets where the connectivity euphoria has been launched, aside from Australia that is. It’s a very crude measure of success, but it is something which the telcos will want to shout about.

As you can see from the graphic below, there is certainly an increase in speed, though this is hardly a good measure when you consider very few consumers even touch the maximum speeds promised.

Opensignal graphic

Leading the pack is the US with maximum downloads speeds of 1815 Mbps, and by somewhat of a clear margin, though both Switzerland and South Korea have entered into the holy land of gigabit speeds. Perhaps the strangest statistic to make note of is the decrease in maximum speeds in Australia.

The lead which the US has established should come as little surprise when you consider the spectrum being utilised. Telcos in the US are already able to use mmWave spectrum for 5G, whereas European counterparts are utilising the mid-band spectrum, which sacrifices some speed to improve geographical coverage.

Looking at the UK, which currently sits bottom of the rankings, there is perhaps something for Three to shout about. Opensignal suggests speeds here might be impacted by the fact EE only has 40 MHz of relevant spectrum. Three has been shouting about its 100 MHz of contiguous spectrum in the 5G bands, claiming it is best positioned to deliver the 5G experience, and this analysis perhaps supports this claim.

And to address some of the speed differences between Opensignal and the figures which are being quoted by the telcos, this analysis is being done in the real world. Consumers are asked to download the Opensignal app, allowing the team to assess speeds in the real-world, with a range of different devices (manufacturer and condition) and a variety of applications.

But you also have to take into account these speeds are not realistic whatsoever; its nothing but a PR plug for the ‘creatives’ in the marketing department to make use of. Let’s take Australia as an example.

According to this analysis, Australian telcos can achieve a maximum download speed of 950 Mbps for 4G. However, as you can see from the graphic below, reality is far from the maximum achieved in perfect test conditions.

Opensignal 4G graphic

Although we are comparing apples and pears here, the theory is the same. Real-world experience is entirely different from the maximum speeds which the telcos boast about; this has been true for the 4G world and it would be perfectly reasonable to assume the same for the 5G era.

Fundamentally, this means very little for the moment. Coverage is incredibly limited while reality will be very different when more users hit the network. You also have to take into account European operators do not have access to the high-band spectrum which will deliver the monstrous speeds promised.

That said, the variety of speeds perhaps give an indication of the success of deployment strategies. It is certainly early days in the 5G era, but the US has claimed the first accolade when it comes to the dated ‘bigger, faster, meaner’ mentality which has governed the telcos for years.

Vodafone UK edges in front with ‘wider pipe’ approach to 5G

It’s always difficult to offer a winning position before all hands have been shown, but Vodafone looks to have stretched a nose ahead in the UK 5G race.

For the moment, we can only really judge two of the four 5G propositions in the UK, though there have also been hints from Three. With EE launching its 5G assault last month, and Vodafone switching on this week, it does seem that the latter has re-found its mojo and could challenge leadership positions in the UK connectivity standings.

As it stands, O2 and EE are sitting very comfortably in the number one and two spots respectively. With 36% and 33% market share for mobile subscriptions, according to Ovum’s WCIS, Vodafone is a distant third with 20% and Three falls away with 11% in fourth. However, that can all change very quickly, it wasn’t long ago Vodafone was the clear market leader.

Looking at the current offerings from the UK MNOs, Vodafone does look to have a more attractive offering. On the subsidised handsets front, the two are pretty much on par with Vodafone being a little bit cheaper. However, the SIM-only offering might grab the attention of a lot of people.

This is a model which we think is much more suited in the 5G era. If you believe the technologists, delivering data over 5G networks is cheaper than 4G. This is down to efficiency gains on the spectrum front, as well as improvements to antenna and the introduction of new technologies such as Massive MIMO. If it is becoming cheaper to give data to the increasingly insatiable consumer, why not offer unlimited.

Tiering on speeds is a very interesting approach. Data usage is going up for every demographic, such is life as more aspects become digitised, but the variety of ways people consume that data is becoming increasingly varied. Some will only use the internet for browsing, some focus on video consumption and others are gamers. Each different experience can be satisfied by different speed limits.

What will need to be done over the next couple of weeks and months is educating the consumer. Most consumers think faster is always better, but sometimes this is not the case. The majority of consumers could get by with mobile connectivity of 10-20 Mbps, but many think they need the fastest possible connection.

If you are in an urban setting and not able to use the internet on your device properly, the immediate assumption is that speeds are not fast enough. This might be the case, but another explanation is that there are too many people attempting to connect through the same cell site. This is network congestion, its not necessarily anything to do with speed, but too many people are clogging up the digital highway.

This is where 5G can add benefits over 4G. Think of the ‘internet’ as a water pipe. Not only does 5G make the water flow faster, it makes the pipe wider to allow more water to flow through it. This should address the network congestion challenge in various places if more people are connecting more devices to the same cell sites.

With this concept in mind, Vodafone has built the speed-tiered options; all you have to do is work-out how you use your phone, decide on a suitable speed and then you never have to worry about using up your data allocation ever again.

The one criticism we have is the pricing, which you can see below:

Speed limit 2 Mbps 10 Mbps Fastest possible
Price £23 £26 £30

On the lower end of the scale, the 2 Mbps tier, we believe Vodafone has charged a bit too much. And on the upper-end, the telco probably could have charged more. The strategy appears to be gearing as many people as possible to the middle tier which effectively undermines the concept of having experience designed tiers in the first place.

The success of this initiative will entirely depend on whether Vodafone can educate the consumer on the basics on connectivity experience. The water pipe analogy is a good one to explain the difference between 5G and 4G, though it would also help to inform users of how much speed is required to do what.

How much do you need to use WhatsApp, watch YouTube or play Harry Potter; Wizards Unite, for example. The general consumer in the UK will not know the answer to this question, and unless they do, this Vodafone strategy will likely fail.

BT Mobile waiting until later in the year to jump on EE 5G network

UK operator BT, which duplicates the EE network via its own-branded MVNO for some reason, is waiting until the autumn to offer 5G to its subscribers.

Amid great fanfare BT-owned EE formally launched its 5G network at the end of May, but it has taken until July for BT to announce its own move. The only guidance BT is offering its subscribers is that they can expect to have access to the wonders of 5G sometime in the autumn. This implies the launch is likely to slip towards November as otherwise you’d expect a more precise commitment.

“We’re bringing together the best fibre and mobile connections to help keep our customers connected, both on the go and at home,” said CEO of BT’s Consumer division (which includes EE) Marc Allera. “Launching 5G for BT customers will give them the opportunity to experience the fastest mobile speeds in the busiest areas of the UK, and our BT Plus customers will have the first opportunity to sign up for 5G.”

So not all BT subscribers will have access to even this delayed offering, with BT apparently concluding 5G might be an effective carrot to entice its customers to upgrade to a premium service. Alternatively they could just switch to EE, get the same mobile network straight away and save themselves the premium. Intriguingly BT doesn’t seem to be using its new stripped-down logo for this 5G announcement. Perhaps it fears it will put people off.

EE feels the sharp-end of the opt-in stick

EE is the latest firm to feel the rising wrath of the Information Commissioner’s Office as it is forced to cough up £100,000 for opt-in violations during 2018.

The messages, which were sent back in early 2018, encouraged customers to use a new feature but also to suggest device upgrades. EE claimed the communications were sent as ‘service messages’, but due to the presence of directing marketing, fell afoul of the guidance on electronic marketing put forward by the ICO.

“These were marketing messages which promoted the company’s products and services,” said Andy White, ICO Director of Investigations. “The direct marketing guidance is clear: if a message that contains customer service information also includes promotional material to buy extra products for services, it is no longer a service message and electronic marketing rules apply.

“EE Limited were aware of the law and should have known that they needed customers’ consent to send them in line with the direct marketing rules. Companies should be aware that texts and emails providing service information which also include a marketing or promotional element must comply with the relevant legislation or could face a fine up to £500,000.”

EE might feel a little bit hard-done by here, though it is a pretty clear violation of the rules.

As these messages contained prompts to earn EE a few extra quid each month, they clearly fall into the marketing category. EE would have to secured opt-in from these customers in the past, or in the case of ‘soft opt-in’, existing customers would have had to buy relevant products and given the opportunity to opt-out.

In this instance, the ICO accepted EE had not knowingly broken the rules, though as it did intentionally send out the emails it did not escape a fine. A second-batch of messages were sent out to those who didn’t engage with the first, which probably didn’t help the EE case.

Although this is a relatively minor fine, we expect to see a lot more of these investigations over the coming months. Rules around privacy and data protection are being toughened up, and the regulators need to be seen enforcing them. This fine might not be significant when you compare it to total revenues at the BT Group, but it is symbolic; we expect a few more of these ‘gestures’ sooner rather than later.

UK telcos ask for clarity sooner rather than later over Huawei – report

The UK’s largest mobile operators are reported getting tired of Government indecision, drafting a letter to Cabinet Secretary Mark Sedwill requesting clarification on the situation.

The BBC is claiming to have seen a draft in which a decision has been urged. As it stands, the MNOs are in the telco version of purgatory. The 5G world is fast approaching, but with the Government getting comfortable on the fence, no-one will want to make any investment decisions, a wrong-turn could prove to be very expensive.

In response to the rumours of such a letter, the UK Government has asked for patience.

“The security and resilience of the UK’s telecoms networks is of paramount importance,” said a Government spokesperson. “We have robust procedures in place to manage risks to national security and are committed to the highest possible security standards.

“The Telecoms Supply Chain Review will be announced in due course. We have been clear throughout the process that all network operators will need to comply with the Government’s decision.”

What is worth noting is the BBC coverage perhaps reflects a sense of urgency which is not felt by the telcos. Having reached out to contacts in the industry, the tone of urgency which has been reflected in the article does not seem to represent the climate for the telcos. It is a sensitive issue, and the message seems to be clear; we’re not going to force the hand of the Government into a speedy decision.

“We do not comment on draft documents,” said a Vodafone spokesperson. “We would ask for any decision regarding the future use of Huawei equipment in the UK not to be rushed but based on all the facts.”

“We are in regular contact with UK Government around this topic, and continue to discuss the impact of possible regulation on UK telecoms networks,” said a BT spokesperson.

That said, a decision needs to come sooner rather than later.

Currently the MNOs are in a bit of a bind. Money needs to be spent and networks need to be built to ensure connectivity in the UK meets the standards demanded of the digital economy. However, as there are so few vendors in this segment of the industry clarification on the Huawei situation is critically important.

Without Huawei, the threat of decreased competition might lead to less attractive commercial terms, which could lead to increased prices for the consumer as telcos drive ROI. Telcos will want Huawei to be included in these talks. Right now, no decisions can be made. If the telcos go forward without Huawei, they might be missing a trick, but if they do and the Supply Chain Review bans the firm, the cost of ‘rip and replace’ would be painful. The telcos are just sitting and waiting.

The outcome of the review has already been potentially leaked, suggesting Huawei would be given the greenlight. This leak from the National Security Council led to former-Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson being sacked, though this is not to say the leak is accurate. Last week, the UK hosted US President Donald Trump, and while there was no eureka moment, who knows what was discussed behind closed doors.

The US is sticking by its anti-Huawei position and has even suggested with-holding access to security data from countries who are exposed to the vendor.

That said, there might have been no material conversations held on this topic over the course of the visit. Theresa May is no-longer the political leader of the UK and Trump might have thought it nothing more than a waste of hot-air. This is perhaps one of the biggest issues which the country is facing at the moment; who knows who is going to be leading the Government over the next couple of months.

The Tory party members are going to be choosing the next leader of the Conservative party over the next few weeks, and the tone of 10 Downing Street might change. May seemed to have a much more internationalist approach to politics, though certain candidates are much cosier with the White House. Bookies favourite Boris Johnson is certainly chummier than most with the US President, though others will be in deeper conversations with US delegations than some. This could have an impact on the relationship with China in the long-term, and subsequently, on any decisions made surrounding Huawei.

The consequence of this decision is not only impacting the future of networks in the UK, but also the past. Yes, telcos are reluctant to spend now, but any decision banning Huawei would result in ‘rip and replace’ programmes. Vodafone has already stated it has Huawei equipment on 38% of base stations around the UK and having to replace RAN equipment would set its 5G ambitions back two years. Telcos would also have to consider 4G investments made over the last couple of years.

Although the other telcos have not been as forth-coming with their exposure to Huawei equipment, it would be a fair assumption the vendor’s kit is scattered throughout the network. This is not just a challenge for Vodafone or EE alone, this is an industry-wide worry.

This is not to say the UK would turn into a massive not-spot, but it would have severe implications on the connectivity ambitions of the country.

Some might have expected a decision from the Supply Chain Review in May, but we are still waiting. External factors have perhaps taken priority, the next Prime Minister and the Trump State Visit for example, but that will come as little consolidation for the telcos who are prepping investments.

The UK should not rush this decision, but the longer it leaves the telcos in purgatory the more the country slips behind in the 5G race. Uncertainty is the enemy of telcos and who knows which way this decision will go.

EE spares no expense in hyping official 5G launch but coverage is mixed

UK mobile operator EE has finally flicked on the 5G switch in six cities but not everyone is as excited about it as Stormzy.

To commemorate 5G being switched on EE floated a stage out into the middle of the river Thames and put rapper Stormzy on it to perform a special set that culminated in warm sentiments towards EE and 5G, which you can see below. “Big up EE, thank you for letting me launch your 5G network in the UK,” said Stormzy. “Tonight was sick, I’m honoured to be part of history.” His agent is presumably no less pleased.

“We wanted to mark the arrival of the UK’s first 5G network with something spectacular,” said Marc Allera, CEO of BT’s consumer business. “Tonight, we made history, not only by becoming the first network to launch 5G in the UK, but also using 5G to live stream this event to thousands of fans across the UK. Stormzy lit up the Thames and his fans’ faces with the energy, passion and charisma that he always brings to his live shows.”

As previously indicated, 5G was switched on in bits of London, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Belfast, Birmingham and Manchester. Apparently this shiny new 5G tech was used to not just power the performance but beam it to EE stores in the other launch cities in order to create a 360-degree VR experience.

Stormzy kept the crowd rapt with this one-off show, set against the iconic backdrop of London’s Tower Bridge,” gushed the EE press release. “First things first he set the evening’s tone, rising up on stage as night fell to an overwhelming ovation from the buoyant crowd, which included competition winners from across the UK.” Stormzy went on to announce he was launching an ‘EE 5G ting’ apparently.

EE also found a further ally in the unlikely form of state broadcaster BBC. The two claim to have ‘successfully made the UK’s first live TV contribution over a public 5G connection’, in which an outside broadcast was beamed back to BBC HQ over 5G. This marks the first time a public 5G network has been used by a production team for a live TV programme, we’re told.

“This is an excellent example of how the BBC experiments with cutting-edge technology to improve how we make programmes,” said Matthew Postgate, Chief Technology and Product Officer at the BBC. “5G is a hugely interesting area for us to explore, with potential to reduce the cost and complexity of outside broadcasts, and as a way of delivering content to audiences in the future. The internet will play a bigger role in broadcasting and we’re pioneering the techniques, standards and ways of working to truly take advantage of it.”

The mainstream UK media seems to have been broadly as accommodating as the beeb in their coverage of the launch, but not everyone is so unconditionally upbeat. “The rollout of 5G is a welcome step forward, however there’s no reason for most people to rush out and upgrade to a 5G device just yet,” said Alex Tofts of Broadband Genie. “Coverage will remain limited for some time, and the cost of being an early adopter is high. Once more networks deploy 5G and coverage improves, the cost will fall as competition rises.

“But while the potential of 5G is exciting we can’t forget that UK network operators still have an obligation to provide 4G signal to 95% of the UK by 2022. 5G has a lot of promise but the operators should not lose focus on ensuring that coverage for existing technology continues to improve, especially in rural locations where mobile broadband can be used to plug the gaps in fixed line broadband access.”

Ingo Flömer, VP of Business Development and Technology at Cobham Wireless, is also concerned about coverage. “5G will undoubtably unlock a range of exciting new consumer and business use cases,” he said. “However, the new connectivity standard fails to address a more pressing problem: the lack of reliable mobile connectivity in many under-connected areas of the UK.

“Not-spots don’t only exist in villages and rural areas of the country; getting 4G mobile coverage is still a massive challenge for subscribers on major over ground rail routes, transport tunnels, and in infrastructure like sports stadiums, airports and music venues. 5G might present lucrative business and consumer cases, yet there’s a lot of revenue still to be unlocked by deploying 4G. In-stadium services to enhance the fan experience, for example, or ad-supported media and entertainment mobile streaming on commuter trains.”

“There has been something of a rush among operators to claim 5G leadership, in a bid to avoid being a perceived laggard,” said Dr William Webb, IEEE Fellow and CEO of Weightless SIG. “This has unfortunately resulted in a number of premature launches. Initially, coverage will be very patchy – some areas in city centres may have a good connection but little elsewhere. For many, there may be no 5G coverage where they live and work for many years.

“Initial tariffs appear to be significantly higher than 4G, which looks unappealing given the limited 5G coverage. The basic 5G package has 5GB of data. If the promise of 200Mb/s is delivered on – and 5G is aiming for much higher – then this entire monthly allowance will last a total of 200 seconds!

“The only real benefit here is that 5G networks will be virtually empty, allowing congestion-free communications. This is a big advantage when you consider in places such as Waterloo, Kings Cross or other mainline train stations. While lower congestion is a valuable benefit, there is no sign of the services or applications that will deliver the well-documented changes to the way that we live and work that some have promised.”

“It will probably take two or three years for networks to settle down and deliver a solid performance. Only then will we see coverage become reliable and widespread enough to impact those who live or work in cities, and for handsets to be price-comparable with 4G. If EE continues at its current rollout rate of 100 base stations per month, it will take 16 years to upgrade its entire network.”

Every new generation of mobile technology suffers from an over-promising problem, but it’s arguably worse than ever with 5G. Everyone knows the full benefits of 5G are still years away, but that’s of no concern to the marketing departments of operators keen to capitalise on this once-in-a decade-opportunity. EE has done a great job on the hype, now let’s see how it does on the substance.

 

Vodafone and EE 5G tariffs point towards a new form of digital divide

If the technology industry wants 5G to change the world, placing prohibitive pricing on data tariffs is a strange way to go about it.

The count-down clock to 5G is heading towards the small numbers, and now Vodafone customers will be able to pre-order 5G-ready devices and decide on what tariffs they are able to afford. Unfortunately for some, the prices might prove to be too much of a premium for wallets to stomach.

Devices and various different tariffs are now available for pre-order through the Vodafone website.

Tariff Samsung Galaxy S10 5G Xiaomi Mi MIX 3 5G
5 GB Red Extra £149 upfront, £58 monthly £99 upfront, £50 monthly
15 GB Red Extra £99 upfront, £62 monthly £99 upfront, £54 monthly
30 GB Red Extra £49 upfront, £66 monthly £49 upfront, £58 monthly
60 GB Red Extra £49 upfront, £70 monthly £49 upfront, £62 monthly
25 GB Red Entertainment £99 upfront, £69 monthly £49 upfront, £61 monthly
50 GB Red Entertainment £49 upfront, £73 monthly £49 upfront, £65 monthly
100 GB Red Entertainment £49 upfront, £77 monthly £49 upfront, £69 monthly

All contracts set at 24 months

What is missing from the above table is a nod to Huawei. Vodafone has hit the pause button on devices from the under-fire Chinese brand. As with EE, Huawei’s 5G phone will not be sold through the Vodafone website for pre-order. It would appear this will be the case until the difficulties with the operating system and ecosystem are ironed out.

Despite these complications, the prices are what the prices are.

“Given its high-profile battle with EE to lead in 5G, I expected Vodafone’s initial tariffs to be punchier,” said Kester Mann of CCS Insight. “The entry £50 offer includes just 5 GB of data; on a 5G network, customers could quickly burn through that.”

Mann is absolutely correct; 5 GB will not last long given the promise of the 5G ecosystem and the usecases envisioned. However, upgrading to bulkier tariffs is perhaps cost prohibitive, potentially creating a new digital divide.

As it stands, the price is prohibitive for some. £52 as a starting point is a high barrier to entry. It seems only the privileged will be comfortable with spending so much on a connectivity contract, creating a society of ‘haves’ and ‘have nots’ and another potential digital divide.

Although there have been promises 5G tariffs will be priced on similar levels to 4G, the premium should come as little surprise. People will be prepared to pay for bragging rights.

It should also be noted EE has priced the connectivity options at the same levels. Vodafone have slightly undercut EE for 5G tariffs, but not by much. This is perhaps a situation which we should have expected. Until all four MNOs are on the market with a 5G proposition, threatening to steal valuable postpaid subscriptions, the price will remain lofty.

Tariff OnePlus 7 Pro 5G Samsung Galaxy S10 5G Oppo Reno 5G
30 GB, one swappable £64 a month, £50 upfront £74 a month, £10 upfront £59 a month, £50 upfront
30 GB, two swappables £69 a month, £50 upfront £79 a month, £10 upfront £69 a month, £50 upfront
60 GB, two swappables £74 a month, £30 upfront £84 a month, £10 upfront £69 a month, £30 upfront
60 GB, one swappable £69 a month, £30 upfront £79 a month, £10 upfront £69 a month, £30 upfront
120 GB, three swappables £79 a month, £10 upfront £89 a month, £10 upfront £74 a month, £10 upfront
100 GB, two swappables £74 a month, £10 upfront £84 a month, £10 upfront £69 a month, £10 upfront
10 GB, two swappables £59 a month, £170 upfront £69 a month, £130 upfront £54 a month, £170 upfront
10 GB, one swappable £59 a month, £70 upfront £69 a month, £30 upfront £54 a month, £70 upfront
10 GB, two swappables £64 a month, £70 upfront £74 a month, £30 upfront £59 a month, £70 upfront

All contract set at 24 months

As you can see, the prices are not consistent with the overall rhetoric of the industry. For many years, the industry has preached of democratizing connectivity, while 5G was supposed to be a technology which benefitted the masses.

At the moment, the risk of a digital divide is very apparent. The rich will get the benefits while the poor remain in the 4G-era. While the genuine 5G usecases are yet to emerge, this is not necessarily an issue. 5G offers little more than increased speeds right now, a premium which isn’t really needed with the applications and services which are currently on the market.

Over the next 6-12 months, Three and O2 will enter the fray with their own networks. This should cause the price of 5G connectivity to tumble. Hopefully at least, as the current state-of-play is a connectivity world which has been designed for the privileged.

EE 5G hits the ground running

Sneaking in-front of Vodafone to debut on May 30, EE’s 5G proposition will be launched across six cities in the UK with a range of different devices and interesting bundling options.

While the launch of the network was announced last week, BT Consumer CEO Marc Allera gave much needed colour to the deployment plans at a media event in London and to be fair to BT and EE, it does look pretty impressive.

From today, customers will be able to pre-order bundles from EE as well as choose from multiple devices. The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G will of course be one of the options, though customers will also be privy to exclusive deals with the Samsung Fold, Oppo Reno 5G and the LG V50 ThinkQ, as well as Huawei’s FWA device and the HTC 5G Smart Hub.

While all of the devices certainly promise a lot, the LG approach is perhaps the most interesting. The device itself is pretty much as you would expect, though a separate module is also included, allowing the device to be clipped in to add an extra screen (as you can see below). Head of LG Mobile UK Andrew Coughlin said the product has been designed with multi-taskers in mind, with each screen working independently of the other.

The device also has the potential to open up entirely new experiences when it comes to gaming.

LQ Images

What you will not see over the next few months is a Huawei device launched in partnership with EE. Allera suggested the pause button has been hit on this relationship, due to the difficulties the firm is facing with its Android licence. If EE cannot guarantee performance of the device throughout the customers mobile contract, it will not partner with Huawei.

But onto the launch itself, six cities will experience the 5G euphoria on Day One, with another 10 added to the mix over the remainder of 2019. Building on the already completed work, EE plans to upgrade 100 base stations to 5G a month, taking the total to 1500 by the end of 2019.

“Today is Day One of our 5G journey, we are going to be the first in the UK and one of the first in Europe to bring our customers 5G,” said Allera.

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Always connected is not a new concept from EE, though it would not be a surprise to see the message ramped up over the next couple of months. With 4G, broadband, wifi and, soon enough, 5G, EE has a lot of connectivity assets to shout about. When you combine these different segments with the largest geographical 4G coverage of all the UK MNOs, this is a selling point which would genuinely interest our internet-obsessed society.

That said, advertisements will need a bit of ‘sexing up’ if they are to catch the attention of the mass market.

On the speeds side, it does look like EE will be launching its 5G network with the ambition of reaching 200 Mbps. However, the message will be more focused on reliability and consistent experience as opposed to peak speeds.

“Peak speed might be the headline, but it is not the story,” said Allera.

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Creative tariffs and bundling are where EE might be able to attract the most attention. 5G customers will not only gain access to faster download speeds and more reliable connections but will get the option to choose from various different zero-rating options to make the most of the connectivity euphoria. These options can be swapped out as the customer desires.

Finally, EE will be also be the exclusive partner of Niantec for the highly-anticipated follow-up to Pokemon Go; Harry Potter, Wizards Unite. Although Pokemon Go was a bit of a sham when it came to delivering on a genuine augment reality experience, the Harry Potter game looks much more immersive and truer to the definitions of AR. Considering the popularity of Pokemon Go, Niantec could certainly be onto another winner should it be able to nail the AR experience with this new title.

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What is worth noting, is this is only the first phase of the EE 5G strategy. The aim will be to have 5G present in 50 cities across the UK by this time next year, though in the first phase it will only be in the busiest areas. Although the geographical rollout will be quite limited, 8% of base stations will be 5G, these assets will deliver 25% of the total traffic running across the EE network.

The second phase of the deployment, starting in 2022, will see the rollout of EE’s brand new 5G core, as well as the introduction of new spectrum. This will be when the UK will be able to experience a genuine 5G network, with the prospect of cloud gaming, AR and immersive content living up to the promise. The final phase, 2023, will see the introduction of mission critical applications focusing on the low-latency angle of 5G.

Interestingly enough, despite all the criticism faced by Huawei in the press, EE will be launching its 5G proposition with Huawei at the core of the network. This is unavoidable and will only be temporary, EE will gradually phase out Huawei from the core, but it is a fact which has seemingly been overlooked or cleverly managed out of the public domain by the BT PR team.

5G is about to become very real for the consumer and soon enough there will be a battle between the MNOs to fight for attention. EE and Vodafone might be scrapping for the 5G lead right now, but this approach from EE looks very promising.