DT inches towards the 5G dream

The German telecommunications industry is doing everything it can to dispel the stereotype of German efficiency, but Deutsche Telekom is making progress in the 5G world.

When it comes to the connectivity rankings, the Germans do not generally feature towards the top. This is evident in both mobile, with 4G coverage, and broadband. However, at IFA the management team has been pitching its progress, and in fairness, DT has beaten the majority of telcos to the 5G punch.

5G is now live in Germany, with six cities welcoming the connectivity euphoria. A total of 129 5G antennae are now transmitting the super-speed connectivity, though plans are to have 20 cities on the coverage map by the end of 2020. DT is not moving as quickly as some European rivals, the UK telcos for example, though it is progress.

Berlin’s Mitte district is the largest coherent 5G coverage area in Germany, at around six square kilometres, with 66 5G base stations. Currently, work is being done to increase the coverage footprint in five cities, with single, clustered locations being targeted. It does appear to be a slowly, surely approach to 5G, but few will argue with progress.

However, you have to measure this progress against European counterparts. In the UK, three of the four MNOs have launched 5G services. EE, the first to launch, has promised 15 cities by the end of 2019, claiming to add 100 5G base stations to its network each month. In France, although 5G has not launched, Orange is suggesting it now has 352 5G pilot sites around the country. In Spain, Vodafone launched its 5G services in June with base stations in 15 cities across the country.

There are of course pros and cons to the breadth versus depth conversation, but it is always worth placing some context into the situation.

The claim has been made at the IFA conference in Berlin, where DT has also been plugging its broadband ambitions.

“For the first time in many years, we have succeeded in surpassing the range of cable companies with a bandwidth of 50 Mbps,” said Michael Hagspihl, Head of Consumers at Telekom Deutschland.

Broadband is another area where the Germans have been sluggish compared to European averages. According to the FTTH Council Europe, Germany has a fibre penetration rate of 2.3%, considerably behind the leaders such as Spain, Latvia or Sweden, all of which have penetration rates north of 40%. However, progress is being made once again.

DT is claiming its fibre network is the largest in Germany, measuring over 500,000 km in length. It has said more than 30 million households can now access broadband speeds between 50 Mbps and 250 Mbps, with 1.1 million able to purchase connectivity which exceeds 1 Gbps. These numbers are of course houses passed rather than actual connections, but it is a better position than previous years.

Whether the slowly, surely approach is going to be a winning strategy when the awards are handed out in a few years remains to be seen, though Germany is starting to sort out its own house.

Openreach cuts costs by 75% to attract builders to fibre diet

Openreach will be slashing the cost of installing fibre wires in new residential developments of less than 30 plots, as it looks to tempt housing developers onto a fibre diet.

Although it might seem remarkable, house builders are not currently mandated by law to install fibre broadband infrastructure on new premises. Considering the aggressive rhetoric being spouted by the UK Government when it comes to laying future-proofed foundations for the digital economy, it does beggar belief the opportunity to cut corners and ignore fibre is still available to these developers.

The ‘Housing Crisis’ in the UK is one which does attract headlines. The severity of this ‘crisis’ does of course depend on who you are talking to, though in certain regions it is undeniable there is a shortage of properties. All you have to look at the price of a two-bedroom flat in London to understand the pickle some youngsters might be in.

This does present an opportunity for the housing developers to make a profit. During the last quarter, the Office for National Statistics estimated 42,870 new homes were completed, though not all took fibre as default. Around 88% of plots on new builds contracting with Openreach elect fibre, though this number increases to almost 100% for plots of over 30 premises.

However, there are still numerous developers which are not taking fibre as a default position. Openreach suggests 124,000 of the new homes constructed in the UK in 2018 still lack access to ‘superfast’ broadband speeds of 30 Mbps or more. The situation is gradually improving, though there still much work to do.

With this in mind, Openreach is looking to increase the attractiveness of installing fibre connectivity through cutting costs by up-to 75% for multi-dwelling housing developments up to 29 properties.

“Our existing offer already provides huge benefits to both buyers and builders alike, but we wanted to go further and make sure everybody moving into a new build property can enjoy the advantages of Fibre-to-the-Premises broadband,” said Kim Mears, MD of Strategic Infrastructure Development.

“Our new offer provides a low-cost option to housebuilders and we hope it will help encourage the adoption of this future-proof technology across smaller developments so that no-one’s left behind.”

Although internet speeds might seem like an after-thought to some, research from LSE and Imperial College Business School suggests home-owners in London are willing to pay up to 8% above the market value properties in areas offering very fast internet speeds. The benefits of fibre connectivity for housing developers is key, though there are still some who are demonstrating a preference for copper, presenting a problem to the likes of Openreach and Virgin Media; it would be far simpler to connect properties while they are in the construction stages.

The Future Telecoms Infrastructure Review (FTIR) concluded connectivity in new builds was not anywhere near the standard it should be, while the FTTH Council Europe estimates also paint a dreary picture. Fibre penetration is as low as 1.5% across the UK, woefully short of other nations such as Latvia (46.9% penetration), Sweden (43.6%) or Spain (43.6%). Even the lethargic Germany manages to beat the UK with 2.3%.

Moving forward, the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is set to publish its opinion from a recent consultation into the matter, with the intention of making it mandatory for developers to install gigabit-capable connections to all new build developments in the future. This is a step in the right direction, though it does surprise us it has taken until 2019 for such rules to be considered.

The consultation should result in a change to the rules, though whether this goes as far as some would want remains to be seen. It would also be a fair assumption that these new rules would not be implemented immediately.

Openreach might have to use the financial carrot for a bit longer while the slow-moving cogs of government click into place.

Sky and Liberty Global allegedly in talks for full-fibre investment

Sky is reportedly in discussions with Liberty Global to add further fuel to the full-fibre machine which is engulfing the UK at an increasing rapid rate.

After a new company, Liberty Fibre Ltd, was registered with Companies House in the UK last week, parent company Liberty Global has allegedly entered talks with Sky UK to add additional investment to the scheme. According to the Financial Times, with Sky moving away from satellite connectivity for its content proposition, the team are seeking more attractive wholesales terms, with Virgin Media providing a potential alternative.

As it stands, Openreach is the incumbent wholesale partner to Sky. The wholesale giant has enjoyed market dominance in recent years, though numerous ‘alt-nets’ and alternative providers are creating a much more competitive market. Sky is supposedly in talks with Virgin Media to use its fibre network to deliver its broadband and OTT content service, and the creation of another wholesale fibre business would further lessen the dependence on Openreach in the rural locations.

The new company, Liberty Fibre Ltd, will aim to deploy full-fibre networks in locations outside of the main urban areas, the primary focus for the vast majority of network owners. Virgin Media will become the anchor tenant of the network, though should the rumoured discussions continue as planned, Sky would become an investor in the scheme and a second customer.

For Liberty Global, attracting Sky as a customer would be a significant win.

Although it does not own any of its own network assets (fixed or mobile), Sky is one of the most successful broadband providers in the UK. Although Sky has stopped reporting total subscription numbers, most estimates put the total number of broadband customers between 6.2 million and 6.5 million. This would give Sky roughly a 20% market share, even with Virgin Media and second behind BT. Currently, Sky has a fibre penetration of 38%.

The commitment of a heavyweight such as Sky would certainly lesson the financial burden of deploying a fibre network in areas where ROI projections are certainly less attractive than the dense urban environments. The attractiveness of Sky as a customer only increases when you consider the increasingly popular OTT video drive and aggressive fibre broadband marketing campaigns.

Although Sky is still primarily known for being the premium satellite pay-TV content provider in the UK, the OTT proposition, Now TV, is becoming increasingly popular. After being acquired by Comcast, Sky is likely to attract additional advertising revenues from the parent-company to further consolidate an attractive position in the UK.

After years of neglect, the full-fibre market in the UK is gathering momentum very quickly. It is still years behind other nations across the European continent, but the creation of a new fibre wholesale player will add more fuel to the blaze as glass sweeps across the isles. Liberty Fibre Ltd is an interesting idea, and if it can nail Sky as an investor and customer, its prospects will certainly head north.

UK government tries to encourage 5G innovation rural areas

The UK government has set aside £30 million to fund a few winners of a competition to come up with bright ideas about exploiting 5G tech in the countryside.

This marks the latest minor trip to the well that is the National Productivity Investment Fund, a pot of £37 billion in public wedge that is being drip-fed to industry every time the government reckons a certain area of infrastructure could do with a prod in the right direction. 5G and fibre are core national infrastructure topics, as is the development of rural communities, so the government gets two PR wins for the price of one with this announcement – a bargain at £30 million.

“The British countryside has always been a hotbed of pioneering industries and we’re making sure our rural communities aren’t left behind in the digital age,” said Digital Secretary Nicky Morgan. “We’re investing millions so the whole country can grasp the opportunities and economic benefits of next generation 5G technology.

“In modern Britain people expect to be connected wherever they are. And so we’re committed to securing widespread mobile coverage and must make sure we have the right planning laws to give the UK the best infrastructure to stay ahead.”

That latter statement is a nod to ongoing work to give operators better access to places where they can stick their radio gear, which presumably resulted from persistent moaning on the matter from said operators. This could well be especially challenging in rural areas, where land owners are in a strong position to dictate the terms of business.

Among the changes under consideration in this area are:

  • changing the permitted height of new masts to deliver better mobile coverage, promote mast sharing and minimise the need to build more infrastructure;
  • allowing existing ground-based masts to be strengthened without prior approval to enable sites to be upgraded for 5G and for mast sharing;
  • deploying radio equipment cabinets on protected and unprotected land without prior approval, excluding sites of special scientific interest; and
  • allowing building-based masts nearer to roads to support 5G and increase mobile coverage.

“We’re committed to delivering the homes people across the country need, and that includes delivering the right infrastructure such as broadband connectivity and good mobile coverage,” said Minister of State for Housing and Planning, Esther McVey.

“There is nothing more frustrating than moving into your new home to find signal is poor. That’s why we are proposing to simplify planning rules for installing the latest mobile technology – helping to extend coverage and banish more of those signal blackspots, particularly for those living in rural areas.”

Slightly hyperbolic there, Esther, and it’s presumably part of any home-buyer’s due diligence to check the mobile signal when they inspect their prospective purchase, but we get your point. Whether land-owners, farmers, etc agree on the paramount importance of rural mobile connectivity is another matter, but one of the organizations claiming to represent them seems keen.

“The vast potential of the rural economy will only be fulfilled when everyone in the countryside has full mobile connectivity, and we welcome DCMS’s intent to deliver the Prime Minister’s promise of internet access for all,” said Mark Bridgeman, Deputy President of the Country Land and Business Association.

“The current situation, where only 67% of the country can access a decent signal, is unacceptable and government is right to focus on planning reform as a means to removing current barriers but there must also be a balance between the interests of landowners and mobile operators.”

Prospective rural 5G pioneers have a couple of months to apply for a piece of the 30 mil. This sort of thing seems fairly positive on the surface, but it’s debatable how much impact chucking a few mil at a small number of pet projects will have in the great scheme of things. On the flip side any state intervention in private business needs to be treated with caution as the ultimate arbiter of the viability of any business initiative should be the market.

Telco lobby tells BoJo to show his commitment to fibre goals

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson made some waves with his 2025 100% full-fibre broadband objectives in recent weeks, and now the telcos are asking him to prove it’s more than hot air.

In an open letter to the Prime Minister (BoJo), associations representing the telco industry in the UK have asked for more concrete commitments to broadband deployment. The fear from many is that this claim will turn out to be nothing more than campaign promises and political point scoring, BoJo does have a track-record in that area after all.

“We welcome your campaign’s focus on improving digital connectivity,” the letter states. “The nationwide rollout of full fibre broadband is an ambitious challenge, and requires a mix of leadership, pioneering spirit and Government support to be possible.

“The industry stands ready to rise to this challenge, but we need a Prime Minister who can provide the direction, idealism and commitment to fulfil this ambition. We call on you to give a full commitment that your Government will give us the tools we need to deliver future-proof connections across the UK.”

Signed by the Internet Service Providers’ Association, the Federation of Communications Services and the Independent Networks Co-operative Association, this could be seen as a communique which represents every quarter of the communications segments in the UK.

Looking at the specifics, its not necessarily anything new from these associations however…

Starting with the obvious, cash, the letter applauds the financial commitment made by the UK Government in assisting the industry in deploying future-proofed infrastructure, but more needs to be done. £3-5 billion in public funds is a good start, but the regulatory landscape should be addressed to ensure the environment is assistive when driving towards the ambitious goals.

This was the main concern from industry insiders when reacting to BoJo’s accelerated objectives for full-fibre broadband across the UK. The initial target, 2033, was already ambitious according to our conversations, though if anyone is to get anywhere near full-fibre coverage by 2025 the skills shortage and regulatory landscape were urgent challenges in need of address.

This is the crux of the letter to BoJo; sort out the red-tape maze. The fibre tax is an on-going issue, as is access to wayleaves. The latter is a very difficult issue to fix, as while the new Electronic Communications Code grants telcos more power, many landowners are hitting back with lawsuits due to unreasonable conditions imposed on them by the telcos (rent and/or access rights). The bottleneck of legal complications could risk a slow-down in both mobile and broadband deployment; this is an issue which needs addressing quickly.

Another gripe from the associations is focused on new-builds. Again, this is not a new complaint from the industry, but many feel house-builders should be forced to include fibre-connectivity as default through regulation. This might sound like an obvious trick to drive fibre deployment and adoption, but it is an area which is often overlooked, or overshadowed by other conversations.

Finally, the skills shortage has been raised. This is a point which was brought up by industry insiders following the initial pledge by BoJo; how much faster can the telcos go? Broadband deployment is labour intensive work and there are only so many bodies. Virgin Media and Openreach are already hiring extensively, and it is a bit more complicated than throwing a hard-hat on Joe or Jane Bloggs.

As it stands, roughly 7% of the homes across the UK currently have the opportunity to subscribe to full-fibre broadband, though uptake is roughly half of that number to date. To extend full-fibre to all 32 million homes by 2025, industry has suggested it would cost £30 billion, while the workforce would have to be drastically increased. BT has said it would have to hire another 30,000 field engineers to meet the demands of connecting an average of 20,000 a week to stick to the accelerated timeline.

BT CEO Philip Jansen has already come out in support of BoJo’s objectives, but like the associations here, he has suggested there will need to be changes.

“We are ready to play our part to accelerate the pace of roll-out, in a manner that will benefit both the country and our shareholders, and we are engaging with the government and (regulator) Ofcom,” Jansen said.

In order to aide this objective, BT would have to do some rejigging of its own. This might involve a rethink in how CAPEX is allocated, and even a cut to the dividend. But this would only happen if it made economic sense, and do to this, BT presumably needs more than political rhetoric from the PM.

It should come as little surprise telco lobbyists are whispering in the ear of the new Prime Minister, however there are some valid points. 2025 is an incredibly ambitious (some might say ludicrous) objective, though the red-tape maze will need to be trimmed into shape if there is any hope of getting any where near it.

BT CEO calls for more state assistance after delivering flat numbers

UK operator group BT reported a small revenue decline in Q2 2019 and once more fished for public help with its network investment.

In his comments accompanying its quarterly earnings announcement, Chief Exec Philip Jansen acknowledged that BT needs to raise its game across the board and said all the right things about Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s bold ambitions for the fibre rollout. But he also maintained his predecessor’s stance of indicating that he expects the government to materially contribute to the effort.

“In building a better BT for the future we need to be even more competitive,” said Jansen. “We will continue to take decisive action, including on price, to further strengthen our customer propositions and market position, both to respond to any short-term market pressures and to capitalise on longer-term opportunities.

“On network investment, we welcome the government’s ambition for full fibre broadband across the country and we are confident we will see further steps to stimulate investment. We are ready to play our part to accelerate the pace of rollout, in a manner that will benefit both the country and our shareholders, and we are engaging with the government and Ofcom on this.”

The numbers themselves were nothing to write home about, with both revenues and EBITDA declining by 1%. “BT delivered results in line with our expectations for the quarter, with adjusted EBITDA declines in Consumer and Enterprise partly offset by growth in Global,” said Jansen. “We are on track to meet our outlook for the full year.”

It seems that investors were hoping for a bit more, however, with BT’s shares down 4% at time of writing. New Prime Minister Boris Johnson has indicated a greater inclination to spend big than his predecessors and Jansen seems to be challenging him to put his money where his mouth is.

BTQ2 2019 table

Openreach adds another 35 cities to ‘fibre first’ programme

Openreach has announced a further 36 cities and towns which will be upgraded to Fibre-to-the-Premises (FTTP) broadband technology over the next 12 months.

As part of the ‘fibre first’ programme, 74 cities and large towns will undergo extensive upgrade programmes to ensure fibre is a realistic option for broadband services. It might have taken a while to get the UK on-board with the necessity for future-proofed broadband infrastructure, though momentum is gathering.

“We’re pressing ahead with our investment and Openreach engineers are now building in communities all over the country, keeping us on track to deliver against the bigger ambitions we set out in May,” said Clive Selley, MD of Openreach.

“The Government wants to see a nationwide full fibre network and we’re keen to lead the way in helping them achieve that. We know that if it’s going to happen, Openreach will need to be at the front doing the heavy lifting, so we’re working hard to build a commercially viable plan.”

With the continued aggressive push towards fibre broadband throughout the country, the prolonged battle between BT and Ofcom to retain control of Openreach makes much more sense. The telco fought bitterly to keep Openreach in the Group and now with enthusiasm for fibre higher than ever before it is was a justified battle, even if it did negatively impact the relationship with the regulator.

However, things are not all rosy for Openreach.

“One headwind to investment which affects all full fibre builders is business rates, and we’ve been encouraged by the Scottish Government’s move to extend rates relief north of the border,” Selley stated. “I’m convinced that prioritising investment in faster, more reliable and future proof broadband networks will prove to be a no-regrets decision for future generations.”

Complaints over regulation are of course not a new element of the telecommunications industry, though this is one which has been persistent. The industry has been promised changes, though few has been realised to date.

That said, the fibre revolution is catching. New Prime Minister Boris Johnson has pushed the issue onto the front pages with a ludicrous statement of 100% fibre penetration by 2025, though momentum was gathering prior to this. Last year, at Broadband World Forum in Berlin, one panel session discussed the improved appetite from investment funds and bodies to fuel the objective. The consumer demand has been proven, therefore the money men are starting to get interested.

What is worth noting is that Openreach is not the only firm who is on the charge with fibre expansion. Virgin Media’s Project Lightening is progressing successfully, while CityFibre is leading the charge for the ‘alt-nets’ to broaden the footprint in areas which might be deemed less commercially attractive.

With ambitious Government targets pushing the fibre rollout, it is encouraging to see promises entering into reality.

Utilities to focus on disrupting pedestrians not vehicles

The UK Department of Transport has unveiled a new consultation which proposes new utilities infrastructure would have to be installed under pavements as opposed to roads.

The aim is to reduce disruptions to traffic across the country. Said disruptions to people’s journeys and congestion are estimated to cost the economy around £4 billion, though the new proposition is supposedly one which can address this. This new approach will be applicable to telcos for fibre, but also electricity, gas and water companies.

The consultation document states:

“Unless the Permit Authority consents to the placing of apparatus under the carriageway including to assist with the roll-out of national infrastructure projects or to enable urban greening and street trees, it is a condition of this permit that activities placing new apparatus underground should, where possible and practical, be placed under the footway, footpath or verge.”

The concept of the consultation is simple. When laying new infrastructure utilities and telcos will have to dig up pavements not the road anymore. It seems it is a lot more important to get people to work than to keep the pavements safe, though this might be an interesting approach to reduce the disruptions caused by 2.5 million road works each year.

As part of a wider scheme which will be known as ‘Digital Street Manager’, the Department of Transport also intends to force the utilities to be much more organized when deploying or upgrading infrastructure. It seems residents and local authorities are sick of roads being repeatedly being dug up, when realistically multiple projects could be completed back-to-back, minimising disruptions.

While this is not the sort of consultation which will have people rioting in the streets, there are pros and cons to both sides of the argument.

The idea of digging up pavements as opposed to roads has been the norm in some countries around the world for some time, such as Germany, and it does reduce disruptions. This is not to say it can be applied every time, but however it is sensible. Most roads have pavements on both sides of the road, therefore pedestrians can simply cross the road should there be work being done.

That said, there is criticism. Some might suggest the work would still overflow onto the road as there are few pavements which are wide enough to house a digger and several workmen. You also have to wonder what those with front doors which open directly onto the pavement would do during the works. Presumably in some awkward situations they would have to just give up on going in or out of their home until the work has been completed.

Another point to consider is the ‘real estate’ which is actually available. Gas or water pipes are not exactly small, and most pavements are not exactly wide. When you have to find space for the pipes, electricity wires and fibre cabling, you might run out of room rather quickly. In some cases, it might simply be impossible.

It is an interesting idea, and while something does need to be done to ensure civil engineering projects are completed in the most efficient manner, the industry has been calling for less red-tape not additional regulations…

Huawei pins its UK hopes on Boris Johnson’s fibre plans

The UK’s new Prime Minister has inherited the difficult Huawei decision and the Chinese vendor has wasted no time in applying some gentle pressure.

While campaigning for the top job, Boris Johnson pledged to deliver full-fibre broadband to every single person in the UK by 2025. Many, including this publication, scoffed at the blind optimism of it all, but Huawei seems to see it as an opportunity to demonstrate how important it remains to the UK economy.

Speaking during Huawei’s first half financial announcement, Huawei’s President of Global Government Affairs, Victor Zhang, had plenty to say about the UK. “Boris Johnson has mentioned many times the importance of delivering ultrafast fibre broadband to rural areas,” he said. “We strongly support this vision and are committed to helping the UK deliver it. Rural fibre broadband isn’t just important for connectivity to the home, it will also help power 5G in remote communities.

“The fibre availability in the UK has had a big gap compared to elsewhere. I fully support the UK government and the new Prime Minister to deploy full fibre in the UK. It’s critical for productivity and economic development and in helping remote communities flourish. We can’t deploy 5G in these areas without fibre.”

Ah yes, 5G. That’s the biggie for Huawei, with the US continuing to pressure the UK into an outright ban of the company from participating in any part of its 5G network. With Johnson and US President Trump apparently on good terms Huawei must be privately fearing the worst, but it has to hope Johnson remains open to all sides of the matter.

He at least doesn’t seem to feel rushed into making a final call one way or the other, as the decision to postpone it once more last week would seem to imply. Huawei is choosing to derive optimism from this. “We welcome the support of the UK government with the supply chain review,” said Zhang. “These new regulations are an important step to ensuring robust security and the best technology for all. Personally, I believe the UK will continue to make the right decisions in terms of using the best technology.”

As important as the Huawei decision is, Johnson can’t really afford to think about anything other than Brexit for the next three months as, if he screws that up, there’s a good chance he won’t even be in power anymore. If we finally do properly leave the EU that would probably be bad for Huawei as it would presumably make the US more influential in setting our foreign policy, but that remains a big if.

CityFibre jumps on the BoJo bus

With Boris Johnson (BoJo) settling into his new home in No.10 Downing Street, CityFibre is one of the first telcos to champion the office of the blonde bombshell.

“As the original champions of full fibre in the UK, we are delighted to see the new Government recognise the vital importance of rolling out this transformational infrastructure, and we stand ready to work with Government to help achieve this vision,” a CityFibre spokesperson stated.

The UK is now entering into the realms of the unknown, though there is one thing which we can be certain of over the next few months; politics is going to have a very different taste with BoJo at the helm. We couldn’t imagine a character more perfectly opposite to former-Prime Minister Theresa May, at least not in the Conservative party anyway.

“Full fibre connectivity is key to introduce a new generation of services, catalyse innovation, promote creativity and drive the economic and social development of the UK,” the statement continues.

What will be interesting to understand is whether the 100% penetration of full-fibre broadband services by 2025, a target hyped by BoJo over the last few weeks, is a genuine ambition or hot air. History has told us that BoJo has a tendency to get a bit over-excited when it comes to facts and figures, and this one might be a little ambitious.

The only certainty is change. BoJo will likely be more aggressive when it comes to Brexit and probably more pandering when it comes to the relationship with the US. BoJo is somewhat of a pet favourite of US President Donald Trump, fighting with former-UKIP leader Nigel Farage for most loving strokes from the Commander in Chief.

Some might say this is a good position for the UK, with Brexit forcing the Government to look further afield for lucrative trade deals, though the Huawei saga will continue. The Supply Chain Review announcement left no-one with clarity over the UKs position, though with BoJo’s White House relationship it might spell trouble. The can has been kicked down the street and it has landed firmly in BoJo’s office.

After a 24-hour period which some media sites have been describing as a ‘Cabinet Massacre’, the industry will also have to get to grips with a new Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport. MP for Loughborough Nicky Morgan has assumed control of the department, and her CV can tell you why…

After working as a corporate lawyer at Travers Smith specialising in mergers and acquisitions, Morgan moved in-house to corporate law and was then elected as an MP in 2010. Since that point, Morgan has as the Economic Secretary to the Treasury, Financial Secretary to the Treasury, Minister for Women and Equalities, Secretary of State for Education and Chair of the Treasury Select Committee.

Looking through the ‘They work for you’ website, Morgan has not contributed to any discussions which concern technology, media or telecommunications in recent months. An interesting choice for DCMS and an interesting couple of months in store as Morgan gets herself up-to-speed.