Apple credit card is up-and-running

As promised by CEO Tim Cook during the last earnings call, the Apple Card is set to debut this month, with the team already taking applications from consumers.

To start with, randomly selected Apple customers who signed up months ago have gotten access, though the team is now building a list of iLifers who would like to receive the card upon full-launch. To start with, the credit card will only be available to US citizens, though we can’t imagine it will be too long before the ambitious Applers spread their wings internationally.

For Apple, this is another step towards decreasing reliance on the iPhone, a product which has dominated the profitability column for quite some time. In the years of gluttony, few would have complained about this reliance, but nowadays, with smartphone shipments slowing down globally, the desire for diversification has intensified.

Working alongside Goldman Sachs, Apple has said customers can register their interest in the card in less than a minute, which perhaps seems irresponsible considering the seriousness of applying for credit. This little dose of reality will create little concern for either partner, both of whom will be relying on consumer over-indulgence to fuel profits.

That said, there are some interesting gimmicks being included with the service.

When using the card, all purchases will appear in the customers app, as is norm for the industry, but graphics will offer greater insight into spending habits. As you can see below, the distribution of colour on the card image and the graphs below detail how you are spending your money. Pink is for entertainment, yellow for shopping and orange for food, it is an interesting way to display purchasing patterns.

Apple Card

Other features include cash back and lower interest rates, though it is missing some of the perks which are so heavily hyped with traditional credit card providers.

What will be interesting to see over the next couple of months is the receptiveness of customers to a smartphone manufacturer entering into the financial world. Apple has one of the most admired brands worldwide and a cult-like following of customers, but whether this translates into something as important as financial services remains to be seen.

BoJo’s 2025 fibre promise has no basis in reality

Being ambitious is all well and good, but most would hope the ambitious are living in the world of reality. Unfortunately, with Boris Johnson’s Fibre-to-the-Home objectives, he’s operating in dreamland.

Perhaps this is a situation which we should have come to expect. Theresa May has one foot out the door and the jostling to inherit 10 Downing Street is starting to ramp up. This weekend saw the first televised debate, with one obvious omission, and soon enough the big promises to woo the Conservative Party membership are going to be dominating the headlines.

Politicians tend to exaggerate when it comes to promises on the campaign trail, and Tory leadership hopeful Boris Johnson (BoJo) certainly has history; who could forget the £350 million we were going to save the NHS every day by leaving the European Union.

The latest promise from BoJo is his government would deliver full-fibre broadband to every single person in the UK by 2025. This target would wipe off eight years from the current strategy set up by the Government in the Future Telecoms Infrastructure Review (FTIR).

Just to emphasise this point. The current objective is seen as ambitious and would see the full-fibre rollout complete in just over 13.5 years, but BoJo is suggesting it can be done in less than half that time.

The feedback from our conversations with industry is simple; what planet does BoJo think he is on?

However, what is worth bearing in mind is that the ambitious always have been criticised. When someone comes out with a bold idea, sceptics will beat them back. It is easy to criticise BoJo with this claim, because it is almost impossible to imagine how it is going to be done, but on the other hand, it is almost impossible to criticise the ambitious because there is no substance, no detail and no plan. It’s not something which should be taken that seriously because there are no details in place to actually make it happen.

One of the questions you have to ask is when did BoJo become a telco guru? We’re struggling to think of any examples of when he has contributed in any meaningful manner to the connectivity debate. If BoJo has had these telco smarts all along, able to solve one of the biggest challenges the industry has faced in decades, he certainly was playing the long-game in keeping them to himself.

Openreach has of course been perfectly politically correct when asked for comment. “It’s hugely ambitious, but so are we,” said an Openreach spokesperson. “We agree that full fibre can be the platform for the UK’s future prosperity and no company is investing more, building faster or aiming higher than Openreach. We aim to reach four million homes and businesses by March 2021 and up to 15 million by mid 2020s if the conditions are right.

“We’re already in decent shape when it comes to ‘superfast’ broadband, which is more widely available here than in almost any other comparable nation on earth – and has led the UK to have the leading digital economy in the G20.

“But building full fibre technology to the whole of the UK isn’t quick or easy. It requires £30 billion and a physical build to more than 30m front doors, from suburban terraces to remote crofts. We’re determined to lead the way and there’s a lot that Government could be doing now to help us go further and faster.”

But let’s assume BoJo is the master of telco, as we don’t have to be as nice as those in the industry; we have a couple of questions. Firstly, where is the money coming from? Secondly, where are the scissors to cut through the red-tape maze? Thirdly, where are the new employees going to emerge from? And finally, how did he actually come to this figure without actually speaking to anyone in the industry?

Starting with the money, the big query from our contacts was where is the cash coming from? The telcos are working as fast as they are commercially capable of, but BoJo believes they can go faster should the right incentives be put in place. The industry suggests full-fibre infrastructure would cost in the region of £30 billion, and it won’t be stumping all of that cash up. That’s not how investment strategies work.

A sensible and scalable capital investment strategy is focused on gradual rollouts, with an emphasis on ROI as the deployment progresses. You need to reclaim the investment as you are continuing to spend otherwise you are making yourself vulnerable to seesaw of market trends through over-exposure.

If BoJo is suggesting massive government funding projects, fair enough, but considering the NHS is underfunded, schools are overcrowded and there aren’t enough coppers on the beat, we’re not too sure where he is going to find this cash to fix what is fundamentally a first-world problem.

Secondly, you also have to wonder whether BoJo has put any thought into the bureaucratic challenges which the industry is facing. This is what our industry insiders were so confused about; has there been any thought to the administrative and bureaucratic challenges which are some of the biggest hurdles to deployment?

The 2033 target is one which has been put in place with these challenges in mind. The Government is considering proposals which would address way leaves, access to new builds or business rates for fibre, but these are still question marks. Perhaps BoJo is going to come in and carve away all the red-tape which is holding deployments back, creating a light-touch regulatory environment.

2033 will only be achieved should the right regulatory conditions be cultivated. If BoJo is going to correct this challenge, he’ll have to take a very large hatchet to the rulebook. This point has also been echoed by the Internet Services Providers’ Association:

“Boris Johnson’s ambitious commitment to achieve full fibre coverage by 2025 is welcome, but needs to be matched with ambitious regulatory change, including reform of the Fibre Tax,” said Andrew Glover, ISPA Chair. “Broadband is a largely privately financed infrastructure and together with outdated planning laws, fibre business rates are holding our members back from accelerating their roll-out plans.”

Another consideration is on the people side of things. Openreach recruited 3,000 engineers last year and is planning to recruit another 3,000 this year. Virgin Media is continuing to recruit to fuel Project Lightning, but you have to wonder how many bodies these companies will need to meet the 2025 target.

Even if there was an aggressive recruitment drive, people with the right skills are not just lazing about on street corners. One person pointed out that it isn’t a case of simply putting a hard hat on Joe Bloggs and asking them to dig a hole; there is a lot of training which goes into the recruitment progress. Another wondered whether there would be enough potential recruits if BoJo achieves another one of his headline promises; Brexit. How much of a talent drain will there actually be?

The speed at which full-fibre networks are being deployed is already pretty quick, the industry is connecting 3-4 million homes a year to meet current objectives. To hit Bojo’s ambitions, this number would have to be north of 5 million a year. Virgin Media’s Project Lightning is adding 400,000-500,000 premises a year, while Openreach is adding more than a million. Add in the alt-nets and progress is promising. Going faster is going to be tricky in today’s world.

We’re not too sure who BoJo has been talking to when he came to the 2025 target, but one thing is pretty clear; he’s not on the same page logistically, bureaucratically or financially as the telcos.

Apple announces original content, a credit card and a news subscription service

Apple’s big services event didn’t disappoint, with a bunch of potentially disruptive launches together with new levels of hyperbole and clapping.

The headline service was Apple TV+, which marks Apple’s first major foray into original content. We were treated to an interminable procession of Hollywood types, starting with Stephen Spielberg and culminating with Oprah Winfrey, all taking it in turns to come onto the stage and hype their projects. Judging by the line-up Apple has realised it needs to spend big if it wants to take on the likes of Netflix.

As ever the audience of media and analysts at the live event were about as objective and sceptical as hungry puppies. Every pause in the polished narrative was filled with rapturous applause and ecstatic whoops. So choreographed was it that we wouldn’t be surprised if there were prompts and the tendency to cheer at the mere mention of a new product without waiting to even find out anything about it was especially jarring.

As was Apple CEO Tim Cook’s toe-curling hyperbole. “TV at its best enriches our lives and we can share it with the people we love,” he pronounced at the start of the TV announcement. The original content bit was preceded with the revelation that “great stories can change the world.” This sort of stuff was pretty hard to stomach when Steve Jobs was delivering it, but his messianic zeal just about pulled it off. Cook offers little such salve.

The other potentially disruptive announcement was a new Apple credit card called Apple Card. This had been rumoured for a while and, as expected, it has been create in partnership with Goldman Sachs and MasterCard. In reference to Apple Pay Cook felt compelled to say “Its growth has been literally off the charts,” for some reason. The most intriguing part of the card is the offer of 2% cash back on every purchase, which makes you wonder how much merchants are going to get stung for its use. There’s also a physical card made out of titanium that only offers 1% for some reason.

Apart from that we got a couple of new subscription services. The more significant one is for news and magazines that will set you back a tenner a month and will be positioned as a potential solution to the cash crisis faced by the media, but let’s see. “We believe in the power of journalism,” said Cook. There was also a teaser for a games subscription service that will offer exclusive titles and make it easier to play across platforms.

“We’re honoured that the absolute best line-up of storytellers in the world — both in front of and behind the camera — are coming to Apple TV+,” said Eddy Cue, Apple’s SVP of Internet Software and Services. “We’re thrilled to give viewers a sneak peek of Apple TV+ and cannot wait for them to tune in starting this fall. Apple TV+ will be home to some of the highest quality original storytelling that TV and movie lovers have seen yet.”

“Apple Card builds on the tremendous success of Apple Pay and delivers new experiences only possible with the power of iPhone,” said Jennifer Bailey, VP of Apple Pay. “Apple Card is designed to help customers lead a healthier financial life, which starts with a better understanding of their spending so they can make smarter choices with their money, transparency to help them understand how much it will cost if they want to pay over time and ways to help them pay down their balance.”

“We’re committed to supporting quality journalism, and with Apple News+, we want to celebrate the great work being done by magazines and news outlets,” said Lauren Kern, Editor in Chief of Apple News. “We think the breadth and quality of publications within Apple News+ will encourage more people to discover stories and titles they may never have come across before.”

Note Apple News has an Editor in Chief. Cook made it clear that Apple would only serve up the right kind of news for its subscribers and he has been clear about his willingness to impose a moral filter on everything Apple does. You have to wonder how empowered to interfere with the content published on Apple News this Editor in Chief will be.

“This represents a landmark moment for Apple with a major event solely focussed on services,” said Analyst Paolo Pescatore, who was at the event. “It underlines a growing and strong focus on services as a future source of revenue growth. In essence Apple is seeking to become a Netflix of everything in services; music, news and magazines, video and games.

“Netflix has done a great job to date. However, more content and media owners will pull programming off its offering. This represents a significant opportunity for the likes of Apple who has scale and greater resources. There are too many players chasing too few dollars. The market will evolve towards a handful of players in the future.”

Apple idiosyncrasies aside this felt like a fairly solid  launch event. The company has an amazing track record of disrupting industries and seems likely to do so again with original TV content and consumer finance. The scene is set for a content arms race with only the biggest spenders likely to survive and Apple has a deepest pockets of all. Game on, here are some vids.

 

SingTel saw Q4 profit drop by 14%

SingTel reported almost flat revenues and 14% decline in net profit in the quarter ending 31 December 2018, blaming negative influence from its investments in Australia and India.

In its quarterly results announcement, SingTel reported a 1% year-on-year growth in revenues to S$ 4.626 billion (1 Singapore $ = 0.74 US$), or 4% in constant currency, but 11% decline in EBITDA, and 14% decline in net profit. The first nine months of FY2019 saw revenues almost unchanged (up by 0.2%) of the same period the previous year, EBITDA down by 8%, and net profit down by 51%. The total free cash flow is still solid at S$2.5 billion although it went down by 10% from a year ago.

“We have stayed the course despite heightened competition and challenging market and economic conditions. We’ve continued to add postpaid mobile customers across our core business in both Singapore and Australia while making positive strides in the ICT and digital space,” said Chua Sock Koong, Singtel Group CEO. “We remain focused on investing in networks and building our digital capabilities – areas that are important to our customers and our future success. We will also step up on managing costs, growing revenues and driving efficiencies through increased digitalisation efforts.”

The key factor that impacted the results was the return on its investment in regional associates. The total profit before tax (PBT) in its regional associate portfolio went down by 35% to S$342 million. The worst hit was Airtel, which suffered a S$167 million decline in PBT and registered a pre-tax loss of S$129 million. When broken down to different markets, Airtel fared better in Africa but came under “continued pricing pressures” (from Jio)

In Australia, SingTel’s subsidiary Optus has delivered a healthy growth of 16% in total revenues  to A$1.64 billion (1 Australian $ = 0.71 US$). The mobile operator also switched on Australis’s first commercial 5G network in January. The slower than expected migration to NBN by broadband users, however, has brought in a 9% decline in mass market fixed revenue.

Despite lowering its outlook for the full financial year (ending 31 March) from stable EBITDA to single digital decline, SingTel was still confident in its long-term prospective. “Our long-term view on our regional associates remains positive as they continue to ride the growth in data and execute well against the challenges and competition,” added Chua, the CEO. “We expect the regional markets to revert to more sustainable market structures and deliver long-term profitable growth. Meanwhile, we are working closely with them to build a regional ecosystem of digital services that leverages the Group’s strengths and unlocks the value of our joint mobile customer base of over 675 million.”

 SingTel 3QFY2019 results

Orange plans banking profitability by 2023

With many commentators expressing doubt over Orange’s banking venture, it might come as somewhat of a surprise the team are planning to be profitable by 2023.

After launching the financial business last year, the company is collecting customers increasingly quickly and is currently in the planning stages of its pan-European assault. Spain is next on the list, but it is the profitability and larger revenue growth contributions to the Orange Group business which are capturing attention.

“The entry of Orange into the non-telco services, should be viewed as defensive and pre-emptive actions,” Ramon Fernandez, Executive Director of Finance, Performance and Europe at Orange told Telecoms.com. “It’s a key lever to stimulate growth beyond what the mature telco business can offer.”

This is seemingly how Orange is viewing the banking services. With profitability and growth in the traditional telco segments constantly eroding, any operator which wants to seek bumper returns will have to search elsewhere. In the Orange business, this has taken the form of cyber security solutions, entertainment, the enterprise cloud segment and finally, banking.

Mobile finance might seem like a significant step away from the traditional telco business, though there are common factors which all each to function and grow. This isn’t just a case of grabbing entirely new revenues, the convergence strategy is winning through again.

As it stands, the banking product in France currently has 200,000 customers, though ambitions are to have two million by 2026. Of those customers, 60% are opening accounts in the stores across France. This is a significant opportunity for Orange, as while there are certainly cross-selling benefits from telco to finance and vice-versa, the finance business does not exist without the retail footprint across the country. Fernandez described this as the ‘phygital’ world, which gives Orange an advantage over other digital challenger banks, of which there are quite a few in France.

That said, the retail footprint isn’t the only benefit. Brand awareness is now up to 45% thanks to the strong position of the Orange business in France, though the data which the banking team can lean on is critical. With services being launched in the loans and credit world, telco customer billing data can be used to understand the risk profile of customers. Identifying the right customers, with an acceptable level of risk, is key for the business and this is where the telco business can really drive benefits as well.

The important factor from a marketing perspective, which Fernandez and Paul de Leusse, the bank’s CEO, have been keen to emphasise is this is not being sold as a traditional bank; they aren’t selling a traditional banking relationship, they are selling the way to use a banking application on the phone. Orange doesn’t want to innovate on products, this is viewed as dangerous, but instead focus on user experience. AI is being pushed heavily, with digital interactions being preferred. This will mean not all customers relevant, but those who are demonstrate a desire for AI-interactions. de Leusse claims 45% of current customers prefer this route, and with a median age of 42, it isn’t just the digital natives who are adopting.

For the moment, the team are still in aggressive customer acquisition mode, this will continue through year two before a few years of stabilizing OPEX. Scalability is obviously critical here, and is set to start making an impact as the team has already negotiated a reduction in manufacturing costs for cards this month. This will make a notable impact on the launch of the Spanish finance business which will launch early next year with Romania to follow quickly afterwards.

This is where profitability will come from. By 2023, the team plan to break even, projecting revenues of €500 million with four million customers spread through seven countries. Only five of these countries will have a fully-functioning bank, though Orange Money services will plug the gaps elsewhere. While many telcos would shirk at the prospect of going into finance, Orange is approaching it as a convergence opportunity. The simplest way to look at this is regimented loyalty.

In years gone, telcos used to use the complicated process of switching providers as a means to enforce loyalty. With regulators now tackling this frustrating part of customer engagement, new ideas are needed. Convergence is one of those, as while there are pricing benefits to the customer, tying as many services as possible into one provider makes leaving a nightmare. If you were to take all of Orange’s services now, upon leaving you would have to search for providers for mobile, broadband, banking, entertainment and security. Having all of your bills in one place is nice when you’re happy, but leaving is a disaster; it is essentially enforced loyalty.

This might sound negative, and it is slightly nefarious, but this should not detract from an interesting and ambitious move from Orange. Telcos are searching for new revenues to compensate from the OTT assault, and this is proving to be a successful venture.

Legere casts wild eyes over to the world of banking

SEC-filings have emerged suggesting T-Mobile US is looking into creating a banking product for its customers which could be launched in a matter of weeks.

The documents, which have been filed by Customers Bancorp, describe a partnership which has been in place since September 2016, with the two parties coming together to build the relevant technology and products since. Details are relatively thin on the ground as it stands, though in naming T-Mobile in the documents it is a pretty sure sign of diversification from the telco.

With more customers showing readiness to adopt mobile banking solutions the idea does make sense. T-Mobile US is constantly looking for new opportunities to laud over the ‘duopoly’, as CEO John Legere describes AT&T and Verizon, so it should come as no surprise the team are looking for new ways to engage customers.

Although T-Mobile US would not be considered a challenger brand in the same way as Iliad in Italy or Jio in India, the shake-up of the business under Legere’s leadership has created a similar disruption. T-Mobile US has continuously boasted of collecting new customers with ease quarter after quarter, but such momentum can only last so long; new ideas are needed.

In India, Jio has diversified into content and also hinted at an assault on the broadband market, though T-Mobile US has resisted such pleasures to date. The introduction of financial services is simply another tool in the shed for T-Mobile US to maintain its current course. The last few Uncarrier moves have not been the earth shakers of yesteryear, though this would certainly capture the attention of the masses.

With a huge customer base, 73 million subscribers, and a sound relationship with said customers, churn was 0.95% during the last quarter, the foundations are steady. However, the big question is whether the T-Mobile US brand, led by the eccentric and wild Legere, can present itself as a business in which consumers would be confident in dealing with for their finances.

Banks do not generally present themselves as fun or charismatic brands mainly because dealing with an individual’s money is a serious matter. People will want their cash handled by a man who looks like a stereotypical accountant, not a 40 year-old frat-boy. This is perhaps one of the issues T-Mobile US will have to assess, as Legere does not give the impression of the most trustworthy banker.

Engaging via a different credit pathway

Telecoms.com periodically invites third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this piece Jacquie Amacher, VP of Marketing at Juvo, argues that the critical relationship for a prepaid subscriber is with the company it buys its balance top-ups from.

Extending airtime credit to pre-paid customers has always been seen as something of an emergency service. But the latest thinking sees it instead as a means to a very different end.

If we take a typical pre-paid customer in an emerging market, the moment of truth for that customer, so to speak, is when they need to top-up. As a credit balance drops to near-zero, the customer heads to their usual agent or outlet to buy more airtime. As far as the operator is concerned, this is the time when, far too often, the moment of truth quickly becomes the moment of churn – because the power in the top-up process lies with the agent on the ground and not with the operator’s marketing and sales team.

In markets where more than 85 per cent of subscribers are pre-paid customers who need to top-up, that loss of power is a problem. In fact it leads to churn rates in emerging markets that touch 35 per cent per year as the agents push the consumer towards the network which is offering – that week – the best commission levels and incentives. These agent reward schemes often fluctuate from month to month as operators try to get an edge in the marketplace; but arguably they only serve to fuel churn.

To try to wrestle back control, and effectively put off the moment of churn, some operators use simple emergency lending to keep a customer connected for a limited period of time if their balance falls to zero. These loans are designed to get the customer through that period between the airtime credit running out and the funds becoming available to visit the agent. The thinking behind the emergency loan is simple – customers are less likely to swap SIMs and more likely to stay with a network that helped them in their time of need – no airtime credit and no money.

There’s another side to this though; the customer now has a debt to clear with the network, coupled with an interest charge to clear or fee to pay which immediately eats into their credit at top-up. What’s more, to limit the risk of the unsecured micro-loan and guard against a customer simply starting a new anonymous pre-pay agreement on a different network, the operators also use a variety of fairly restrictive emergency lending criteria. Typically these take into account the frequency and value of the top up as well as the tenure of the customer with the network. A long-term customer, with a good, frequent top-up history is a much safer bet than one who has just joined the network and carries no history. In fact many operators privately admit that as many as 90 per cent of their pre-paid base would not be considered eligible for emergency lending.

There are other flaws in the ways many emergency loans are currently offered. For example, often the offers are triggered by the time of the month, rather than the actual real-time credit balance. This makes some offers irrelevant and many others – given that the size of the credit extension is habitually set a very low level – almost worthless if the operator only targets those subscribers deemed to be a good risk.

Simply put, emergency micro-loans are an outdated approach that is neither dynamic, intelligent or personal; nor do the loans have a clearly defined strategic purpose – such as increasing customer engagement and opening a pathway to new services. They are simply a tool to put off the moment of truth rather than actually helping the operator to regain control. They are not even that efficient. The overly conservative nature of the program limits the addressable market, and therefore doesn’t make best use of a significant amount of actionable data sitting within the operator’s network.

Rather than generate revenue, we think the way micro-loans are typically managed today actually leaves significant operator revenue uncollected on the table. But with a different, properly integrated approach they can become a key part of a targeted operator solution that aims to combat churn, drive revenues, increase customer engagement, and create a pathway to financial inclusion for a huge number of undocumented pre-paid consumers.

Doing this effectively involves some key, game-changing principles:

  • Initiate direct contact via an operator branded app
  • Base the contact on real-time usage and behaviour data
  • Provide help from the first moment
  • Don’t always wait for the moment of truth – act early
  • Don’t charge interest on airtime loans

The idea is to trigger engagement right from the moment the SIM is activated. What’s more, right from that first moment, operators can apply tried and trusted programs from the retail world such as loyalty and reward programmes which will not be effective in building loyalty, they will also increase engagement and generate more customer data points. Simply by integrating the top-up process and credit extensions into a real-time app with a built-in loyalty and rewards program, operators are able to develop a direct relationship and achive a position of mutual trust with a customer who before was simply an anonymous number.

That early and often engagement is vital. Regardless of the subject of an app, market-wide statistics show that 90 per cent of customers who download an app and engage with it on a weekly basis during the first month are retained as long term users. Without that level of engagement, apps lose customers quite quickly. Indeed, financial services apps that don’t hit that weekly target retain less than five per cent of their users three months after their initial install.

We think that smart operators will therefore use that first month after SIM activation to quickly build a relationship with a new customer based on rewards and activities that can build progressive airtime credit extensions. All of this will drive engagement, and take the power in the relationship away from the agent, and place it firmly in the operator’s app. Another point to bear in mind: in highly competitive markets, many with 130%+ penetration rates, some operators lose a third or more of their newly activated SIMs even before the first top-up. This style of early engagement can stop that drain in its tracks.

Engagement can be further increased by developing membership style levels of user. It’s possible to encourage pre-paid customers to quickly transition through reward levels such as bronze, silver and gold and ensure that each move up the ladder adds more information to the operator’s dataset about that customer. The data collected and analysed from this engagement and interaction is then be used to fuel further offers, larger credit extensions and eventually other financial inclusion services.

This is what we term data science at work – driving a customer engagement, retention and loyalty program that delivers tangible results. In the Caribbean, Cable & Wireless was able to reduce churn by 50 per cent and increase ARPU by ten per cent in the first 120 days after installation of the app. Today, credit extensions are available to almost 95 per cent of the operator’s base and more than 25 per cent of its customers use the App every day. Those are powerful arguments for improving engagement with a pre-pay customer base.

The strategic use of credit extensions can help to effectively turn pre-paid customers into regular subscribers as well as help to build a range of personalised financial services that lock-in customers. But it doesn’t work if the credit is treated like as emergency-only service, and it doesn’t work if the customers are left open to other influences at the moment of truth. The way to do things differently is for operators to engage early, engage often and engage directly.

 

Jacquie Amacher VP Marketing at JuvoAs VP of marketing, Jacquie leads Juvo’s brand strategy and global communications efforts. She brings over 20 years experience in brand transformation and strategic marketing for both high growth companies and emerging technologies in the mobile technology marketplace. Jacquie was at the forefront of high profile product and digital service launches from leading-sector companies including Motorola and Verizon, and has served on the executive leadership team of two global advertising agencies.