Disney revenues surge as world waits for streaming service

Revenues at ‘The House of Mouse’ have surged more than 34% for its final quarter of 2019, collecting more than £69.5 billion for the full year.

While investors will certainly be happy with the news, perhaps the best is yet to come. Next week, Disney’s own streaming service will enter int frame for the first time, while it has also been confirmed the service will launch in the UK on March 31. With analysts expecting more than 15 million subscribers in the 12 months, 2020 could be a very profitable year.

“Our solid results in the fourth quarter reflect the ongoing strength of our brands and businesses,” said Robert Iger, CEO of The Walt Disney Company. “We’ve spent the last few years completely transforming The Walt Disney Company to focus the resources and immense creativity across the entire company on delivering an extraordinary direct-to-consumer experience, and we’re excited for the launch of Disney+ on November 12.”

Fourth Quarter Full Year
Total Revenue $19.1 billion $69.5 billion
Costs $16.8 billion $57.7 billion
Net Income $1.05 billion $11.05 billion

Despite costs climbing 49% for the three months ending September 28, share price in overnight trading climbed more than 5%. With the launch of the $7 streaming service only days away, it is clear Disney is not shy about spending some cash to compete with the likes of Netflix and Amazon Prime on a global scale.

Iger as bet big on the streaming service to lead a new wave of revenues at Disney, and for the sceptics out there, there are now several interesting partnerships to back-up an already packed content library.

On the telco side, Disney has teamed up with Verizon to offer free subscriptions to customers who have an unlimited data tariff, while iLifers will receive a free subscription for 12 months when purchasing a new Apple TV.

Although the content world is certainly looking congested already, Disney looks like a service which could challenge the leading pair. Disney has the brand awareness, content library and aggressive investment strategy to make it work, though delivering effective customer experience will be critical. November 12 will be the day customers first get the opportunity to taste Disney+, so judgement will be reserved until this point.

O2 UK reports steady customer and revenue growth

The UK bit of Telefónica has reported healthy Q3 2019 numbers, with all the key metrics headed in the right direction.

Total revenues at O2 UK grew by 4.1% year-on-year, operating income was up 5.7% and the total customer base expanded by 5.6% to 34.1 million. O2 also reckons it has the lowest contract churn in the sector at 1%. Having said that the net adds were fairly flat, maintaining its mobile customer base at 26 million.

“Our Q3 performance continues the strong momentum we saw in the first half of the year, powered by a relentless focus on our customers through award-winning coverage and great offerings such as flexible Custom Plans and limitless data,” said Mark Evans, CEO of Telefónica UK

“We’re moving at pace with our 5G rollout, already live in six UK cities rising to twenty by the end of the year. 5G offers critical support to the UK’s digital economy, supporting jobs and growth. That’s why we welcome Ofcom’s recent statement updating the rules for the planned auction of more 5G airwaves. This will help operators to deliver greater value and better connectivity to the public.”

The other thing O2 seemed keep to flag up was its involvement in a scheme to test driverless vehicles in London via its recently launched 5G network. The project is being run by an organisation called the Smart Mobility Living Lab and it seems to have a fair bit of industry and public sector buy-in.

“At O2 we’re determined to help businesses of all sizes realise the potential of fifth-generation mobile technology,” said Brendan O’Reilly, O2’s CTO. “We know that the transport sector is going to be one of the key beneficiaries of 5G – and that the technology has the potential to reduce traffic congestion, as well as making journeys safer and more enjoyable.

“That’s why we’re excited to be working with the teams at the Smart Mobility Living Lab, who are driving forward our understanding how this next generation technology will fundamentally change the fabric of the cities in which we live and work as well as creating entirely new methods of travel.”

Facebook revenues surge as EU antitrust team revs its engine

Facebook has been on somewhat of a rollercoaster ride over the last 24 hours, revealing another quarter of impressive year-on-year growth, while rumours circulate it could be facing a competition probe.

In Menlo Park, California, CEO Mark Zuckerberg and CFO David Wehner boasted of another quarter which demonstrated the Facebook advertising machine is not slowing down, while on the other side of the Atlantic, Reuters has suggested the European Commission has taken the first steps in an antitrust investigation concerning the Marketplace feature.

What is worth noting is these are only the preliminary steps, and it will be some time before the European Commission decides whether to formally launch a full-investigation. After complaints alleged Facebook was using its market power to create an unfair competitive advantage, the European Commission has sent surveys to various players in the industry to better understand how the competitive landscape has developed.

For Facebook, this should be seen as a worrying sign. Details are thin on the ground for the moment, but it does appear rivals in the ‘classified ads’ segment are suggesting Facebook should not be allowed to diversify. The questionnaire sent to various players in the industry asks how many referrals came from the social media platform.

The question which seems to be asked here is whether it should be allowed to leverage such a massive user-base to steal business of rivals. The issue which Facebook might face is that it doesn’t collect revenue in the same way as those who are challenging the Marketplace.

Traditionally, the ‘seller’ is charged by the media outlet to engage the ‘buyers’ though Facebook has undermined this transaction. There is no charge to sellers to list products, with revenues being driven through sponsored listings and promotions embedded through the search results. Facebook is using its traditional ‘walled garden’ approach, creating an experience for users but charging companies for the pleasure of engagement.

Should the European Commission come to the consumer this is an abuse of market behaviour, rather than the evolution of commerce as we progress towards the digital economy, Facebook’s pursuit of new revenues by expanding the ‘walled garden’ model to new segments could be threatened.

Although revenues are looking healthy for the moment, a glass ceiling will be hit unless Facebook can offer new experiences. Advertising revenues have grown in-line with the userbase of the platforms, though there are only a finite number of users across the world. Facebook has to think of new ways to keep people on the platforms for longer, and for new reasons. Marketplace has been a success, though this is a threat to all diversification not just eCommerce.

From a revenue perspective, these new initiatives do seem to be aiding growth. Total revenues for the three-month period ending September 30 stood at $17.383 billion, a year-on-year increase of 28%, while net income was $6.091 billion, up 19%.

Daily actives users and monthly active users are also on the up, 9% and 8%, with the team now claiming 2.2 billion people now use Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp, or Messenger on a daily basis.

Facebook is a business which is certainly facing risks, though the potential to diversify is quite remarkable. New elements such as the Marketplace or the dating features being tested, are re-engaging users at a time when the social media giant seemed to have lost its way. However, this progress could be undermined should European antitrust authorities believe the Facebook disruption is only possible because of an unfair advantage.

Apple continues its transition from products to services

Quarterly revenues for gadget giant Apple were up year-on-year but down for the full year, as the company increasingly relies on services.

The headline of Apple’s latest quarterly announcement read: ‘Services Revenue Reaches All-Time High of $12.5 Billion’. This achievement masked the fact iPhone revenues continue to decline, which in turn dragged full year revenues into the red. On the whole, however, these were solid results for Apple and it seems to be managing its strategic transition well.

“We concluded a groundbreaking fiscal 2019 with our highest Q4 revenue ever, fueled by accelerating growth from Services, Wearables and iPad,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “With customers and reviewers raving about the new generation of iPhones, today’s debut of new, noise-cancelling AirPods Pro, the hotly-anticipated arrival of Apple TV+ just two days away, and our best lineup of products and services ever, we’re very optimistic about what the holiday quarter has in store.”

The services side of things was the focus of the tech press in its analysis. Apparently Apple pay transaction volume overtook that of PayPal in the most recent quarter. A significant initiative that illustrates the symbiosis of the services and hardware side is Apple’s decision to offer interest-free financing of new iPhones through its own credit card. This will also be a significant blow for the postpaid phone contract sector as subscribers will no longer be dependent on operators for handset financing.

The fact that iPhone shipments are declining is not disastrous, so long as Apple maintains the massive iOS installed -base. As the Apple Pay numbers show, Apple’s services are bound to do well so long as there are lots of iPhones in use. The financing initiative implies Apple is worried about that installed-base declining, however, and may not be the last time we see Apple further incentivising people to buy iPhones.

The columns in the table below are as follows: fiscal Q4 2019, Q4 2018, full fiscal year 2019, full year 2018.

Revenues are down, but BT looks ready to do battle

Total revenues and profits might have slipped slightly at BT, though it met expectations and it seems the business is lining-up its pieces for an assault on the UK market.

With the assets the telco has at its disposal, BT should dominate the market leaving the scraps for rivals to fight over, but this has not been the case. There have been some lavish spending sprees over the last few years, though the refreshed management is taking a more network-orientated approach as opposed to the ‘bells and whistles’ of the previous regime.

“BT delivered results in line with our expectations for the second quarter and first half of the year, and we remain on track to meet our outlook for the full year,” said CEO Philip Jansen.

“We’ve invested to strengthen our competitive position. We’ve accelerated our 5G and FTTP rollouts, introduced an enhanced range of product and service initiatives for both consumer and business segments, and announced price and technology commitments to deliver fair, predictable and competitive pricing for customers.”

Capital expenditure for the first six months of 2019 was £1.88 billion, up £225 million year-on-year, although this excludes the grants from the Broadband Delivery UK (BDUK) programme. Such increase should come as little surprise as the team has been enthusiastically shouting about 5G launches across the UK (now up to 20) as well as new homes which are being passed with fibre (23,000 per week) in pursuit of the Government’s lofty full-fibre goals.

In years gone, BT looked like a telco which was defined by its challenge to Sky in the content market, while few could recognise the synergies with EE. The BT of today looks very different, thrusting the connectivity assets to the centre of the business. With the convergence business model proving its worth in various European markets, see success at Orange for evidence, BT is taking inspiration.

With the fixed network in the UK, which is being aggressively fibred-up, 30 million mobile subscribers, five million wifi hotspots and a new TV proposition to be launched at some undefined point, the cross-selling opportunities are abundant should BT be able to nail the experience on the assets. This seems to be the focus of investments under Jansen, instead of going for the glamorous, the team is concentrating on delivering the core connectivity experience and then bundling on additional added-value options.

Across the business, the Average Revenue per Consumer (ARPC) for broadband remained relatively flat at £38.5 per month, while postpaid mobile decreased to £20.8, down 5.5% though as this has been attributed to new regulation and the SIM-only trends it is nothing too be too concerned about. Interestingly enough, the number of Revenue Generating Units (RGUs) per household has increased to 2.38. This is where the convergence strategy could make a very positive impact.

As a business model, convergence is more efficient and creates higher customer loyalty and NPS. Bundled at a suitable price-point, and it looks like a very attractive offer to steal subscriptions from rivals also. However, experience does have to be very high across the entire portfolio, hence the increased spend on the network over recent months.

This is where BT could be a very interesting business over the next couple of months. The ‘Halo’ converged products could attract interest, especially when the hotspots are bundled in also. Rivals might be able to compete with BT with a few bundles, but no-one can offer the same breadth across mobile, broadband, wifi and content. This is a massive advantage, and BT should be shouting and screaming.

We might have to wait a couple of months before the refreshed TV proposition is fully polished, but this is another reason why no-one should worry too much about the slipping revenues for H1. BT is still lining up the various pieces before an aggressive push with the full convergence offer. It has been suggested the TV proposition will not be ready until the new year.

With its assets, BT should be untouchable. It still has work to do on the fibre rollout, 5G deployment, finalising the TV offer, improving the wifi experience and aligning the BT and EE brands, but the ‘Halo’ converged offer could create some serious noise.

2019 First Half Financials
Total Revenue £11.467 billion (1%)
Profit before tax £1.333 billion n/m
Profit after tax £1.068 billion n/m
Basic earnings per share 10.8p 2%
Capital expenditure £1.882 billion 3%
Business units
Consumer £5.194 billion (1%)
Enterprise £3.055 billion (5%)
Global Services £2.196 billion (6%)
Openreach £2.356 billion n/m

n/m = not-meaningful

Verizon unveils mixed bag as media continues downward spiral

Verizon has released its third-quarter financials with the mobile business growing, broadband middling and media dropping.

Total revenues for the three-month period ending September 30 stood at $32.09 billion, a 0.9% increase year-on-year, though it has racked up $97.093 billion across 2019. As with previous quarters, there are positives to take away though the media business is still weighing heavy on the prospects of the group.

“Verizon continued its momentum in the third quarter by driving strong wireless volumes in both our Consumer and Business segments, while delivering solid financial results, highlighted by continued wireless service revenue growth, increased cash flow, and EPS growth,” said CEO Hans Vestberg.

As many would have imagined, little attention was given to the fragile media business. With each financial statement, the $5 billion bet on Yahoo’s media assets looks a little bit more like a waste of funds. Revenues in this business totalled $1.8 billion, down 2% percent year-on-year.

What was supposed to be the pursuit of alternative revenues in the ever-growing digital advertising segment is seemingly turning into nothing more than an Elephant’s Graveyard for assets in the digital economy. Aside from divesting interests in Flickr, Moviefone, MapQuest and Tumblr, Verizon is also reportedly on the search for a buyer for the Huffington Post. Perhaps executives have just had enough and are searching for a way to elegantly backtrack.

The failings of this business unit have been well-documented, so we do not want to invest too much time here, but Verizon was always going to fighting a losing battle. Winning a slice of the digital advertising profits requires out-of-the-box thinking, the ability to make money out of nothing. This is what Google, Amazon, Facebook and other innovative digital players can do.

But Verizon is not that type of business. It is a functional, engineering-focused, traditional beast. From a culture and risk-appetite perspective it was always going to struggle to compete with the lateral thinking Silicon Valley residents, and this is further evidence.

That said, when Verizon focuses on what it does best it can make money. The mobile business unit boasts of 193,000 retail postpaid net additions over the quarter and revenue growth of 2.6% year-on-year. Revenues for the broadband business are down year-on-year, but the number of Fios subscriptions are up 2.3%. It might not be as exciting to talk to investors about the world of connectivity compared to digital advertising, but it is what the company is very good at.

The team should of course attempt to secure new revenues to bolster the bottom line as the business of connectivity becomes increasingly commoditised but taking on the likes of Facebook and Google for digital advertising revenues always looked like too much of an ask.

Although this is a dampener for the Verizon business, there is more than a glimmer of hope around the corner; 5G.

There might be some questions regarding the coverage of its mmWave spectrum, but Verizon is making progress with 5G deployment. Alongside the financial results, the team also hit the go button for 5G in Dallas, Texas and Omaha, Nebraska. All of the launches are very limited from a coverage perspective, but momentum is gathering very quickly.

5G can form the catalyst for growth is the telcos force themselves through their own digital transformation. Let’s be clear, the telcos will not escape the utilitisation trends with 5G alone. The business needs to be transformed to offer new connectivity solutions to enterprise and consumer customers alike. Digital transformation is a more pressing concern for telcos than any other vertical.

But there is hope on the horizon. The lure of 5G contracts are proving to be tempting for consumers, which will help the bottom-line as data tariffs quickly surge towards unlimited as standard, and enterprise customers are enthusiastic about the connectivity euphoria. There are of course companies who want to steal the profits from the telcos, but the opportunity is still there.

Amazon profits fall and its share price follows

Internet giant Amazon announced strong sales growth but that didn’t translate into profit after it invested heavily in one-day shipping.

The consequent significant year-on-year rise in operating expenses, combined with shrinking margin at AWS, where most of Amazon’s profit comes from, resulted in quarterly operating income declining for the first time in a while. While investors had been warned about the increased overheads, they were apparently even greater than expected, because Amazon’s share price declined 6% on the news.

“We are ramping up to make our 25th holiday season the best ever for Prime customers — with millions of products available for free one-day delivery,” said Jeff Bezos, Amazon founder and CEO. “Customers love the transition of Prime from two days to one day — they’ve already ordered billions of items with free one-day delivery this year.

“It’s a big investment, and it’s the right long-term decision for customers. And although it’s counterintuitive, the fastest delivery speeds generate the least carbon emissions because these products ship from fulfillment centers very close to the customer — it simply becomes impractical to use air or long ground routes. Huge thanks to all the teams helping deliver for customers this holiday.”

As you can see from the table below, Amazon’s total overheads were 14 billion bucks higher in the most recent quarter than they were a year ago. North America is still where most of its sales are and thus where most of the overheads come from too. Profits disproportionality come from its AWS cloud services division, but even there margins are significantly reduced year-on-year.

Amazon has spent its entire history sacrificing profit on the altar of investment, and that seems to have paid off. So it’s hard to read too much into the share price fall other than a realisation among investors that Amazon is serious about this one-day delivery stuff. That will probably pay off in the long term too, and we expect Bezos isn’t very bothered about the short term reaction to his grand plan.

Investors learn Silicon Valley can be volatile as Twitter tanks

Twitter’s share price was slashed by 18% as the market opened this morning, with the social media giant failing to find enough consistency to impress investors.

There was a brief glimmer of hope that Twitter might have been a company people could rely on, but rainclouds have once again emerged to spoil the parade. It certainly isn’t corporate doomsday for Twitter, but the management team will have to start ensuring some consistency if they want to remain in their current employment for the long-term.

Looking at the results, total revenues for the three-month period stood at $824 million, a 9% year-on-year increase, but short of the $876 million analysts estimated. Unfortunately for any optimists, the next quarter isn’t looking much better.

Twitter is forecasting revenue to be between $940 million and $1.01 billion for the next three months, down on the $1.06 billion which was estimated by analysts. Operating income is expected to be in the $130 million and $170 million range.

Although the steep decline in share price has largely levelled off, it does not make for comfortable reading.

The question which remains is what went wrong at Twitter? Looking at the materials presented during the earnings call, the management team is pointing to two areas. Firstly, seasonality. Twitter is suggesting fewer users were using the platform during the summer months than it was expecting, partly due to a lack of major events which were taking place over July and August.

Secondly, bugs in the legacy Mobile Application Promotion (MAP) product impacted the ability to target ads and share data with measurement and ad partners. The team also discovered certain personalization and data settings were not operating as expected. Twitter estimates the product issues reduced year-over-year revenue growth by 3 or more points in Q3.

Although these figures, this quarter and the next three months, are not the best it does not demonstrate the business is fundamentally flawed. This should not be seen as a company which will fall off a cliff, next year could be much more promising.

Firstly, the team is retiring legacy products and introducing new systems constantly, as well as creating more opportunities for those advertisers who are craving video engagement. This is an area which Twitter lags behind other social media platforms, though it could certainly catch-up.

Secondly, when you look at what is going to happen over the next 12 months, it would suggest there will be increased engagement from users and therefore increased opportunity for advertisers. In Europe, you have the UEFA European Championships, in the US, the Presidential Election and in Japan, the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. All of these events present major opportunities for Twitter to engage users.

Looking at user engagement, Twitter has decided to alter the way it reports figures, creating its own metric which will be known as ‘monetizable daily active users’ (mDAU). This could be a useful way to measure engagement, and the explanation below is taken from the letter to shareholders:

“Average mDAU for a period represents the number of mDAU on each day of such period divided by the number of days for such period. Changes in mDAU are a measure of changes in the size of our daily logged in or otherwise authenticated active user base. To calculate the year-over-year change in mDAU, we subtract the average mDAU for the three months ended in the previous year from the average mDAU for the same three months ended in the current year and divide the result by the average mDAU for the three months ended in the previous year.”

In short, it is the number of users which can be served ads each day. Using this metric, Twitter estimates it was able to serve ads to 145 million people each day, on average, which is a 17% increase on the same period of 2018.

The only issue with this metric is that it isn’t the most transparent when it comes to app downloads or concrete figures on daily usage. That said, according to data from Sensor Tower, it is still one of the most popular social media applications worldwide.

These results are not representative of a company which is in trouble, but more demonstrates the volatility of the internet segment. It was a bad three months, but that does not necessatily make Twitter a bad company. There are few companies which emerge from the garages of Silicon Valley which are genuinely reliable, but Twitter is one which will probably get better.

The fundamentals of the business are pretty sound. Assuming the team continue to improve the user experience and fix the bugs in the advertising machine, it will make money. Events across 2019 will attract more people only the platform, especially with social media likely to feature very prominently through the 2020 Presidential Election campaign. Perhaps the market needs to take a reality check on how much money it expects Silicon Valley to hoover up.

Nokia shares tank after 5G weakness admission

Finnish kit vendor Nokia announced the suspension of its dividend and a significantly downgraded outlook as it struggles to make a profit from 5G.

Investors were clearly not expecting such a downbeat outlook and punished Nokia’s share price accordingly, sending it down 20% at time of writing to its lowest level for years. As you can see from the table below the sales performance wasn’t bad, with year-on-year growth of 1%.  The key downer, however, is declining margin and the consequent effect on Nokia’s cash position.

Nokia doesn’t see the margin situation improving, even in the mid-term, and consequently downgraded its margin outlook for both this year and next. Full year 2019 has had its margin downgraded by a couple of percentage points, while the 2020 margin outlook is now 5.5 percentage points lower than previously.

The most immediate crisis, however, seems to be Nokia’s cash position, which is now a mere €344 million. Nokia paid out around that amount in dividends last quarter, during which its cash pile was diminished by €160 million. If this trend continues then it will have run out of cash in a couple more quarters, so something clearly needed to be done. That took the form of an indefinite suspension of the dividend until the Nokia bank balance hits €2 billion, with a significant improvement expect at the end of the next quarter.

“Many of our businesses are performing well and we expect Q4 to be strong, with a robust operating margin and an increase in net cash of approximately EUR 1.2 billion,” said Nokia CEO Rajeev Suri. “At the same time, some of the risks that we flagged previously related to the initial phase of 5G are now materializing. In particular, our Q3 gross margin was impacted by product mix; a high cost level associated with our first generation 5G products; profitability challenges in China; pricing pressure in early 5G deals; and uncertainty related to the announced operator merger in North America.

“We expect that we will be able to progressively mitigate these issues over the course of next year. To do so, we will increase investment in 5G in order to accelerate product roadmaps and product cost reductions, and in the digitalization of internal processes to improve overall productivity. We will also continue to invest in our enterprise and software businesses, which are developing rapidly and performing well. Given these investments and the risks we see materializing, we are adjusting our targets for full-year 2019 and 2020; and we expect our recovery to drive improvement in our 2021 financial performance relative to 2020.

“I am confident that our strategy remains the right one. We continue to focus on leadership in high-performance end-to-end networks with Communication Service Providers; strong growth in enterprise; strengthening our software business; and diversification of licensing into IoT and consumer electronics.”

Suri seems to be saying it’s harder to make money out of 5G than had previously been thought. This is presumably due to a combination of the gear being more expensive to make than hoped and customers paying less for it. Huawei will be competing extra hard in those markets it’s allowed to participate in and Ericsson seems to be growing in strength, so Nokia is facing some pretty stiff competitive pressures.

With the suspension of the dividend Nokia will have several hundred thousand euros of extra working capital to invest in R&D and to cut prices of necessary. For some reason Nokia seems to be less competitive in 5G than expected, maybe it took its eye off the ball a bit during the Alcatel Lucent acquisition. Whatever the reason, it’s now playing catch-up and will ask its investors to remain patient for at least another year.

Microsoft revenues surge once again thanks to the cloud

This will officially be the last time we talk about Microsoft’s recovery, as it is unfair to undermine the continued progress and domination of the firm on the digital economy.

Everyone in the TMT industry knows the trouble Microsoft faced in bygone years, and everyone understands why the firm found itself in that position. But there is no need to discuss this aspect of the business anymore. CEO Satya Nadella has redefined the organization, leaving the troubles in the past. This business is a new beast and the latest financials prove it is one of the dominant forces in the digital economy.

“We are off to a strong start in fiscal 2020, delivering $33 billion in revenue this quarter,” Nadella said. “Our Commercial Cloud business continues to grow at scale as we work alongside the world’s leading companies to help them build their own digital capability.”

Fundamentally, Microsoft is a different business. In the 90s and 00s, Microsoft was defined by its dominance of the PC operating software world. Although this presence still exists today, the focus is on enterprise customers, however, the prospects of the business are perhaps more acutely focused on Azure, the cloud computing unit. The Microsoft of today and the troubled Microsoft of yesteryear are chalk and cheese.

Looking at the financials for the first quarter which were announced following the close of the market yesterday [23 October], they are once again pretty impressive. Total revenues increased 14% year-on-year to $33 billion, while operating income stood at $12.7 billion, up 27% from the same three-month period in 2018.

Revenues at Microsoft Azure increased 59% year-on-year, while the team has stated there has been a ‘material increase’ in the number of $10 million + contracts. The cloud is driving Microsoft forward, while the excitement around edge computing opens-up new prospects for the business.

This quarter also saw the team open two new datacentre regions, in Germany and Switzerland, taking the total up to 54 worldwide. Microsoft Azure is now available in 140 countries around the world, with the geographical footprint focused in Europe and North America.

Asia is one market where the team could grow further, and this might be a development worth keeping an eye on as more countries travel through the digital transformation journey. Nadella paid homage to a partnership with Indian telco Reliance Jio as a green-shoot of growth in the market.

Alongside the progress which is being made to expand the datacentre footprint of the business, the team is also pointing towards strategic partnerships with the likes of VMWare, Oracle and SAP for the added momentum in the cloud business.

“You’d actually see it in a couple of places [impact of partnerships], not just in Azure, which may in fact be the most logical extension,” said CFO Amy Hood during the earnings call.

“But, at the heart of this is making it easier, faster and more reliable for us to help customers move their estate to the cloud and to migrate that with confidence.”

This is perhaps one of the most exciting aspect of the cloud segment and will not just be limited to the success at Microsoft. There is still a huge amount of growth left to realise.

Many companies around the world will claim to be cultivating a cloud-first mentality, and many of these companies are migrating workloads across to the cloud. However, what has been achieved to date is only a fraction of the total. The cloud has matured, availability is increasing, and prices are decreasing. The likes of Microsoft, Amazon and Google might be hoovering up the profits, but there is still huge potential for growth.

Value Growth
Total revenue $33.1 billion 14%
Operating income $12.7 billion 27%
Net income $10.7 billion 21%
Productivity and Business Processes unit $11.1 billion 13%
Intelligent Cloud unit $10.8 billion 27%
More Personal Computing unit $11.1 billion 4%