Oracle reports flat growth as cloud segment booms

As a late-comer to the increasingly profitable cloud segment, Oracle has yet to make more than a minor dent, and this quarter appears to be another demonstration of mediocrity.

The company stopped reporting its cloud business revenues as a standalone during last year, so it is difficult to give a complete picture, though total revenues tell a part of the story. Total Revenues were $9.6 billion, down 1% year-on-year, though once constant currencies are applied the boost was 3%. Combined with a outlook which promises a range of 0% growth to negative 2% (1% to 3% growth in constant currency), its not necessarily the prettiest of pictures.

This is not to say Oracle is in a terrible position, the company is still profitable, and the growth prospects of the cloud segment encourage optimism, but it is not capturing the fortunes of its competitors.

Despite the heritage and continued influence of this business, perhaps we should not be surprised Oracle is not tearing up trees today. Back in 2008, CTO and founder Larry Ellison described the technology industry as the only segment “which is more fashion driven than women’s fashion”, suggesting cloud was nothing more than a passing fad.

Hindsight is always 20/20, but after this condemning statement about the embryonic cloud industry you can see why Oracle is reporting average numbers while others are hoovering up the cloud cash. Despite this late start, in 2016 Oracle felt it had caught up, with Ellison declaring “Amazon’s lead is over” during an earnings call.

While executives can make all the claims they like, reeling off various customer wins and pointing towards heritage in the technology industry, the numbers speak for themselves. Oracle is not profiting from the cloud bonanza in the same way competitors are.

Alongside the effectively flat revenue growth, Non-GAAP net income in Q3 was down 8% to $3.2 billion, while the merged cloud revenues and license support unit grew, it was only by roughly 1.1%. When you consider AWS, Google, IBM, Microsoft and Alibaba are all quoted numbers which are notably higher than this, it does paint a relatively gloomy picture.

Recent data from Synergy suggests revenues for 2018 passed the $250 billion across seven key cloud services and infrastructure market segments, operator and vendor revenues, representing a 32% increase year-on-year. Oracle will of course not be applicable for all of these segments however the overarching cloud trends are incredibly positive.

That said, perhaps the most damning piece of evidence is these numbers met analyst expectations. The team should be applauded for this fact however, it does suggest the analyst community no-longer consider Oracle a front-runner in the technology world. If the estimates are mediocre when the ingredients for success are so abundant, it doesn’t make for the most positive perception of one of yesteryears heavyweights.

Investment bank backs the BT waiting game

Don’t expect BT to give too much away over the next couple of months, but investment bank Jefferies thinks there is enough there to make the telco a good bet.

The arrival of new BT CEO Philip Jansen has sparked the prospect of the telcos revival, at least from a share price perspective, though Jefferies believes cards will be held very close to the chest for the moment. Don’t expect too much insight on future strategies over the near-future, but the foundations seem steady enough to put BT in a solid position.

The last few years have not made for comfortable reading for many BT investors. In November 2015, share price stood at £4.99. This was not a historical high, but it was a peak in recent memory. Since that point, share price has declined 56% after gains from EE remained elusive, the Openreach position was challenged and a disastrous entry into the content game. Under former-CEO Gavin Patterson, BT entered a slump.

That said, in January BT reported positive results, suggesting the restructuring process implemented over the last 12 months was setting the foundations for recovery. Jansen was entering a business which was in a reasonable position.

“BT welcomes its new CEO with foundations to build on, not a slate to wipe clean,” the Jefferies investor note states.

However, with Jansen’s first earnings call just weeks away, don’t expect too much insight on BT’s future strategy. With Ofcom’s Access Review still yet to see the light of day, it would be “illogical” for BT to make too much of a commitment in the near future.

Depending on the outcome of this review, there might be room for Openreach to consider premiums on FTTP, there might be demands to increase CAPEX, there might be a need to cut Dividend Per Share (DPS). There are too many maybe’s floating around the regulatory uncertainty created by government ambitions to fibre-up 15 million UK homes by 2025.

While there is a suggestion DPS growth might freeze or reverse, this could allow BT to redirect funds towards the CAPEX column at Openreach. This could assist the telco in creating a friendlier relationship with Ofcom, an outcome which would be beneficial for everyone involved.

Jefferies feels there are too many unknowns for the telco to make any concrete commitments moving forward, but in encouraging customers to Buy BT, there is seemingly a lot of confidence.

Ciena bags 20.5% growth perhaps thanks to Huawei dilemma

Optical networking company Ciena posted positive results for the first quarter of 2019, with total revenues of $778.5 million beating analyst expectations.

There have been whispers in corners of various conferences that a Huawei ban could benefit some, and it may well be having a positive impact for Ciena. While there are numerous other companies which would compete with Huawei in the optical equipment segment, with Ciena one of the few ‘pure-play’ companies it might have a more notable impact on the financials.

That said, irrelevant of where the favourable fortune has come from investors will be happy. $778.5 million represents a 20.5% year-on-year increase for the first quarter, while nearly all geographical markets have shown healthy growth.

“We began fiscal 2019 with a very strong first quarter performance, including outstanding top and bottom line growth as well as continued market share gains,” said Gary Smith, CEO of Ciena. “We believe that the combination of our leading innovation and positive industry dynamics will enable us to further extend our leadership position.”

Net income for the quarter stood at $33.6 million, though this is incomparable to the same period of 2018 which registered a loss of $473.4 million thanks to President Donald Trump’s US tax reform.

Looking at the regions, in the US, a market which now accounts for 62% of the company’s total revenues, the earnings grew just over 20% to $485.5 million, while 20% growth was also registered in the APAC region. The big success story however was in Europe, where the team grew the business by 32% to $129.2 million. This is still only 16.6% of the total haul for Ciena, but more geographical diversification will certainly be welcomed.

For Ciena, Europe could be a very interesting market over the next couple of months. With Huawei coming under increasing scrutiny globally, telcos will look to further diversify supply chains to add more resilience and protect themselves from potential government bans. While the anti-China rhetoric being spouted out by the White House is losing momentum, the European Union is reportedly looking some sort of ban, even if this puts the Brussels bureaucrats at odds with some member states.

For such vast investments, telcos will be looking for certainty and consistency from government policies. When looking at Huawei as a potential vendor, telcos will naturally be nervous, even if they don’t want to admit it.

With Huawei’s ban set to have little impact on the US market, it is not a major supplier to the market historically, the Europe could be a hidden goldmine for Ciena.

Interestingly enough, this scenario also seems to be paying off dividend in the APAC markets as well. Smith notes the success in the APAC region has come from Australia, Japan and Korea, three markets where Huawei has either been explicitly banned or is receiving a rather frosty welcome.

If you thought your January was tough, Vodafone Idea just lost 35mn subs

Most people consider January one of the worst months of the year, but Vodafone Idea could potentially trump your misery after reporting a year-on-year decline of 35 million subscriptions.

As is now commonplace with any CEO of a major business, Balesh Sharma was all a twirl spinning off the tough times of the quarter as positives, and in fairness there are some valid points. From a financial perspective, total revenues decreased 2% year-on-year to roughly £1.27 billion, while total subscriptions declined from 422.3 million in Q3 to 387.2 million for the last three months.

“We are progressing well on our stated strategy,” said Sharma. “The initiatives taken during the quarter started showing encouraging trends by the end of the quarter.

“We are moving faster than expected on integration, specifically on the network front, and we are well on track to deliver our synergy targets. We remain focused on fortifying our position in key districts by expanding the coverage and capacity of our 4G network, and target a higher share of new 4G customers, while offering an enhanced network experience to our customers. The proceeds from the announced capital raise will put us in a strong position to achieve our strategic goals.”

Looking at Sharma’s reasons, firstly on the revenues it might not be as bad as it looks. The most recent figures are being compared to a period where the two firms accounting policies were not aligned, while there was always going to be a bit of heavy going through the initial integration process. On the subscriptions front, the team blamed the fact that various customers consolidated spending from multiple to single SIMs.

On the 4G side of things, the total subscription base did increase to 75.3 million, up 9.5 million during the quarter, while coverage has also increased. The combined business is starting to generate notable benefits, national roaming was introduced on both networks, with each brand now offering 4G across all 22 service regions. During the three months, 11,123 4G sites were added to the network.

At first glance, this might not be the most comfortable reading, but you have to bear in mind this is a business which is starting to find its feet. Merging two businesses is never the easiest of jobs, but with the threat of Reliance Jio causing havoc everywhere Indian telco executives look, the pressure is certainly higher.

Reliance Jio has forced evolution onto the Indian telco industry, with victims scattered all over the landscape. The Telenor evacuation was first, Airtel is flagging, Reliance Communications has been decimated and the merger between Vodafone and Idea was the other major casualty. The team has to be given time to create a business which can provide suitable resistance to the Reliance Jio momentum, but Sharma will be wary he doesn’t have much.

Weak iPhone sales take bite out of Apple revenues

It might not come as a huge surprise, but the Apple financials are not as glorious and fruitful as the quarterly bonanza of yesteryear.

The devices market is plateauing, China’s economy is slowing, Indian consumers are more interested with other brands, iPhone sales are down, as is revenue and operating income, expenses are up. It doesn’t exactly paint a picture of serenity and profitability, but share price increased more than 5% in overnight trading.

CEO Tim Cook and his team did manage the situation quite effectively with a recent profit warning and have seemingly tabled a plan which has caught the interest of investors but let’s just put this overnight surge into perspective. The last couple of months have not been good for Apple. At the beginning of September, Apple share price was hovering around the $228 mark, while at the time of writing, it has declined more than 30% to $154. Cook should be nervous.

“Last night’s results beg the question, are investors falling out of love with Apple?” said Christopher Dembik, Head of Macro Analysis at Saxo Bank.

“The results of the former favourite stock – Apple was the fifth most traded stock by clients at Saxo Bank, behind Facebook, Amazon, Alibaba and Tesla – signalling a tough climate for traders right now with a gloomy global economy, weak returns across the board and whispers of another recession on the way.”

Apple Topline

Overall revenues were down to $84.3 billion, 5% lower than the same period in 2017, though it was in-line with the revised forecast from a few weeks back. For the next quarter, revenue is expected between $55 billion and $59 billion, with a gross margin between 37-38%.

Looking at the results, the iPhone weighed Apple down heavily. Shipment numbers will no-longer be released by the team, though revenues for the cornerstone product declined an almost inconceivable $9.1 billion, a 15% year-on-year drop, to $51.982 billion. This is still a huge amount of cash, but such a dramatic decline indicates someone got something very wrong somewhere.

The last couple of months of 2018 were a scrap for Apple to justify the pricing of its flagship devices. Cook and his cronies seem to have accepted what many people were telling them; the devices have become too expensive. Moving forward, the team seem to have indicated there will be price reductions.

This is what Apple have specialised in over the last few decades; customer loyalty and sweating the brand. There aren’t many cults out there who can count on their followers as loyally as Apple can count on the iLifers, but when the company was innovating they could justify marking a premium on products and rely on the Apple followers to make purchases. This doesn’t seem to be the case anymore.

If you look through the portfolio, none of the products are particularly mind-blowing. Yes, they might be high-spec and feature the Apple brand, but there has been little innovation in the last few years to justify the increasing prices. Married with consumers becoming more cash conscious, Apple has seemingly pushed its customers over the breaking point of what they are willing to spend.

That said, it isn’t just innovation which is to blame here, Apple is losing out to competitors in key markets. The Americas grew, though Europe, Japan and Greater China all declined. In the European and China markets, Chinese brands such as Huawei and One Plus has been gaining greater traction, with the price much more palatable for consumers. These are good devices which are offering just as technologically advanced features, suggesting Apple is losing the vice-like grip which it has on its customers.

Apple Breakdown

“And so, what we have done in January and in some locations and some products is essentially absorbed part or all of the foreign currency move as compared to last year and therefore get close or perhaps right on the local price from a year ago,” said Cook during the earnings call.

How much of an impact the price reductions will have remains to be seen, but what is worth noting is that there was some good news from the call. iPhone revenues might have plummeted over the period, but all other categories grew, including the much-valued software and services unit.

This is where Cook has been pinning his hopes, and there have been some gains. The software and services unit grew revenues by 19% year-on-year taking the total to $10.8 billion. Apple is attempting to evolve itself into a very different type of business, with recurring revenues as the ambition, though success has to be put into context. Yes, there have been gains, but it seems the dangers of the hardware world are being realised much faster than the benefits of software evolution.

Apple has largely struggled in the world of software and services, perhaps because its traditional business model is not suitable. When you look at where Apple has been successful in software and services, iTunes, AppleCare and iOS for example, these are all areas which tie the customer into the Apple ecosystem. They are products which build on the Steve Jobs mantra of ‘closed is better’. However, Apple will have to embrace a new mentality is it wants to succeed in the new world.

At CES, Apple captured most of the headlines without actually being there as it announced a content-based partnership with Samsung. Beginning in the Spring, new Samsung Smart TV models will offer iTunes Movies & TV Shows and Apple AirPlay 2 support for Apple customers. This is a good move from Apple, embracing the concepts of openness and collaboration which will be critical moving forwards.

Another interesting development, which has remained unconfirmed, is the creation of a Netflix-like gaming platform. Apple would herd developers and gaming content behind a paywall which will offered as a bundle service for customers. The subscription service would take Apple into a potentially profitable segment, which is set to boom over the coming years. However, this cannot be tied exclusively to Apple products and would have to demonstrate openness.

The last few months have shown that Apple is not immune to global trends and the need to evolve as a business is overdue. The reason companies like Google and Amazon never report revenue dips like this is they are constantly searching for the next idea. Apple might have been slow to react, but there is some progress being made. It just needs to be made quicker.

Netflix doubles profit but Wall Street not very happy

Netflix has increased its annual revenues by 35% and doubled profits over the course of 2018, but that didn’t prevent a 3.8% share price drop in overnight trading.

Total revenue across the 12-month period stood at $15.7 billion, though growth does seem to be slowing. Year-on-year revenue increases for the final three months were 27.4%, with 21.4% for the first quarter of 2019, though this compares to 40.4%, 40.3% and 34% in Q1, Q2 and Q3 respectively. However, when you consider the size, scale and breadth of Netflix nowadays this should hardly be considered surprising.

“For 20 years, we’ve been trying to please our members and it’s really the same focus year-after-year,” said CEO Reed Hastings during the earnings call.

“We’ve got all these ways to try to figure out, which shows work best, which product features work best, we’re a learning organization and it’s the same virtuous cycle, improve the service for our members. We grow. That gives us more money to invest. So, it’s the same things we’ve always been doing at just greater scale.”

This is perhaps the reason Netflix has succeeded in such a glorious manner where others have succumbed to mediocrity or failure. Investments have been massive to build out the breadth of content, while the team has not been afraid to alter its business or invest in content which others might snub. Bird Box is a classic example of a movie some might dismiss, whereas we find it difficult many competitors would have given the greenlight to the original Stranger Things pitch.

On the content side of things, investments over the last twelve months totalled $7.5 billion and Hastings promises this will increase in 2019. Perhaps we will not see the same growth trajectory, as despite the ambitions of the team, another objective for Netflix pays homage to the investors on Wall Street. Operating margin increased to 10% during 2018, up from 4% a couple of years back, though the team plan on upping this to 13% across 2019.

Content is where Netflix has crowned itself king over the last few years, aggressively pursuing a varied and deep port-folio, though it will be pushing the envelope further with interactive story-telling.

“I would just say there’s been a few false starts on interactive storytelling in the last couple of decades,” said Chief Content Officer, Ted Sarandos. “And I would tell you that this one has got storyteller salivating about the possibilities.

“So we’ve been talking to a lot of folks about it and we’re trying to figure it out too meaning is it novel, does it fit so perfectly in the Black Mirror world that it doesn’t – it isn’t a great indicator for how to do it, but we’ve got a hunch that it works across all kinds of storytelling and some of the greatest storytellers in the world are excited to dig into it.”

The team are attempting to figure out what works and what doesn’t for the interactive-story segment, but this is one of the reasons why people are attracted to Netflix. The team are exploring what is capable, brushing the dust away from the niche corners and experimenting with experience. They aren’t afraid of doing something new, and the audience is reacting well the this.

Looking at the numbers, Netflix added 8.8 million paid subscribers over the final three months of 2018, 1.5 million in the US and 7.3 million internationally, taking the total number of net additions to 29 million across the year. This compares to 22 million across 2017, while the team exceeded all forecasts.

However, this is where the problem lies for Netflix; can it continue to succeed when it is not diversifying its revenues?

According to independent telco, tech and media Analyst Paolo Pescatore, the Netflix team need to consider new avenues if they are to continue the exciting growth which we have seen over the last couple of years. New ideas are needed, partnerships with telcos is one but we’ll come back to that in a minute, some of which might be branching out into new segments.

This is perhaps most apparent in the US market, as while there is still potentially room for growth, this is a space which is currently saturated with more offerings lurking on the horizon. Over the next couple of months, Disney and AT&T are going to launching new streaming services, while T-Mobile US have been promising its own version for what seems like years. If Netflix is to continue to grow revenues, it needs to appeal to additional users, while also adding bolt on services to the core platform.

What could these bolt-on services look like remains to be seen, though Pescatore thinks a sensible route for the firm to take would be into gaming and eSports. These are two blossoming segments, as you can see from the Entertainment Retailers Association statistics here, which lend themselves well to the Netflix platform and business model. Another area could be music streaming, though as this market is dominating by Spotify and iTunes, as well one with low margins, it might not be considered an attractive diversification.

The other area which might is proving to be a success for the business are partnerships with telcos.

“It’s sort of been this March from integration on devices and just makes that a point to engage with the service to doing things like billing, on behalf of or we do billing integration,” said Greg Peters, Chief Product Officer.

“And now the latest sort of iteration that we’re working with is, is bundling model, right. And so, we’re early on in that process, but I would say we’re quite excited by the results that we’re seeing.”

This is a relatively small acquisition channel in comparison to others, but it is opening up the brand to new markets in the international space, a key long-term objective, and allowing the team to engage previously unreachable customers. This is an area which we should expect to grow and flourish.

The partnerships side of the business is one which might also add to the revenue streams and depth of content. Pescatore feels this is another area where Netflix can generate more revenue, as the team could potentially offer additional third-party content, hosting on its platform for users to rent or purchase. Referral fees could be an interesting way to raise some cash and Netflix certainly has the relationships with the right people.

Netflix has long been the darling of Wall Street, but it might not be for much longer. The streaming video segment is becoming increasingly congested, while the astronomical growth Netflix has experienced might come to a glass ceiling over the next couple of years. The businesses revenues are reliant on how quickly the customer base grows; such a narrow focus is not healthy. Everyone else is driving towards diversification, and Netflix will need to make sure it considers it sooner rather than later.

The HTC fall from grace is quite remarkable

In years gone, HTC was one of the most successful and sought-after smartphone brands worldwide, but time has not been kind for the Taiwanese firm as financials for 2018 emerge.

Back in 2012, your correspondent had a One X model HTC and it was a very good phone. Due to a slight malfunction more recently, there was also a couple of months with a second-hand HTC 10. It wasn’t a phone which set the world on fire (although ask Samsung how that went down), but it was a perfectly good device. Unfortunately, it appears the brand is just not doing enough right.

As you can see from the table below, 2018 has not been a kind year as the team brought in revenues of 23.7 billion New Taiwan Dollar (NTD), 61% down on 2017.

Month Revenue Year-on-year comparison
January 3,404 -27.03%
February 2,613 -44.04%
March 2,772 -46.66%
April 2,099 -55.47%
May 2,445 -46.03%
June 2,230 -67.64%
July 1,400 -77.41%
August 1,389 -53.72%
September 1,256 -80.71%
October 1,307 -78.44%
November 1,474 -73.98%
December 1,352 -66.36%
Full year 23,741 -61.78%

All figures in New Taiwan Dollar (millions)

Just as a comparison to previous years, in 2017 HTC brought in revenues of 62.120 billion NTD, 2016 was 78.161 billion NTD and 2015 was 121.684 billion NTD. If you go all the way back to 2012, the team brought in a remarkable 465.795 billion NTD.

Of course, you have to bear in mind the business has offloaded a substantial part of its business to Google for $1.1 billion, most notably c.2000 engineers who were working on the Pixel device anyway and a horde of IP, but HTC is still running as a standalone business. Back in November, Sprint announced it was partnering with Qualcomm and HTC to develop a mobile ‘smart hub’ that will run on 5G next year.

Every now and then it is useful just to look back through the years and remember how different things were. HTC used to be one of the mobile industry’s heavyweights, alas, no more. RIP HTC.

Apple points finger at China for financial woes

It seems the anti-China sentiment is pretty infectious as Apple pins the blame for the company’s shrinking bank account on the misery consumers hiding behind the Great Wall.

For years it seemed Apple was able to defy industry trends. Despite the fact global smartphone shipments were slowing, irrelevant to the fact there was little innovation emerging from the handset segment and in spite of charging a small fortune for the devices, Apple was still able to bleed the iCultists dry. However, now tt appears Apple’s immunity to the plague of normality is starting to wane.

Apple has revised its guidance for the first quarter of 2019, and there’s quite a bit missing. CEO Tim Cook explained the iLeader would only be bringing in roughly $84 billion across the three months which ended December 29, compared to the previous estimated range of $89-93 billion.

And China was of course to blame.

“While we anticipated some challenges in key emerging markets, we did not foresee the magnitude of the economic deceleration, particularly in Greater China,” said Cook. “In fact, most of our revenue shortfall to our guidance, and over 100 percent of our year-over-year worldwide revenue decline, occurred in Greater China across iPhone, Mac and iPad.”

This was not the only reason of course. The launch of the iPhone was too late, putting too much pressure on the channels in the lead up to Christmas. The US dollar was subject to FX swings. Supply could not meet demand. And finally, more people were holding onto their older devices instead of upgrading to new ones. All of these factors combined, plus weak performance in the emerging markets, resulted in a $5-8 billion hole.

It might be easy to blame the external factors here, and they would have almost certainly played a notable role, but perhaps Cook and co should look a bit more inwards to explain the current conundrum; when was the last time Apple did something genuinely innovative?

If you consider what devices are being brought to the market today, there are simply features and gimmicks which are better than what users had before. The age of innovation for the smartphone has temporarily ceased. This has been the case at Apple for some time, though now it appears the brand credit-line has run out. There are still iLifers out there who will upgrade when Cook snaps his fingers, but not as many as there used to be, and it does appear the idea of Apple as a status-symbol in China has died.

Apple has been the master of brand advertising, driving loyalty and asset-bleeding over the years, but this quarter might suggest the power of the Apple brand is beginning to fade due to a lack of innovation and extortionately expensive products. In every segment, Apple of course charges a premium, but it doesn’t necessarily mean the product is actually better. Is the iPhone XS better than the Huawei Mate 20 Pro? Or do the Airpods perform better than Bose? Is the Homepod the best smart speaker out there? Does the product justify the cost? Has the age of holding iLifers to ransom come to an end?

Unfortunately for Apple, at a time when innovation is at a premium a supply-chain expert is in charge of the business. The company might be the smoothest running machine around, but innovation has certainly lacked without Steve Jobs at the top, though the big question is whether the great mind of Jobs could squeeze out any new ideas in these meagre times.

After Cook announced the firm would stop detailing shipment numbers in the financial reports we should have all seen this coming, but what we have learned here is that not even Apple is immune to global trends. It can’t charge more an offer no added values in exchange. Its customers are just as cash conscious as others. New products require innovation to work.

Dell flies through Q3 with 15% revenue growth

Dell Technologies has reported its financials for the third quarter of 2018, with few complaining about15% revenue growth to $22.5 billion.

While the company still has a considerable bill to pay off following the $67 billion acquisition of EMC in 2016, the firm has boasted about paying off approximately $1.3 billion of core debt after three months of positive growth across the group.

“The digital transformation of our world is underway, and we are in the early stages of a massive, technology-led investment cycle,” said Michael Dell, CEO of Dell Technologies. “Dell Technologies was created to meet this opportunity head on for our customers and our investors. You can see the proof in our strong growth, in our powerful innovation and in the depth of our customer relationships.”

With total revenues standing at $22.482 billion, most of the numbers are heading in the right direction. The company is still loss-making, though this has narrowed to $356 million for the last three months and $522 million for 2018 so far, improvements of 13% and 78% respectively compared to the same periods of 2017.

Starting with the Infrastructure Solutions Group, revenue for the third quarter was $8.9 billion, a 19% increase, with the servers and networking delivering its sixth consecutive quarter of double-digit revenue growth. Storage products saw a 6% increase in revenues taking the total up to $3.9 billion.

The Client Solutions Group saw revenues increase by 11% to $10.9 billion, with Dell suggested strong growth in both the commercial and consumer units. Commercial revenue grew 12% to $7.6 billion, and Consumer revenue was up 8% to $3.3 billion, while the firm outperformed the PC industry for total worldwide units.

In the VMWare business unit, revenue for the third quarter was $2.2 billion, up 15%, with operating income of $768 million. This is one area where the Dell management team feel some of the biggest benefits of the EMC acquisition are being felt, with the dreaded ‘synergies’ tag emerging. However, it’s the external AWS partnership which seems to be claiming the majority of the plaudits.

“Overall, I think yesterday’s announcement at re:Invent just reinforced the momentum that we have in the partnership with Amazon,” said Patrick Gelsinger, CEO of VMWare. “And clearly, the VMware Cloud on AWS, we continue to see great customer uptake for that. We reinforce the expansion of that with the Relational Database Service, the RDS announcement that we did at VMworld and yesterday’s Outposts announcement just puts another pillar in that relationship. So now I’d say, we’re on Chapter 3 of the partnership. And overall, we just can see the continued momentum.”

Dell Technologies is not a company which get a huge amount of press inches nowadays, though trends are certainly heading in the right direction here.

Softbank is now more of a VC than a telco group

Back in 2016 when Softbank CEO Masayoshi Son announced plans for the $100 billion Vision Fund it looks like a ludicrous plan, but with such incredible growth perhaps we should ask whether Son has been missing his calling for decades.

Looking at the financials for the first half of 2018, the most interesting story aspect is linked back to the Softbank Vision Fund (SVF) and Delta Fund (DF) investment bodies. Over the first six months, net sales for the Softbank Group came in at roughly $41 billion, with the team collecting an operating income of roughly $12.5 billion. The operating income attributable to the SVF and DF is $5.7 billion, roughly 45%.

45% might sound like a good number, but it becomes even more impressive when you consider how the funds are accelerating. In the first three months of 2018, the funds accounted for approximately 33% of operating income, but this ratio increases to 55% when you look at the second quarter alone. As you can see from the table below, the cash being generated by the funds is quickly racking up.

Q3 2017 Q4 2017 Q1 2018 Q2 2018
Gain on investments for SVF and DF $530 million $860 million 2.18 billion 3.55 billion
Realized gain on investments NA NA NA 1.29 billion
Unrealized gain on valuation of investments $490 million $830 million $2.24 billion $2.27 billion
Interest and dividend from investments $33 million $20 million $12 million $10 million

(Approximate values after currency conversion)

The fund itself, which has come under pressure recently due to involvement from Saudi Arabia, has consistently been consistently questioned by investors, though perhaps monstrous profit is a language which they will be more familiar with. Son has prioritised artificial intelligence in a portfolio which contains investments in Uber, Nvidia, Arm, GM Cruise, Doordash and Compass. The only one which doesn’t really fit into the family is WeWork, a shared office business which would be more comfortable inside a real-estate investment portfolio. That said, few will argue with the results.

Looking at the rest of the business, the story is pretty positive if less glamorous next to these monstrous profits. Total revenues and profits are up in the Softbank telco business, while the net gain on customer subscriptions is up approximately 1.2 million in comparison to the same period of 2017. Churn was also at a healthy 0.93% for the quarter and ARPU is flat. Not a bad return for the period. Sprint in another which is performing surprisingly well. Although subscription numbers are down sequentially, year-on-year Sprint managed to find 520,000 subscriptions from somewhere.

Son’s traditional stomping ground is looking very healthy, though with the acceleration of the VCs you really have to wonder whether the audacious businessman has been in the wrong industry all these years.