Samsung profit is halved, company guidance warns

Samsung, the world’s largest smartphone and memory chip maker, warned the market its quarterly profit would drop by 56%, prior to the official result announcement later this month.

Samsung Electronics told the market that the operating profit generated in the quarter ending 30 June amounted to KRW 6.5 trillion ($5.55 billion), which would be a 4% sequential improvement on Q1 this year, but would represent a 56% drop from the same quarter a year ago. The total revenue is expected to be around KRW 56 trillion ($47.8 billion), a 7% sequential growth, but 4% year-on-year decline. The continued depressed profitability (operating margin almost unchanged from last quarter at 12%, compared with 25% a year ago) indicates Samsung’s main business has not turned the corner.

The semiconductor sector, where Samsung has generated the highest profit among all of its business units, remains weak. Last month investment analysts from the private fund Evercore reported that the inventory of memory chips by downstream device makers continued to be at excessively high level, therefore the investors did not see the sector recover before 2020.

The IT & Mobile communication unit, which has generated the highest revenue for Samsung, is still in trouble. Samsung has braced intensive competition particularly from the Chinese competitors, and its Galaxy S10 series have not been able to turn its fortune. The troubled launch of the Fold version of S10, which had been slated for Q2, has still yet to happen. A new Unpacked event has just been announced for August, but is likely to unveil its new tablet, the Galaxy Note 10, to consider the stylus featured on the event invitation.

When faced with pressure on profit, companies often turn to control cost. That looks to be what Samsung has been doing. A few days ago The Economic Times of India reported that Samsung will cut 1,000 jobs from the company’s smartphone functions. This is after 150 jobs are already gone in Samsung’s telecom infrastructure team.

Broadcom hit by friendly-fire in US/China trade war

Broadcom has unveiled its financial results for the last three months, though it isn’t the rosy picture some might have hoped for as ‘continued geopolitical uncertainties’ weigh heavy on the spreadsheets.

Although total revenues were up 10% from the same period of 2018 to $5.5 billion, the team has lowered its forecast for the remainder of the financial year. The new forecast for 2019 is now $22.5 billion, $2 billion lighter than the team was initially aiming for.

“We currently see a broad-based slowdown in the demand environment, which we believe is driven by continued geopolitical uncertainties, as well as the effects of export restrictions on one of our largest customers,” said CEO Hock Tan.

“As a result, our customers are actively reducing their inventory levels, and we are taking a conservative stance for the rest of the year.”

Although not mentioned here, guessing who Tan is referring to is not the most taxing of tasks. While Broadcom does not have as much exposure to Huawei as some US firms, it is its biggest customer; the unintended consequences (or at least we hope they were unintended) of President Trump’s Executive Order continue to pile up.

Estimates might vary, though the general consensus is that Huawei, the world’s largest manufacturer of telecoms equipment, purchases around $20 billion of semiconductors each year. Broadcom is being impacted here, though Qualcomm, Intel, Xilinx and several other smaller firms will also be feeling the pinch.

Although the year-on-year stats are still encouraging, investors might be a bit turned off by the sequential 4.7% decrease in revenues. Net income stood at $691 million, though this is not comparable to the year as this was the period Broadcom realised the benefits of changes to tax laws in the US.

The last couple of years have certainly been an interesting saga for Broadcom. Having shifted its HQ to the US in an effort to buy favour with authorities while attempting to acquire Qualcomm, the transaction was eventually blocked by the White House on the grounds of national security. With financials now being hit because of the anti-China mission of the Oval Office, Tan must be wondering why he bothered to cosy up with the US.

How long can Uber keep bleeding cash?

It is becoming increasingly popular to invest in money-bleeding technology giants in preparation of an inflection point in profits, but you have to wonder how long Uber will be able to hold on for.

Uber is a massive brand, an innovator and genuine disruptor to the status quo. There are few examples of a concept riding the wave of digital to create such a severe disturbance to the traditional world. And while Uber might be the biggest transportation brand in the digital era, it is haemorrhaging cash quarter-on-quarter. Other segments have demonstrated there will be an inflection point, the moment of glory horrendous losses are turned into monstrous profits, but that scenario might be a long-way off for Uber.

Looking at the quarterly results, revenues grew to $3.09 billion for the period, a 20% increase year-on-year, but net loss from operations was $1.03 billion. This is 116% more than it lost in the same period of 2018.

The losses are certainly starting to mount as well. In the final quarter of 2018, Uber reported a net loss of $865 million. In Q4, the loss was slightly worse at $939 million. In this period of 2018, the firm reported net loss of $478 million from operations.

In the digital economy, investors are seemingly happy to swallow negatives, Uber’s share price following the announcement of the financials is holding steady, though how long can the potential remain potential?

Encouraging these investors are companies like Amazon and Netflix. In both of these cases, the firm build a dominant position in the respective segments, scaled globally, attracted millions of customers and then turned attentions to profits. Uber might be able to do the same thing, it is following the same trends, though there are sceptical voices.

Some might suggest Uber will continue to be a loss-making company until autonomous vehicles emerge. The theory is sound, after all a company’s biggest overhead is staff. Uber will be able to free up billions once the technology is perfected, making it a very profitable company. However, it might be decades before autonomous vehicles are a realistic prospect on the streets.

The technology might not be far away, but there are so many other moving parts which need to be factored in. Firstly, will people trust handing control of vehicles to machines? Are regulations and legislation in place to facilitate the introduction of this technology? How long will it take parallel industries, such as insurance, to ready themselves? Is the infrastructure, both roads and mobile connectivity, ready for autonomous vehicles? Have safety concerns been appropriately addressed?

There are so many factors to consider, the progression of autonomous vehicles is much more than technology. It might be decades before self-driving cars hit the streets; can investors wait that long for the Uber inflection point?

There is also an interesting, and slightly nefarious, philosophical question to consider when it comes to programming the artificial intelligence component of the technology.

Let’s say a car is driving down the street, travelling at 20 mph when a child steps into the road. The child is within the braking distance of the car therefore it is physically impossible to stop the vehicle in time. There are three options for the AI to choose from:

  1. Continue driving forward and potentially kill the child
  2. Turn sharply left and potentially drive into pedestrians
  3. Turn sharply right and potentially drive into on-coming traffic

In each of these scenarios, there is the potential for a fatality. But here is the issue; the AI will have to make a ‘conscious’ choice, the outcome might mean death, and the software engineer will have to write the software deciding how the AI will react.

The reason why this is different to today’s driving condition is because a human reacts without thinking through the possible outcomes. We cannot assess the information fast enough and react with a logical action, but AI can.

This scenario is of course highly unlikely, sensors and cameras on street furniture might be able to warn the vehicle of the on-going hazard, but it is a possibility therefore the AI has to be programmed to decide. There is no right answer here, but the AI is flawed unless a decision on what course of action to take is made.

Some might suggest the option with the smallest percentage chance for a fatality should be taken, but the risk of a fatality is still there. Because the vehicle has made a decision, should someone be held accountable if someone dies as a result of the action? This is a very complicated area.

So, if autonomous vehicles are out of the question for years to come, Uber will have to think of other ways to make money.

Uber Eats is proving to be a profitable venture for the firm, while the management team has promised to cut back on promotions which might carve into profits. But will these side ventures compensate for the way the core business and R&D businesses are churning through cash. What is clear, Uber needs to stop bleeding cash in such a dramatic fashion or credibility with investors might start to run dry.

UK and Latin America gave Telefónica a steady Q1

Telefónica’s otherwise flat quarter was bolstered by strong performance in its UK and Latin America South units, which delivered 5.3% and 15.2% organic growth rates, taking the group level growth rate to 3.8%.

Telefónica reported its first-quarter results, with the total revenue at €12.611 billion, an increase of 3.8% in organic terms. This means adjustments were made to the reported numbers considering impacts of exchange rate moves, regulation and reporting standard changes, and special factors, for example adjustment made to the Argentina numbers on account of the hyper-inflation. Otherwise, the total revenue would have reported at € 11.979, or a 1.7% decline from a year ago. The quarterly operating income before depreciation and amortisation (OIBDA) reached €4.264 billion, up by 10.3%; and the net income grew by 10.6% to reach €926 million.

The Telefónica group is now serving a total of 332 million subscriber accounts (“accesses”), 6 million less than a year ago. The total mobile accesses by the end of the quarter stood at 267 million, down by 4 million from a year ago. But the good news for Telefónica is that it actually grew the contract customer base by 7.5 million over Q1 last year, meaning the loss is mainly on the pre-paid market, down by 11.5 million. It also grew its fixed broadband (including FTTx and cable) customer base by 2.1 million over the course of the year.

“The first quarter results showed a significant improvement in revenue growth trends and double-digit growth in net income and earnings per share. Strong cash generation, which was three times higher than the figure reported in the first quarter of the previous year, allowed for an acceleration in debt reduction, for the 8th consecutive quarter, further strengthening our balance sheet,” commented José María Álvarez-Pallete, Chairman and CEO of Telefónica. “We have started the year by extending our leadership in fibre and 4G deployment, testing new 5G capabilities and making progress in the UNICA virtualisation programme, allowing us to continue gaining customer relevance through better experience and higher average lifetime.”

Ángel Vilá, Chief Operating Officer of Telefónica, introduced the Q1 results and its outlook to 2019 annual outlook in more detail in the video clip at the bottom (in Spanish, with English subtitle).

While the its two biggest markets, Spain and Brazil, managed to stay stable, delivering modest organic growth of 0.3% and 1.7% respective (+0.3% and -5.2% in reported terms), Telefónica’s UK business registered a strong 5.3% organic growth to reach €1.67 billion (£1.47 billion). Excluding the exchange rate impact, the UK business would have reported a 6.6% revenue growth to reach €1.691 billion (£1.488 billion). The company is now serving 32.7 million mobile subscribers, up 2.3% over Q1 last year, which includes both customers on O2 (25.1 million) and those on the MVNOs using Telefónica networks (Sky Mobile, giffgaff, Lycamobile, and Tesco Mobile).

“This is another good set of results building on our momentum from 2018. We have delivered further revenue and customer growth underpinned by our award-winning network and market-leading loyalty,” commented Mark Evans, CEO of Telefónica UK. “We are committed to making every day better, providing customers with compelling reasons to join and stay with us through attractive propositions such as O2 Custom Plans.”

Looking across all the Telefónica markets, the UK registered the lowest churn rate of 0.9% among in its postpaid customers. In comparison, in Telefónica’s other European markets, the churn rate of contract customers was 1.6% in Germany and 1.7% in Spain. Comparable churn rates in markets like Chile and Mexico ran around 3%.

Telefónica attributed high customer loyalty, among other things, to its aggressive investment to improve its networks. The company claims it is investing equivalent to £2 million a day to strengthen its network and increase its reach.

One of O2’s focus investment areas in 2019, in addition to the planned launch of 5G, will be high density venues, including sports arenas, shopping centres, hotels, and conference centres. Already serving the Anfield Stadium in Liverpool and the Lord’s cricket ground in London with improved networks, in collaboration with the Wireless Infrastructure Group (WIG), an infrastructure company, O2 is planning to upgrade and improve its coverage and capacities in other high usage venues.

“While we look ahead to 5G we also continue to focus on our existing network capability. We strive to deliver a great network experience to all our customers, including some of the UK’s busiest locations where network demand is at its peak,” said Brendan O’Reilly, O2’s Chief Technology Officer. “Our multi-million pound investment with our partners at WIG should provide O2 customers with even better connectivity in the places they love to visit.”

Here’s more commentary from COO Ángel Vilá.

Samsung’s profit crashes on weak semiconductor sales

Samsung Electronics reported a net profit decline of 57% in Q1, with total revenue going down by 14%. The semiconductor unit suffered the worst.

Samsung’s quarterly revenue went down from KRW60.56 trillion ($52 billion) a year ago to KRW52.39 ($45 billion) in Q1. The gross margin level came down from 47.3% to 37.5%. The operating profit dropped to KRW6.23 trillion ($5.3 billion) from KRW15.64 trillion ($13 billion), a decline of 60.2%. The net profit came down by 57% to KRW5.04 trillion ($4.4 billion).

 Samsung 2019_1Q_income

On business unit level, Device Solutions reported a 27% drop in revenue, the sharpest decline among all the business units. Inside the unit, Memory chips declined by 34%. Samsung attributed the weakness to “inventory adjustments at major customers”, indicating its customers including other smartphone makers, have been selling slower than expected.

IT & Mobile Communications, Samsung’s largest business unit by sales, the business was more stable. Revenue from the handset business dropped by 4% from a year ago, but grew sequentially by 17%. Samsung saw strong demand for its Galaxy S10 products, but the de-focus of mid-range and lower products limited the volume growth. The recent debacle of S10 fold, high profile as it may be, should not have had any material impact on Q1 as it was scheduled to launch in Q2. Samsung’s network business, though small in comparison to its competitors, reported a strong revenue growth of 62% to reach KRW1.28 trillion ($1.1 billion), benefiting from the “accelerating commercialization of 5G in Korea”.

Samsung 2019_1Q_BU

Samsung gave cautious lift to its outlook for Q2 but more optimistic with the second half of the year. It foresees the memory chip market stabilising in Q2 and stronger growth in the second half due to seasonality and product line refreshing. On the mobile side, Samsung sees growth in shipment in Q2 thanks to continued demand for the S10 products and positive market response to its new mid-range A series. It sees the 5G products and the fold form-factor making material contribution in the second half.

Defiant Huawei reports 20% revenue growth

In spite of the growing geopolitical spat it has found itself in the centre of, Huawei reported $107 billion in total revenues for the 2018 financial year, up 20% year-on-year.

The consumer business unit is now clearly the most successful, though there is still minor momentum in the carrier business. This is the unit which has been suffering the most through the political scrutiny, though there have been some rays of sunshine.

Although the consumer business unit grew 45%, astronomical growth in an overarching sluggish segment, revenues in the carrier business declined by 1% year-on-year. This business unit has declined, but when you consider context, few will complain with these figures.

A 1% decline is still a decline, but Huawei has now collected 39 5G commercial contracts and shipped 50,000 5G base stations globally. In the month since Mobile World Congress, Huawei has collected an additional five contracts and shipped 10,000 base stations. Not a bad return for a business which has become the political punching bag of the world.

“Through heavy, consistent investment in 5G innovation, alongside large-scale commercial deployment, Huawei is committed to building the world’s best network connections,” said Guo Ping, Huawei’s Rotating Chairman (pictured).

“Throughout this process, Huawei will continue to strictly comply with all relevant standards to build secure, trustworthy, and high-quality products. As we work towards this goal, we have been explicitly clear: Cyber security and user privacy protection are at the absolute top of our agenda.”

Looking at the numbers, total revenues hit roughly $107 billion, year-on-year growth of 20%, while profits jumped 25% to $8.8 billion. This is a slight dip on the 27% growth from twelve months ago, but it is still a very strong performance. The consumer unit clawed in roughly $51.98 billion, the carrier business accounted for $43.80 billion and enterprise brought in the majority of the rest. A very small fourth business unit focusing on cloud is worth keeping an eye on, but today this is less than 1% of the group’s total revenues.

Taken in isolation, you wouldn’t think this is a company which is facing intense scrutiny and aggression from US politicians. The numbers tell a healthy story, but we all know there is a political storm brewing around the vendor.

This week has seen another hurdle thrown in front of the Huawei thundering train, with the Huawei Cyber Security Evaluation Centre (HCSEC) releasing a new report questioning the ability of the vendor to fix software mistakes. The HCSEC has stopped short of calling for a ban, however it is a damning opinion on Huawei’s security credentials.

As we understand it, Huawei was informed of the report 48 hours prior to its publication and while it will not necessarily be thrilled with the outcome, it will have to swallow the opinion. Huawei’s DNA is built in the hardware world therefore it is unsurprising the firm is suffering some complications in the software segments. However, Huawei is unlikely to be alone in with this challenge.

Huawei’s competitors are facing the same challenge having also evolved from the hardware businesses. All of these vendors are learning the ropes, adapting business culture and attempting to link up different acquisitions into a fluid, cohesive offering. Huawei is facing criticism, partly as it is a proxy for the Chinese government, though software is a difficult business which everyone is finding challenging.

Ultimately these numbers tell a story which we have suspected might been the case for a while. Huawei is not a company which will be killed off by the political climate, but it will not dominate the 5G era in the same way it championed the 4G.

Despite a $1 billion loss ZTE is seeing light at the end of the tunnel

The Chinese telecom vendor ZTE reported a total annual net loss of over $1 billion from its business in 2018 but is foreseeing returning to profit in Q1 2019.

After a roller-coaster year, ZTE reported a total operating revenue of RMB 85.5 billion ($12.7 billion, at the exchange rate $1=RMB6.7233) in 2018, a 21.4% decline from a year ago. The net loss amounted to RMB 6.9837 billion ($1.04 billion), down from a net profit of RMB 4.57 billion from 2017, or a decline of 253%. After pulling off a surprising return to profit in Q3 last year,  the net profit in Q4 came down to RMB 276 million, narrowed by more than a half from the RMB 564 million from the previous quarter, despite that the quarterly revenue increased by over 38%.

When looking at the results by business lines and by sector, we can see that its consumer business, mainly smartphones, which account for more than a quarter of ZTE’s business before the US sanction, suffered the heaviest decline. The unit’s total revenue came down by 45%, and only accounted for 22% of the total business in 2018. The revenue from carrier’s network business shrank by 10.5%, and that from B2B business including public sector was down by 6%.

When it came to its performances in different markets, the heaviest decline came from its business in mature markets in Europe, Americas and Oceania, where the revenues dropped by 45%, followed by that from Asia, which was down by 25%. The domestic market, representing 63.7% of ZTE’s total business, suffered a decline of 12%. Its business in Africa actually registered a growth of 8.4%, despite that it only accounted for less than 5% of ZTE’s total business. Incidentally, it was in Africa that ZTE reaped the highest gross margin of 48%, compared to 38% in China, and only 13% in Europe, Americas and Oceania.

The decline of the annual total business could largely be attributed to the heavy fines of $1.4 billion ZTE had to pay the US government for the settlement in the middle of last year, in addition to the wholesale change of management and the board. The market has chosen to look at the upside after the ban was lifted. Its share price had already gone up by over 50% by the end of last year and has now more than doubled the low of last July.

Looking forward, ZTE predicted that it would generate between RMB 0.8 billion and RMB 1.2 billion ($119 million to $178 million) net profit during Q1. To power future growth, the company spent 12.8% of its income on R&D during 2018 and will continue to do so this year. In particular, ZTE “has continuously concentrated on the core 5G technical fields and further intensified 5G R&D investment.”

However, 5G is a long play, and is a game that there is no guarantee ZTE will win. The prospects in China, by far ZTE’s biggest market, are less than certain, as the Chinese operators are among the cautious ones when it comes to 5G investment. Africa and Pakistan, where the company has a relatively strong position, are not going to deliver results from 5G very soon. In Europe and North America, where its customer base is already limited, ZTE has been included in the list of “Chinese vendors” which the US government is lobbying to ban, despite the limelight is often on Huawei, ZTE’s arch-rival.

Samsung warns profit could half on weak chip and display demand

The world leader in smartphones and chips has released a profit warning for its Q1 results, due to be announced next month. Analysts estimate its operating profit could halve from a year ago.

The company announced that it would miss market expectations, due to hard hits for sales in its key display and semiconductor business units. “The company expects the scope of price declines in main memory chip products to be larger than expected,” said Samsung.

Semiconductor and display have been the major revenue and profit generators for Samsung Electronics over the last few years. In 2018, these two business lines, combined to form Samsung “Device Solutions” (DS) business unit, delivering 49% of total revenues and 79% of its operating profit. However, it has already come under pressure. In Q4 last year, the operating profit of DS dropped by 29% from a year ago.

This communication should not come entirely as a surprise. In the company’s AGM on 20 March, Samsung already outlined its 2019 outlook for both the overall business and for individual business units. On the macro business environment, Samsung predicted “In 2019, we expect business conditions to remain difficult as global trade conflicts persist and changes in monetary policies of developed nations may lead to financial uncertainties in emerging economies.”

On the semiconductor front, especially for NAND business, Samsung warned “uncertainty persists over supply-demand dynamics caused by capacity expansions in the industry and a potential slowdown in demand following inventory stocking by customers.” On the display business Samsung expected “conditions to worsen in 2019 as competition rises amid a relatively stagnant market.”

Samsung did not give more specific indicators on the level of miss, but investment analysts predicted the company to report a $6.4 billion operating profit for Q1, down from $13.8 billion in Q1 last year, with revenues expected to come down to $47.4 billion from $53.5 billion, according to Refinitiv SmartEstimate.

“Inventories piling up on its memory chip side and the weak performance of its display panels business due to bad sales of Apple’s iPhones are hurting profitability for Samsung,” said Lee Won-sik, an analyst at Shinyoung Securities, quoted by Reuters.

The soft smartphone market including that experienced by Apple, Samsung’s main rival as well as customer, has been attributed the main reason behind the difficulty. But Samsung believed it could turn things around, especially the demand for memory products, in the second half of the year, as it told the shareholders last week.

Samsung Electronics share price went down by 0.55% at the time of writing.

Oracle reports flat growth as cloud segment booms

As a late-comer to the increasingly profitable cloud segment, Oracle has yet to make more than a minor dent, and this quarter appears to be another demonstration of mediocrity.

The company stopped reporting its cloud business revenues as a standalone during last year, so it is difficult to give a complete picture, though total revenues tell a part of the story. Total Revenues were $9.6 billion, down 1% year-on-year, though once constant currencies are applied the boost was 3%. Combined with a outlook which promises a range of 0% growth to negative 2% (1% to 3% growth in constant currency), its not necessarily the prettiest of pictures.

This is not to say Oracle is in a terrible position, the company is still profitable, and the growth prospects of the cloud segment encourage optimism, but it is not capturing the fortunes of its competitors.

Despite the heritage and continued influence of this business, perhaps we should not be surprised Oracle is not tearing up trees today. Back in 2008, CTO and founder Larry Ellison described the technology industry as the only segment “which is more fashion driven than women’s fashion”, suggesting cloud was nothing more than a passing fad.

Hindsight is always 20/20, but after this condemning statement about the embryonic cloud industry you can see why Oracle is reporting average numbers while others are hoovering up the cloud cash. Despite this late start, in 2016 Oracle felt it had caught up, with Ellison declaring “Amazon’s lead is over” during an earnings call.

While executives can make all the claims they like, reeling off various customer wins and pointing towards heritage in the technology industry, the numbers speak for themselves. Oracle is not profiting from the cloud bonanza in the same way competitors are.

Alongside the effectively flat revenue growth, Non-GAAP net income in Q3 was down 8% to $3.2 billion, while the merged cloud revenues and license support unit grew, it was only by roughly 1.1%. When you consider AWS, Google, IBM, Microsoft and Alibaba are all quoted numbers which are notably higher than this, it does paint a relatively gloomy picture.

Recent data from Synergy suggests revenues for 2018 passed the $250 billion across seven key cloud services and infrastructure market segments, operator and vendor revenues, representing a 32% increase year-on-year. Oracle will of course not be applicable for all of these segments however the overarching cloud trends are incredibly positive.

That said, perhaps the most damning piece of evidence is these numbers met analyst expectations. The team should be applauded for this fact however, it does suggest the analyst community no-longer consider Oracle a front-runner in the technology world. If the estimates are mediocre when the ingredients for success are so abundant, it doesn’t make for the most positive perception of one of yesteryears heavyweights.

Investment bank backs the BT waiting game

Don’t expect BT to give too much away over the next couple of months, but investment bank Jefferies thinks there is enough there to make the telco a good bet.

The arrival of new BT CEO Philip Jansen has sparked the prospect of the telcos revival, at least from a share price perspective, though Jefferies believes cards will be held very close to the chest for the moment. Don’t expect too much insight on future strategies over the near-future, but the foundations seem steady enough to put BT in a solid position.

The last few years have not made for comfortable reading for many BT investors. In November 2015, share price stood at £4.99. This was not a historical high, but it was a peak in recent memory. Since that point, share price has declined 56% after gains from EE remained elusive, the Openreach position was challenged and a disastrous entry into the content game. Under former-CEO Gavin Patterson, BT entered a slump.

That said, in January BT reported positive results, suggesting the restructuring process implemented over the last 12 months was setting the foundations for recovery. Jansen was entering a business which was in a reasonable position.

“BT welcomes its new CEO with foundations to build on, not a slate to wipe clean,” the Jefferies investor note states.

However, with Jansen’s first earnings call just weeks away, don’t expect too much insight on BT’s future strategy. With Ofcom’s Access Review still yet to see the light of day, it would be “illogical” for BT to make too much of a commitment in the near future.

Depending on the outcome of this review, there might be room for Openreach to consider premiums on FTTP, there might be demands to increase CAPEX, there might be a need to cut Dividend Per Share (DPS). There are too many maybe’s floating around the regulatory uncertainty created by government ambitions to fibre-up 15 million UK homes by 2025.

While there is a suggestion DPS growth might freeze or reverse, this could allow BT to redirect funds towards the CAPEX column at Openreach. This could assist the telco in creating a friendlier relationship with Ofcom, an outcome which would be beneficial for everyone involved.

Jefferies feels there are too many unknowns for the telco to make any concrete commitments moving forward, but in encouraging customers to Buy BT, there is seemingly a lot of confidence.