Finland joins the quest for quantum computing strengths

The Technical Research Centre of Finland is going to build the country’s first quantum computer, joining a growing European contingent to compete at the front of next generation computing technology.

VTT, Finland’s state-owned Technical Research Centre (Teknologian tutkimuskeskus VTT Oy) announced that it will design and build the country’s first quantum computer, in partnership with “progressive Finnish companies from a variety of sectors”, aiming to “bolster Finland’s and Europe’s competitiveness” in this cutting-edge technology.

“In the future, we’ll encounter challenges that cannot be met using current methods. Quantum computing will play an important role in solving these kinds of problems,” said Antti Vasara, CEO of VTT. Referring to the country’s challenge of post-COVID-19 recover, Vasara said “it’s now even more important than ever to make investments in innovation and future technologies that will create demand for Finnish companies’ products and services.”

The multi-year project, with a total cost estimated about €20-25 million, will run in phases. The first checkpoint will be about a year from now, when VTT targets to “get a minimum five-qubit quantum computer in working order”, it said in the press release. Qubit, or “quantum bit”, is the basic information unit in quantum computing, analogous to binary digit, or “bit”, in classical computing.

In all fairness, this is a modest target on a modest budget. To put the 5-qubit target into perspective, by late last year, Google claimed that its quantum computer had achieve 53-qubit computing power. It could perform a task in 200 seconds that would take Summit, one of IBM’s supercomputers, 2.5 days by IBM’s own admission. By the time of writing, VTT has not responded to Telecoms.com’s question on the project’s ultimate target.

When it comes to budget, the VTT amount is easily dwarfed by the more ambitious projects. Although the most advanced quantum computers in the world are developed and run by the leading American technology companies and academic institutions, for example the MIT, IBM, and Google. But other parts of the world are quickly building their own facilities, including businesses and universities in Japan, India, China, and Europe. One of the high-profile cases recently is IBM’s decision to build Europe’s first commercial quantum computer in German’s state-backed research institute in Fraunhofer, near Stuttgart.

In addition to getting closer to and better serving the European markets in the future, IBM’s decision to build a quantum computer in Europe is also to do with GDPR requirement. While European businesses can use IBM’s quantum computer located in the US, through the cloud, they may hesitate when sending user data outside of the EU. The Fraunhofer project has been personally endorsed by Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor. The federal government has pledged €650 million investment for quantum computing, though not in the Fraunhofer project alone.

When it comes to quantum computing applications in the communications industry, at least two areas it can have strong impact. The first is security. Quantum computing will enable new modes of cryptography. The second is new materials. Daimler, the carmaker, has already used IBM’s quantum computers to design new batteries for its electric cars by simulating the complex molecule level chemistry inside the battery cells. On top of batteries, another research topic in new materials in the communications industry is to find silicon replacement as semiconductor in extremely high radio spectrums.

Despite its modest scope, the VTT undertaking is significant. Not only does it give Finland the right to boast of being the first Nordic country to build its own quantum computer, the success of the project would “provide Finland with an exceptional level of capabilities in both research and technology”. Faced with the worst economic crisis since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Nordic nation is looking to technology breakthroughs for sustainable revival and long-term competitiveness. Quantum computing capability of this project, if not pursuing supremacy, limited by its scope, may at least give Finland the table stake.

Telia Finland is doing its bit to help combat coronavirus

The Finnish branch of Telia is supporting government policy making with real-time, but anonymised, user movement data and helping SMEs  with ad minutes giveaways.

To prevent government policies becoming knee-jerk reactions, precise data is critical. In countries where the population takes privacy rights seriously, there needs to be a fine balance between what the government should know and what should be kept out of its reach.

Telia Finland recently announced it is providing the Finnish government with anonymised data of user movement between cities and regions. The government can evaluate the effectiveness of its policies as well as use the data as basis for new measures to contain and supress the spread of the coronavirus.

Called ‘Telia Crowd Insights’, the data is drawn from Telia’s network, then anonymised and analysed on an aggregated basis. Theoretically, data cannot be traced back to individual customers.

“We collect the information from a large geographical area, which makes it impossible to identify individuals. After this, the fully anonymized and aggregated data can be expanded into views with which decision-makers can draw accurate conclusions on the movements of the masses from,” said Petri Seppänen, Head of Business Development at Telia.

“With our service, we can contribute to controlling the situation with the coronavirus and support authorities with knowledge-based management. We have rapidly tailored a report on top of our standard Crowd Insights product, specifically suitable for this exceptional situation,” Seppänen added. He also suggested that if the current initiative proves useful for the Finnish Government Telia may provide similar support to governments in other Nordic countries

Since the beginning of March, the Finnish government has adopted a phased approached to restraining social contact as a means to break the chain of virus spread. The Telia data will prove useful to test the effectiveness of the most recently policy to put under strict control the transport connection between Uusimaa, the region in south Finland where the capital area is located and where the COVID-19 cases are most concentrated, and the rest of the country.

So far Finland has coped better than her Nordic neighbours. The total number of 28 deaths, at the time of writing, puts the mortality rate per million population at 5, compared with 9 in Norway and 29 in Denmark, both of which have much stricter lockdowns in place for longer. The highest mortality rate per million population among the Nordic countries is seen in Sweden at 36.

Meanwhile it is apparent that the onslaught of COVID-19 and the government policies to lock down social life, has made the small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) particularly vulnerable. This is bad news for countries like Finland where there are only a small number of big, multinational enterprises while over 90% of all the registered companies employ fewer than 10 people.

To help these small business survive, Telia Finland started giving away their national advertising space in Finland, including ad minutes on national television as well as ad space in big newspapers, social media, and online, which would be beyond the financial means of most of these small businesses. Telia aims to help 100 selected companies each week when the campaign is running, including local restaurants, car repair shops, craftsmen, and others. The campaign started in the last week of March.

“We believe that those who can help, should help. This situation affects us all. As a responsible company we want to do our part to ensure that businesses and people in Finland are able to get through this devastating situation,” said Jari Rapo, Vice President and the Head of Enterprise Business at Telia Finland. “As a big ICT and media corporation we have the possibility to offer our platforms and channels to those in need. Situations like this usually force businesses to cut costs from marketing and this is where we can offer our helping hand.”

Telia is calling on other big enterprises to join them in the endeavour to help save the SMEs in the biggest crisis the country’s economy has seen since the early 1990s, when Finland’s biggest trading partner, the Soviet Union, collapsed.

“We try to help as many companies as possible but we cannot do this alone. We believe that by working together and leading with an example we can help hundreds of small businesses stay afloat,” said Kaisa Pajari, Senior Communications Advisor of Enterprise Business at Telia Finland. “This is why we invite other big companies to join our cause by offering their expertise and platforms to those in need. It is not only Finland where small businesses are affected and we hope our example leads to a global movement. Big companies for example offer their advertising space or digital services.”

Consensus on 6G is gradually forming

Participants at the virtual 6G Wireless Summit shared their thinking on what 6G can do and what research is needed to get the underlying technologies in place.

The 6G Wireless Summit 2020 would have kicked off in Finnish Lapland this morning. Instead, the organisers have moved it online. Except for the lack of face-to-face conversations, the virtual event is a competent substitute. This may not be the first time that speakers needed to record their presentations, considering companies had been already pulling out other events over the recent weeks. By the time the Summit was scheduled to start, most of the keynote speeches and presentations at the technical streams had been made available online.

A year ago, when Team Finland introduced its 6G Flagship programme (then called 6Genesis) at Mobile World Congress 2019, what 6G was about was almost a blank slate. Twelve months and 800 peer-reviewed papers later, the direction of 6G is much clearer and the vision is increasingly shared by industry experts and their academic partners.

Having watched six of the seven keynotes (Huawei’s speech has yet to be made available by the time of writing), we can see a clear convergence between the speakers’ views on both what 6G is expected to do and where research investment should be made to make those expectations come true.

Even their 6G vision taglines could look rather similar. For example, Harish Viswanathan, Head of Radio Systems Research Group at Nokia Bell Labs, believed 6G will “unify the experience across physical, digital and biological worlds”, while Dr. Fang Min, Director of 6G Research & Collaboration in the ZTE’s Wireless Division, saw 6G “integrating the physical and digital world”.

The leading use cases expected for 6G are shared by most speakers. For instance, they all foresaw vastly increased interaction between human and intelligent machine. Both ZTE’s Dr. Fang and Ericsson’s Dr. Mikael Prytz, Head of Research Area Networks, called it “Internet of Senses”. This includes both enhanced brain-computer interaction, and, in the words of Nokia Bell Lab’s Viswanathan, in-body monitoring.

Another key use case referred to by the speakers is what Ericsson’s Prytz called Connected Intelligence, or what ZTE’s Fang called Internet of AI, meaning AI interacting with each other, intelligent machines serving other intelligent machines. Such a scenario will have strong implications on network designs which are now limited by human senses.

With 6G poised to operate on much higher frequency than 5G (for example the FCC granted >95GHz for experimental use), the shorter wavelengths will allow for higher localisation accuracy, possibly down to centimetre level positioning. One outcome of such precision will be full digital representations of the physical world, or “digital twins”, by also fusing data from other sources including network data. Network operators will also be able to generate interconnected and collaborative digital twins, and digital representation of larger objects and their environment. Nokia Bell Lab demonstrated a digital twin of a New Jersey street with drone-captured high-resolution data for wireless network optimisation, for example accurate signal propagation prediction.

These use cases need to be supported by new, advanced underlying technologies that will provide guidelines for research in the discipline in the coming years. New spectrum technologies are highlighted by all speakers as such a domain. This includes both radio technology on the so-called D-Band (140-180GHz) and above, and progress in material sciences. Bell Lab’s Viswanathan pointed out that transceiver design for such radio frequencies will be more sophisticated, and may need to use glass interposers instead of silicon. ZTE also sees “Beyond Silicon” as one of the leading 6G challenge.

Network architecture is another key technology requirement that needs to advance in the run-up to 6G. One such advancement is what Nokia Bell Lab’s Viswanathan sees in the trend of RAN-Core convergence. This is primarily driven by the need to move the core closer to RAN for low latency service as well as to make the RAN more centralised towards the cloud. A related trend highlighted by Viswanathan is the demand for hyper specialised slicing. He believes that network slicing should move from resource reservation in 5G to providing separate software stacks and functions by using different micro-services.

Both ZTE’s Fang and InterDigital’s Alain Abdel-Majid Mourad, Director Engineering R&D, stressed the importance and demand for innovation to meet 6G’s new KPIs. Network security in 6G is also highlighted. While Nokia Bell Lab’s Viswanathan saw in 6G a “sixth sense”, for example using real-time analytics of sensor data by AI, Ericsson’s Prytz believed that the holistic solution of hardware-based security, trusted computing, and secured enclave will form the base of the future computing networks.

When it comes to the timing, the speakers had a consensus that it would be around 2030 when 6G will start commercialisation. ZTE believed 3GPP will start more concrete 6G specification work in R22, which the company expects to see in 2029. See the chart below for ZTE’s detailed prediction for the timeline from 5G to Beyond 5G (B5G) and 6G.

In general, the speakers at the Summit look to have much more in common with their views on what they expect 6G to look like than a year ago, as well as sharing an understanding on what key research areas will be in the years to come. While there is no guarantee these predictions will turn out to be correct, Nokia Bell Lab’s Viswanathan put it best when he said, “We have 10 years to be proved wrong, and now can have fun predicting the future.”

Source: 6G Wireless Summit 2020, ZTE Keynote

Happy New Year, Europe! And let’s learn AI

Finland is offering free AI primer to all EU countries, aiming to provide basic AI literacy to 1% of the Union’s total population by 2021.

As her EU Presidency comes to an end, Finland is offering the 513 million people living in the European Union a parting / Christmas / New Year gift: the Nordic country is making “Elements of AI”, an online introductory course for non-professionals, freely accessible to everyone in the Union’s 28 member states. The target is for 1% of the total population, or about 5 million people, to take the course by 2021.

The course was jointly developed by the University of Helsinki and the technology consultancy Reaktor. It started as a private initiative by the creators, offered for free to anyone interested. The programme was soon integrated in the country’s “national AI strategy”. The initial target of training 1% of the Finnish population was achieved just over six months after the programme started. Created in English, the course content was later made available in Finnish, which helped accelerate the uptake by more people. Later the content was also made available in Swedish (Finland’s second official language) and Estonian (native language of the largest EU immigration community to Finland). So far more than 220,000 people in over 110 countries have taken the course. “Over 40% of our course takers are women (more than doubling the global Computer Science average) and over 25% are over the age of 45” according to Reaktor.

“As our Presidency ends, we want to offer something concrete. It’s about one of the most pressing challenges facing Europe and Finland today: how to develop our digital literacy,” said Timo Harakka, Minister of Employment. Announced in Brussels recently, the content creators, working with EU partners, are going to translate the course into all the other 20 official languages in the EU. The budget of the project, estimated to run up to EUR 1.7 million ($2 million), will be paid for by the Ministry of Economic Affairs and Employment.

“Our investment has three goals: we want to equip EU citizens with digital skills for the future; we wish to increase practical understanding of what artificial intelligence is; and by doing so, we want to give a boost to the digital leadership of Europe,” Harakka said. “The significance of AI is growing. To make use of it, we need digital skills. Changing labour markets, the transformation of work, digitalisation and intensifying global competition all mean one thing for the EU: we must invest in people. Every EU citizen should have the opportunity to pursue continuous lifelong learning, regardless of age and educational background.”

Teemu Roos, Associate Professor in Computer Science at the University of Helsinki, said, “Our University has a policy of making its research and expertise benefit society at large. As research into artificial intelligence is highly advanced in Finland, it came naturally to us to make AI teaching more widely accessible.” Roos came up with the idea of training AI to all in 2017.

Reaktor shares this view. Megan Schaible, COO of Reaktor Education, wrote in a post that new technologies like AI “can feel like an insider’s club that has left the majority of us behind.” The AI for all initiative is therefore developed to “prove that AI should not be left in the hands of only a few elite coders.”

Other EU leaders may see technologies differently. Ina Schieferdecker, a junior minister in Germany’s Federal Ministry of Education and Research, and a PhD in computer science by training, recently expressed a more elitist view that Europeans do not need to understand AI to trust it.

Among University of Helsinki’s alumni is Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux operating system.

 

China joins the race to 6G

Days after 5G was switched on by the three telecom operators in China, the Chinese government officially launched a 6G R&D programme.

Yes, you read it right. 6G is officially on the card. Reported by the Science and Technology Daily today, the official launch meeting was hosted by the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) on 3 November, three days after the country’s three incumbent telecom operators started offering 5G commercial services. The government department oversees the country’s long-term strategy in science and technology, and also owns the newspaper.

Two organisations will be set up to drive 6G R&D in China. The 6G R&D Working Group will be composed of government representatives from different departments, and will be responsible for overall promotion and implementation of R&D in 6G. The Experts Group will include 37 scientists and technology experts from academia, research institutes, and businesses, and will be responsible for setting 6G R&D agenda and conducting technology evaluation, as well as advising on important government policies.

The government officials believed this will be a prescient programme, when 6G technology roadmaps and use scenarios are still far from having an industry-wide consensus. Such an early move will help China assume a driving role to define where the technologies are going. Some industry experts have estimated that 6G will start taking a more concrete shape from around 2030.

China is not the first country to officially start research in 6G. The Finnish government endorsed the “6Genesis” programme already last year. The programme, led by the University of Oulu in northern Finland, will run into 2016. The first 6G Wireless Summit was held in March in Levi, a ski resort in Finnish Lapland, and the world’s first 6G whitepaper, “Key drivers and research challenges for 6G ubiquitous wireless intelligence” was published in September.

Shortly before the Finns came onstage at Mobile World Congress to announce their ambitions and plans, the most high-profile advocate for 6G was President Donald Trump, who tweeted at the beginning of the year that he wanted 6G in the United States as soon as possible.

Xiaomi goes Suomi for camera research

The Chinese smartphone maker Xiaomi has set up in Finland its largest R&D centre outside of China for imaging technologies.

Xiaomi announced today that it has opened an R&D centre in Tampere, west Finland, to focus on smartphone camera technologies, including camera algorithms, machine learning, signal processing, and image and video processing. This will be Xiaomi’s largest Camera R&D team outside of China, the company says.

“The setup of this R&D team in Finnish city Tampere is a milestone in our global expansion journey. In this journey, not only do we consolidate ourselves in operations and business, but also work with local talents to further improve our products with highly innovative technologies,” said Wang Xiang, Senior Vice President of Xiaomi, adding that “this move all the more highlights our longstanding commitment of ‘innovation for everyone’.”

First reported by the website Suomimobiili.fi, Xiaomi’s local business entity, Xiaomi Finland Oy, was incorporated in May, and has rented an office space for around two-dozen employees at the Hermia Technology Park (Hermia-teknologiapuisto), not far from the University of Tampere’s technology campus, which is rated as one of the leading facilities in imaging related research.

Tampere used to be a key R&D centre for Nokia, giving the Finnish phone maker the leadership in camera phones. As Xiaomi’s press releases acknowledged, Tampere “has been greatly contributing to camera and imaging related innovations of leading smartphone brands since the 1990s.” That legacy is not lost. According to an earlier report by the local newspaper, Aamulehit, Nokia entered into a significant patent licensing agreement with Xiaomi two years ago.

Jarno Nikkanen, one of Xiaomi’s first Finnish employees and the Head of Xiaomi Finland R&D, was a Nokia veteran, with a PhD in signal processing from the Tampere University of Technology (now merged with the University of Tampere). He started his current role in June, according to his LinkedIn profile. “Xiaomi’s philosophy has been innovative and highly engaging. It’s all about empowering the teams and individuals to find solutions on their own. What we’re developing in Tampere will end up in the hands of hundreds of millions of users and Mi Fans around the world. That is really motivating,” said Nikkanen in the press release.

Xiaomi was not the first smartphone company to tap into local talents in Finland following the capitulation of Nokia’s phone business. Huawei set up its first R&D centre in Helsinki in 2012, to conduct new technology research for mobile devices, then a new facility in Tampere in 2016, to focus on camera, audio and imaging technologies for consumer electronics.

Nokia gets some Telia love with 5G mall win

Swedish operator group Telia showed it’s not entirely monogamous with Ericsson by picking Nokia to run its new 5G network in the new Mall of Tripla in Helsinki.

While a single shopping centre might not seem like the biggest deal win, it will serve as a case study into all the capacity goodness promised by 5G. Using both Nokia base stations and small cell gear, shoppers at the mall will presumably be able to download the entire internet in one nanosecond and all the other good things promised by 5G enhanced mobile broadband.

“We are seeing increased demand for better connectivity at shopping centers, stadiums and large events, which is why the 5G network rollout at the Mall of Tripla is a milestone for both Nokia and Telia,” said Ari Kynäslahti, Head of Mobile Networks Product Management at Nokia.

I am particularly proud of the way our 5G AirScale Indoor Radio small cells have been able to be discretely installed inside the mall for excellent, seamless indoor coverage. The retail industry has the potential to be one of the big beneficiaries of 5G and we are excited to see how consumers and businesses benefit from this 5G network at the largest shopping center in the Nordics.”

Of course all that lovely bandwidth isn’t just about downloading movies, etc. There is an expectation that retail will be able to use both augmented and virtual reality to enhance the shopping experience in some way. On top of this being a handy case study for Nokia, it will be pleased to be reminded there is still room in Telia’s heart for it after being snubbed in Norway.

Nokia taps Telia for new head of strategy

Finnish network vendor Nokia has decided its strategy should be directed by Gabriela Styf Sjöman, formerly of Swedish operator group Telia.

Sjöman (pictured) will replace long-time Chief Strategy Officer Kathrin Buvac, who isn’t leaving Nokia, but will now focus entirely running Nokia’s enterprise division. This move would appear to signify that the enterprise business group, which was only created at the start of this year, requires Buvac’s undivided attention. Whether or not this is because it’s going well or badly remains to be seen.

It seems like a good idea to have operator expertise in a networking vendor strategy team and Sjöman is presumably up to speed on the techie side too, her most recent role at Telia being at the head of its networks division. Nokia is also making much of the fact that she has lived all over the world, having grown up in Mexico and got an MBA from Durham University in the UK.

“We are delighted to welcome Gabriela to Nokia at a pivotal moment in our 5G journey,” said Nokia CEO Rajeev Suri. “She brings a wealth of international knowledge and a deep understanding of our industry, its customers and technologies. Her insight will be critical in refining our strategy for the future. I also want to thank Kathrin, who has continued to lead our strategy organization in addition to her role as President of Nokia Enterprise since January this year.”

“I am excited to join Nokia at such a pivotal time,” said Sjöman. “With its broad portfolio and innovative technology, Nokia is well positioned to help its customers realize the full potential of 5G, and I look forward to being part of further strengthening Nokia in this 5G journey.”

Back in Sweden Nokia rival Ericsson has unveiled its replacement for Rafiah Ibrahim, who decided to call it a day back in March. Fadi Pharaon is being promoted from his current position as VP of networks and managed services in the Europe and Latin America group. He is an Ericsson lifer who seems to have had executive roles for the company in every part of the world.

“With the introduction of 5G we are at an exciting time in the industry,” said Ericsson CEO Börje Ekholm. “Our customer relationships are key to build a strong company position in the market for this next phase of industry development. Fadi has the right background, experience and capabilities to lead this work in this Market Area and I am very pleased to see him stepping up to this role.”

“The mobile industry is transforming countries and industries and with 5G becoming a reality, we will see new business opportunities and innovations across our markets,” said Pharaon. “I really look forward to taking on this exciting new role in Market Area Middle East & Africa and work together with both the team in the Market Area as well as the Executive Team. Our abilities to work closely with our customers in our market areas are key to leveraging our technology leadership in 5G.”

We can probably expect every significant announcement from either company to be framed in this ‘now that 5G has arrived’ way. The commercial opportunities presented by 5G are far more diverse and complex than by any previous mobile technology generation, so strategy maybe more important than ever when it comes to capitalising on the 5G opportunity.

Telia toys with facial recognition for ice cream payments

In the ever-lasting search for 5G usecases, Telia has teamed-up with Finnish bank OP to trial facial recognition payment solutions.

While facial recognition technologies are taking a bit of a reputational beating at the moment, there are promising usecases in the pipeline. The issue which is not being discussed here, though certainly warrants more attention in the public domain, is the ethical, responsible and transparent application of the technology.

However, this example, authenticating payments, would appear to be a very logical application of the technology.

Firstly, biometrics are becoming increasingly normalised in payments and financial services authentication through fingerprints or vocal recognition, this is just one step further. Secondly, it is theoretically more secure than current identification and authentication techniques. And finally, banks already have trusted relationships with the consumer, and are yet to be caught up with a privacy scandal.

“Facial payment is a good example of a service that benefits from the capacity increase and lower latency of 5G,” said Janne Koistinen, Head of Telia Finland’s 5G programme. “5G will also take the security of mobile connections to the next level, which is interesting for example for payment and other financial services.”

Using the biometric template uploaded through a camera prior to the purchase with the customers bank, a connected device is used by the merchant to authenticate the individual. The customer then authorises the purchase with a simple click once their face has been recognised.

However, 5G would appear to be key here, largely thanks to the advances in lower latency which can be experienced. Slow service could certainly hinder experience and the commercial benefits promised.

“Besides security, a smooth user experience is important for customers,” said Kristian Luoma, Head of OP Lab. “5G makes the service faster and is therefore the perfect partner for Pivo Face Payment. We believe that the trial with Telia opens a new window to the future.”

Although fingerprints and vocal patterns are theoretically unique to each person, there are environmental factors which might hinder authentication. For example, dirt or grease stop the fingerprint reader from worker, or background noise could impact performance for vocal readers.

Facial recognition is also cheaper. Most smartphones or tablets already have a camera, so no specialist equipment needs to be built into the devices. The camera does not need to be high-end, just functional, therefore the expense is mainly on the software side. It is also a lot more accessible, in that everyone has a face and rarely covers it up when in a store.

For the moment, this trial has been limited to an ice-cream van in Vallila, though it is easy to see the wider applications in numerous different settings.

The challenge which such initiatives might face is the increasingly negative perception of facial recognition. This reputation the technology is working up is largely down to the unethical or secretive application in surveillance. This is a much larger topic which needs to be discussed in the public domain, however this initiative does demonstrate the benefits of facial recognition.

Swisscom, SK Telecom, Elisa and BICS claim world’s first 5G roaming services

The very small number of people who are capable and inclined can now roam between the 5G networks of Swisscom and either SK Telecom or Elisa.

Swisscom has over 6 million mobile subscribers but hasn’t revealed how many of them have upgraded to 5G. Since Swisscom only started to roll out its 5G network in April of this year, it seems safe to assume its 5G subscriber base is struggling to hit six figures. Of those, owners of Samsung Galaxy S10 5G smartphones can now fly from Zurich to Seoul confident of maintaining their newly-won boosted download speeds. The converse is true of SK Telecom’s 5G punters.

“SK Telecom once again proved its leadership in advanced roaming technology with the launch of world’s first 5G roaming service” said Han Myung-jin, Head of the MNO Business Supporting Group of SK Telecom. “We will continuously expand our 5G roaming service to enhance customer experience and benefits.”

“We want to offer our customers the best network – both in Switzerland and abroad,” said Dirk Wierzbitzki, Head of Product and Marketing at Swisscom. “So we are proud to be one of the world’s first providers to offer 5G abroad. We will continue to expand 5G availability abroad with additional partners.”

Swisscom has struck up a similar deal with Finnish operator Elisa, which is also claiming the world first, so it looks like SK Telecom has a fight on its hands. We were amongst the first countries to start building 5G networks in Finland,” said Elisa’s Director of Consumer Handset Subscriptions Jan Virkki. “Now that Swisscom has opened their 5G network, we are more than happy to be able to provide the ultrafast 5G to our consumer and corporate customers travelling to Switzerland.”

Roaming specialist BICS also wants a piece of the action, having got involved in the SK Telecom gig. “Today’s successful implementation of a trans-continental 5G data roaming relation further endorses our position at the forefront of global mobility for people, applications and things,” crowed Mikaël Schachne, CMO and VP Mobility & IoT Business at BICS. We couldn’t find any other corporate chest-beating over this bit of news but there probably was some.