Intel brings forward launch of 5G modem in bid to silence doubters

Apple’s decision to go all-in on Intel modems comes with a lot of pressure, so Intel is desperate to convince us it’s up to the task.

A week ago reports appeared to confirm that Apple’s first 5G phones will come in 2020 and will exclusively use Intel modems. Telecoms.com was among the commentators asking whether or not this would turn out to be a rash decision by Apple, with rival Qualcomm expected to be ahead in the 5G modem race.

Intel seems to have taken this scepticism as a personal challenge and has consequently announced it will now be launching it more than half a year sooner than previously thought. The Intel XM 8160 5G modem will now be released into the wild in the second half of 2019, although there’s nothing in the announcement to indicate it will power an iPhone that soon, with the September 2020 models still the likely recipients.

In fact Intel says the earliest you will see it in devices is in the first half of 2020, which does beg the question of whether this ‘bringing forward’ of the launch is purely cosmetic. Could Intel have merely tweaked the definition of ‘launch’ to allow for some kind of meaningless soft-launch six months earlier. Maybe Qualcomm will retaliate with a similar move.

“Intel’s new XMM 8160 5G modem provides the ideal solution to support large volumes for scaling across multiple device categories to coincide with broad 5G deployments” said Cormac Conroy, GM of Intel’s Communication and Devices Group. “We are seeing great demand for the advanced feature set of the XMM 8160, such that we made a strategic decision to pull in the launch of this modem by half a year to deliver a leading 5G solution.”

The fact that the XMM 8160 is ‘multimode’, supporting 5G NR in SA and NSA modes across multiple frequencies, as well as legacy wireless standards is something Intel is keen to flag up. So much so it did a special diagram.

The Intel XMM 8160 5G modem will offer very clear improvements in power, size and scalability in a package that will be smaller than a U.S. penny. It will be released in the second half of 2019, and it will support the new standard for 5G New Radio (NR) standalone (SA) and non-standalone (NSA) modes as well as 4G, 3G and 2G legacy radios in a single chipset. (Credit: Intel Corporation)

Xiaomi the difference: Chinese smart device maker vows to disrupt UK market

Xiaomi launched Mi 8 Pro, the first time it has unveiled new products outside of Greater China, a sign of its ambition to expand in more mature markets.

At a Hollywoodian event (as almost all smartphone launches are nowadays) in Barbican Centre on Thursday, Xiaomi became the latest Chinese smartphone maker to introduce their latest products in London, following recent launches by Huawei and OnePlus. The company unveiled Mi 8 Pro, an upgrade version of its Mi 8 model launched earlier in China.

After registering impressive growth in India and other markets in Asia, as well as consolidating its position in China, Xiaomi, like some other Chinese brands, is eyeing the mature markets for new growth. Western Europe is an attractive option as the market is not flooded with hundreds of smartphone brands as in India and China, and there is a sizeable open market that is easier for new brands to set a foot in instead of having to crack the carrier market as in the US.

“Today we witness a new chapter in Xiaomi’s global expansion journey, underpinned by our global ambitions. We are thrilled to make great strides by announcing our arrival in the UK,” said Wang Xiang, Senior Vice President of Xiaomi Corporation.” By bringing a range of our amazing products at honest pricing we want to offer more choices and let everyone in the UK enjoy a connected simple life through our innovative technology.”

The newly launched Mi 8Pro and its predecessor share exactly the same hardware and software, powered by Qualcomm’s Snapdragon 845 CPU, 6.21” AMOLED display (yes, need to go to the second decimal digit), 8GB RAM and 128GB onboard memory,12MP+12MP AI dual camera on the back, and 20MP selfie camera, Dual 4G SIM, Dual frequency GPS (to minimise coverage dead zones, like near tall buildings), infra-red facial recognition (to unlock with facial ID in the dark).

On the software side, Xiaomi overlayed a light MIUI skin on top of the latest Android release, plus a couple of its own preloaded apps (browser, messaging, etc.). Presumably the main point is not how many people will use its apps but rather to gather usage data. The Xiaomi executives did stress the number of active MIUI users in the world and in Europe (its products are already being sold in Spain, Italy, and France). It has also preloaded a MS Office suite, one of the first offers Microsoft made to the Android ecosystem back in 2016.

Under the spotlight was its photography technologies including the so-called “4-in-1” super-pixel, that is combining 4 pixels into 1 to take in more light, therefore to capture more details even in low light environment. Also being boasted is the speed the phone focuses (using the so-called Double Pixel Auto Focus, DPAF, technology, demonstrated in a video as faster than both the iPhone XS and the Samsung S9+). Nowadays, no presentation of smartphone cameras is complete without talking AI, and Xiaomi is no exception. The main talking point here was on the analytics capability to separate foreground from background, making post-shot processing easier.

The only genuine upgrade the Mi 8 Pro offers over the Mi 8 looks to be the fingerprint reader. It is at the back of the phone on the Mi 8, but is upgraded to on-screen reader on the Mi 8 Pro.

All the bells and whistles aside, what Xiaomi most wanted is to stand out in two areas: design and price. It is clearly successful in one, maybe less so in the other. Xiaomi claimed to go down the minimalist route for its design, claiming that it was inspired by the exhibits at the Helsinki Design Museum. It even got the director of the museum to go on video to endorse an earlier product. But what it got to show its innovative design on the new product is a transparent back-cover where the upper part of the inside of the phone is visible. But to those of us old enough to remember the 1990s, this is more a retro than inno. Swatch’s Skeleton series, anyone?

Xiaomi Mi 8 Pro_Front resized Xiaomi Mi 8 Pro_back resized

But when it comes to pricing the strategy is much bolder and more likely to succeed. Xiaomi broke through in the device market in China in 2011 by offering smartphones with decent specs at a very affordable price. This strategy has carried them through ups and downs all the way to London. The Mi 8 Pro will be retailed at £499.99. This is vastly lower than other smartphones with comparable hardware specs. Xiaomi is clearly targeted at the so-called “affordable premium” segment.

On the distribution side, Xiaomi started in China exclusively using online distribution channels. There have been followers with mixed success, but at the same Xiaomi is also diversifying to brick-and-mortar retail outlets in markets like India, Malaysia. Xiaomi also aims at a mixed channel strategy in the UK, it opens its own online shopping channel, getting online and offline channel partners (Amazon, Currys, Carphone Warehouse, Argo, John Lewis, etc.) on board, as well as opening its own authorised retailer in southwest London on 18 November. It also tied a partnership with 3UK, though Xiaomi executives would not tell more details of the terms or the packages 3 plans to offer.

Also introduced to the UK market at the event are a smart wristband (Mi Band 3, main feature being its display larger than previous generations) and an electric scooter, to deliver the “ecosystem” story—the executive stressed Xiaomi is more than a smartphone company. On display in the experience area were also smart speakers, set-top boxes, smart kettle, and smart scale.

Our overall feeling is that, the Mi 8 Pro smartphone is decent but not fantastic. However the price point Xiaomi sets it on is disruptive. This strategy has worked for the company in China and other Asian and European market, taking them to commendable market positions and financial success. It may stand a chance.

Xiaomi event pic2

Samsung details its foldable display plans

Tech giant Samsung reckons there might be a market for a foldable phone that turns into a tablet.

Samsung has been banging on about flexible displays for years, but it has always been teased in a vague, utopian way. Just imagine a world in which devices can bend, they invited us to do on an annual basis, without going to far as to actually detail the practical benefits of such a thing. There was even talk of rollable displays that we could unfurl like a high-tech scroll.

But now, finally, all this talk has coalesced into an actual product: the Infinity Flex Display. It was revealed at Samsung’s developer conference in San Francisco, together with a concept smartphone that unfolds into a tablet and a new version of Samsung’s Android user interface called One UI.

“Samsung continues to build on its legacy of category-defining form factor and display innovation that has paved the way for a breakthrough foldable smartphone form factor,” said the supporting announcement. “The Infinity Flex Display together with One UI delivers a new kind of mobile experience allowing users to do things they couldn’t do with an ordinary smartphone.

“Users now have the best of both worlds: a compact smartphone that unfolds to reveal a larger immersive display for multitasking and viewing content. The app experience seamlessly transitions from the smaller display to the larger display as the device unfolds. In addition, users can browse, watch, connect and multitask without losing a beat, simultaneously using three active apps on the larger display.”

Clearly Samsung understands that just enabling novel form factors alone won’t achieve much; it needs to catalyse an ecosystem that develops applications and functions designed to make use of its unique qualities. Merely making use of the greater screen real estate would be unremarkable, but enabling a smooth transition between smartphone and tablet mode while, for example, watching a video might be handy.

A short video of the announcement can be seen in the Samsung tweet below, followed by one from veteran consumer tech hack Vlad Savov, which illustrates some of the challenges Samsung will face in turning its flexible display technology into something people will want. Lastly there’s an infographic from Samsung detailing how great it is at mobile displays, for anyone not already convinced of that.

 

sdc2018_mobile-display-innovation

Apple reportedly plans to use Intel 5G modem in 2020, but will it be any good?

Apple has boxed itself into a corner by going to war with Qualcomm, so a lot rides on the competitiveness of Intel’s 5G modem.

Fast Company has reported that Apple intends to use the Intel 8161 5G modem in its 2020 iPhones as part of its already-known strategy of switching to Intel as its sole provider of modems. This move seems to be largely driven by Apple’s dispute with Qualcomm over how much it charges for its chips.

When large companies declare legal war on each other the dispute usually metastasises as their respective legal teams search for further dirt they can use as leverage in the ongoing negotiations. These things usually conclude in an out-of-court settlement, the terms of which are largely determined by the relative legal strength of the respective positions.

The more likely one party is to win a court case, the stronger its position in the pre-case negotiation, which is why Qualcomm has been so keen to prove that Apple committed industrial espionage in sharing Qualcomm trade secrets with Intel in order to help it produce better modems.

While Qualcomm’s most recent court filing broadly outlines fresh allegations resulting from the discovery process, conversations we had at its recent event in Hong Kong suggested Qualcomm has got hold of emails that prove the alleged passing on of protected intellectual property took place.

If Apple did indeed offer Intel a helping hand, something that Intel denies, then the clear inference is that Intel’s modems were of insufficient quality without cheating. A worst case scenario might be that the 5G modems Apple apparently intends to use would be declared illegal, but even if that doesn’t happen there will be questions over the 5G performance of those iPhones versus phones running Qualcomm modems.

So, assuming this rumour is accurate, a hell of a lot is riding on those first Intel 5G modems. If they’re rubbish then not only will that be a direct competitive win for Qualcomm, but the sales and reputation of the iPhone are likely to suffer too. In its desire to dominate its suppliers Apple is forcing itself to make some technology choices that may be far more costly than any money saved on components.

Smartphone market continues to plunge, with Samsung worst hit

Samsung’s smartphone shipments have declined for the past four quarters and the overall market has followed.

At the same time Huawei continues to go from strength to strength. Annual smartphone shipment growth of 41% allowed Huawei to take second place in the global rankings last quarter and 32% growth this quarter was enough to keep Apple at bay once more. Samsung’s shipments declined by 13% this quarter and if these trends keep up Huawei could grab the top spot before long – a previously unthinkable event.

“Global smartphone shipments tumbled 8 percent annually from 393.1 million units in Q3 2017 to 360.0 million in Q3 2018,” said Linda Sui of analyst firm Strategy Analytics. “The global smartphone market has now declined for four consecutive quarters and is effectively in a recession. The smartphone industry is struggling to come to terms with heavily diminished carrier subsidies, longer replacement rates, inventory buildup in several regions, and a lack of exciting hardware design innovation.”

“Samsung is losing ground to Huawei, Xiaomi and other Chinese rivals in the huge China and India markets,” said Neil Mawston of SA. “Samsung must solve its China and India problems before it is too late. Huawei remains the world’s second largest smartphone vendor with 14 percent share. Huawei has little presence in the valuable North America market, but its Android models are wildly popular in most of the rest of the world, particularly Asia and Europe.”

One interesting twist to the numbers was Apple’s decision to stop reporting shipment numbers from next quarter onwards. Since this is always its strongest quarter you have to wonder what Apple is playing at. “Starting with the December quarter, we will no longer be providing unit sales data for iPhone, iPad and Mac,” said Apple CFO Luca Maestri on the earnings call. “As we have stated many times, our objective is to make great products and services that enrich people’s lives, and to provide an unparalleled customer experience so that our users are highly satisfied, loyal and engaged.

“As we accomplish these objectives, strong financial results follow. As demonstrated by our financial performance in recent years, the number of units sold in any 90-day period is not necessarily representative of the underlying strength of our business. Furthermore, a unit of sale is less relevant for us today than it was in the past, given the breadth of our portfolio and the wider sales price dispersion within any given product line.”

Fair enough but the market will be the judge of how relevant Apple’s unit shipment numbers are. Companies like Strategy Analytics will still publish estimates and journalists will still write about them. Apple was one of the few smartphone vendors that still published its numbers so maybe it has decided, as has LG, to get in line with its competitors on this, with the overall declines in the smartphone market possibly contributing to that decision. But the weak reasoning offered above will leave many unanswered questions in the minds of investors.

Smartphones Q3 2018

How will Xiaomi’s launch into Europe impact the smartphone market?

Telecoms.com periodically invites third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this piece Steve Pappas, VP, Asset Value Recovery Services at HYLA Mobile, examines the likely effect of Xiaomi entering the European smartphone market.

The European smartphone ecosystem has welcomed a new player, Xiaomi, who has made an aggressive play for the market. The Chinese smartphone manufacturer has already gained a good portion of market share too thanks to its portfolio of cheaper devices, which seem to be appealing to price-conscious European consumers. The company’s Senior Vice President, Wang Xiang, has even stated that the operator’s differentiator is its “premium product” without the “premium price”.

Traditionally, consumers have invested in the latest and greatest smartphones as soon as they hit the market. Large players such as Apple and Samsung have brought new models and technologies to the industry each year, and we have seen national newspapers cover the queue of fans waiting outside brick and mortar stores to get their hands on these latest devices.

But today, consumers are holding onto their devices for longer, and in fact, are waiting 2.8 years before considering an upgrade. This trend can be attributed to the rise in device prices over recent years, along with a perceived lack of innovation from consumers.

So, with this in mind, and with Xiaomi now entering the European smartphone market with a more affordable alternative, what will this mean for the industry, its players, and their customers?

A new era for the mobile device market  

Mobile analysts have described Xiaomi’s devices as “looking like an iPhone, performing like an iPhone, but half the price of an iPhone”. In fact, its flagship Mi 8 model released in May has been described as brazenly copying the iPhone X, with similar features such as facial unlock and iOS-like Animojis. And at a much lower price point of £350, Xiaomi will be hoping to draw favourable attention from Apple fans unwilling to pay the £999 price tag of the iPhone X.

According to CCS, more consumers are searching for alternative means to secure a smartphone. More than half are on SIM-only contracts, which have been found to be better value, compared to purchasing a device and SIM separately. CCS’s research also revealed a growing interest from consumers in second-hand and refurbished devices.

For the cost-conscious consumer, it can be difficult to turn a blind eye to a device that can offer close to everything Apple can, without the hefty price tag. It’s entirely possible that we could see some Europeans seduced by the cheaper alternatives offered by Xiaomi, and move themselves away from their decade-long relationship with the likes of Apple.

But is Xiaomi ready to take on the likes of Apple?

Xiaomi appears to be a strong contender, having a 10.57% market share in Asia— not far behind Apple, who has a 13.14% market share. Now with its eyes set on the West, Xiaomi’s market share has grown by over 999% in the first quarter of 2018, as recorded by analyst firm, Canalys.

While Xiaomi is still in the early days of its European expansion, having only recently announced its expansion into Britain in May, is now the time for Apple and other manufacturers to reconsider their current marketing plans? We have recently seen Apple announce a “less-expensive” iPhone in September, the iPhone XR, as well as an even more expensive device the XS MAX. The lower cost device has been priced at £700—but this is still a considerable amount more than a Xiaomi device, which is priced anywhere between £300-£500, depending on the storage size.

But there is method behind Apple’s madness. With the launch of Apple’s latest devices, the manufacturer is able to target a slightly broader audience. First and foremost, with a more affordable device, Apple could tempt the cost-conscious consumer to upgrade to a newer device at a more reasonable cost, that could be made even less-expensive by trading-in an older device.

Secondly, consumers know that Apple is a premium brand; no matter the price, some customers will always be willing to pay the cost for the latest device. And that’s what it comes down to. People are invested in the Apple brand, and there will be some that always will be. What it boils down to is whether consumers are ready to try an unfamiliar brand, even if they know its capabilities and price?

There’s no doubt that consumers are searching for lower cost alternatives to secure the latest mobile device, whether that be through purchasing the device and SIM separately, purchasing a pre-owned device, or using their old device to offset the cost of a new one. The cost-conscious consumer is happy to hold onto their device for longer, and shop around for the best deal on the market in order to make the rising cost of owning a smartphone more affordable. And while Xiaomi’s entry into Europe has the potential to disrupt the status quo of the market, we won’t see dominant players, such as Apple, be overtaken just yet.

Italian watchdog bares its gums in Apple and Samsung planned obsolescence case

Italian regulator AGCM has shown its bite is particularly toothless after fining Apple and Samsung €10 million and €5 million respectively over planned obsolescence.

Following a ten-month investigation for unfair commercial practices, the watchdog found the pair guilty, though after months of barking the bite has proven to be as gummy as a 70 year-old Welwyn Garden City pensioner. For many companies the fines would be considered monstrous, but for these two, it will barely register a blip on the financials.

The statement from the AGCM reads as follows:

“As a result of two complex investigations, the AGCM has ascertained that the companies of the Apple group and of the Samsung group have realized unfair commercial practices in violation of the articles. 20, 21, 22 and 24 of the Consumer Code in relation to the release of some firmware updates of mobile phones that have caused serious malfunctions and significantly reduced performance, thereby accelerating the process of replacing them.”

In Samsung’s case, the watchdog believes the company insisted users who had purchased a Note 4 to install the new Android firmware called Marshmallow, which was designed for the Note 7, but failed to inform of serious malfunctions due to the greater stress on the device.

Apple told the owners of various models of iPhone 6 to install the new iOS 10, which was developed for the iPhone7, without informing the greater energy demands of the new operating system and the possible inconveniences, such as sudden shutdowns. To counter these issues, a new update was released without warning that its installation could reduce the speed of response and functionality of the devices.

In a second investigation of Apple, AGCM found the iLeader did not provide consumers with adequate information about some characteristics of the batteries, such as their average life and deterioration, nor the correct procedures to maintain, verify and replace the batteries to preserve the full functionality of the devices.

Just to put the fines into some perspective, it would take Apple approximately 20 minutes to pay off the €10 million fine, while Samsung would take around 16 minutes to pay off its €5 million penalty.

The issue with these fines is the severity. Apple and Samsung have failed in their responsibilities to their customers, and should be punished. However, these are monstrous companies with unthinkably large bank accounts. Fines should be proportional to the size of the company, otherwise fear will not be instilled.

Fines are supposed to act as a deterrent for any wrong-doing in the future. Considering how minor these penalties are in comparison to the annual turnover of Apple and Samsung, what is to stop them from continuing to edge along the line of right and wrong.

Unfortunately this is the current state of play. Regulators can try to protect the consumer, but until they are given the power to effectively and proportionally punish wrong-doers, nothing will change. This is not the last time Apple and Samsung will be caught doing something wrong, and it’s because they are effectively being allowed to get away with it.

 

New Euro Android charges could be $40 per device

Google announced earlier this week that it was going to start charging Android smartphone makers for its apps but didn’t say how much.

Tech site The Verge, however, reckons it has got hold of some documents that detail the tariffs Google intends to impose on its blameless OEM partners to make sure it doesn’t lose a single euro of profit while it wrestles with the European Commission’s trust busters. According to this ‘confidential fee schedule’ Google could demand as much as $40 per device, it’s alleged.

But these monetary considerations could just end up being bargaining chips in a process through which Google forgoes the cash so long as OEMs play ball by preinstalling all the stuff it wants. In other words Google seems to be saying “We won’t insist our stuff is bundled with Android but we will fine anyone who doesn’t.”

In that context the actual amounts involved seem irrelevant, since Google may well write them off in exchange for docile compliance, but we’ve only done three paragraphs so we might as well have a look at how they will be calculated. Essentially OEMs will have to pay more for larger screens and for exporting to richer countries. So a top-end device into the UK could be stung for $40, while a rubbish phone into Greece might only cost an extra couple of bucks.

Google seems to be somewhat sulkily throwing down the gauntlet to the EC by saying “OK, two can play at that game – if you won’t let us bundle then we’ll punish OEMs. How do you like them apples?” The EC will presumably have a bit of a think about whether this new tactic still represents an abuse of Google’s market dominance and then act accordingly.

Google ups the ante with Europe by charging Android manufacturers for its mobile products

Under pressure to be seen to comply with an EU antitrust ruling, Google has indicated that the only way to do so is to start charging for what was previously given away.

Earlier this year Europe fined Google €4.3 billion for abusing its dominance in the smartphone OS market to force the bundling of its commercial products such as search onto every Android phone. The EC found this practice to be anticompetitive since it made it harder for any other apps to compete and this reduced consumer choice.

Accompanying its inevitable decision to appeal the fine, Google CEO Sundar Pichai insisted that the existence of Android has in fact led to more consumer choice, not less – an assertion proven by all the great Android devices you can buy. Regardless Google was given 90 days to comply with the ruling or face further fines, and we now know the nature of that compliance.

In a blog post Google VP of Platforms and Ecosystems Hiroshi Lockheimer detailed the concessions Google will be making in Europe while the appeals process is underway. In essence Google will now start charging any Android device OEM that ships into the EU for the use of its mobile apps. Furthermore it will charge separately for search and Chrome, since they’re the apps that seemed to upset the EC and, as a consequence, OEMs are free to muck about with Android itself if they want.

The justification given for this move is simple: Google needs to make up for the revenue it will lose by not being able to bundle its mobile apps with Android. “Since the pre-installation of Google Search and Chrome together with our other apps helped us fund the development and free distribution of Android, we will introduce a new paid licensing agreement for smartphones and tablets shipped into the EEA. Android will remain free and open source,” said the blog.

An underlying strategy, however, may be to illustrate Google’s point about all the benefits consumers have derived from Android. By charging what it previously gave away for ‘free’ (while making loads of money via the traffic through its mobile apps, of course), Google is saying that the consequence of the EU’s ruling will be for everything to become more expensive.

This is ultimately a fight over Google’s underlying business model of given stuff away and then monetising its users. But the EC does have a point the use of a dominant position to stifle competition via forced bundling and, as the former head of Internet Explorer and Windows at Microsoft notes in the tweet below, has a strong tradition of challenging this sort of thing.

One final thing to consider against Google’s claim that, if it can’t insist all its other stuff comes bundled with Android, it has to seek direct compensation is the matter of China. Google apps have been unbundled from Android there for some time and Google doesn’t seem to be getting any compensation there. If it can do that in China, why can’t it do it elsewhere?

Huawei’s search for smartphone differentiation yields rewards

The smartphone market is a very difficult one in which to create any form of differentiation, but Huawei has done a pretty good job with the launch of its new Mate 20 series.

While Samsung and Apple are now leaning towards brand identity and story-telling to attract new customers, a strategy the iLeader is a master of, Huawei is continuing to search for differentiation on the product side. The launch was glitzy, packed to the rafters and full of new features, some of which were genuinely appealing.

“Smartphones are an important entrance to the digital world,” said Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei’s Consumer business group. “The Huawei Mate 20 series is designed to be the best ‘mate’ of consumers, accompanying and empowering them to enjoy a richer, more fulfilled life with their higher intelligence, unparalleled battery lives and powerful camera performance”

Looking at the features, the devices will be powered by Huawei’s AI chip, the Kirin 980, which incorporates the Cortex-A76-based CPU and Mali-G76 GPU. The promise is a smoother and more powerful experience compared to competitors, with Huawei claiming the CPU is up to 58% more efficient, GPU up 178% more efficient, and the NPU 182%. The devices also includes a 4200mAh battery, with Yu promising 11.21 hours of battery life for heavy users, and the ability to recharge the device to 70% within 30 minutes.

On the camera side, this is an area which will form one of the central marketing pillars for the device and was a big deal in the eyes of Yu. With the incorporation of a 16mm Leica Ultra-wide Angle Lens, the team are boasting about superior wide angle shots, but also numerous other advantages including crisp images of objects that are placed as close as 2.5cm from the lens and AI Portrait Colour video mode. This was a massive deal during the launch so expect photography to feature very heavily in marketing efforts over the coming months.

Audience

While this all sounds promising, this is nothing new compared to the devices of yesteryear, just an upgrade. We’re going to focus on two features which are genuinely interesting.

Looking at the battery, not only will the device introduce wireless charging to the Mate series, Yu introduced the concept of reverse charging. For those who have nervously looked at their devices lurking at 5%, while carefree others prance around north of 80% battery, this could be a very useful feature. Mate 20 devices will be able to act as an energy pack for devices which also support reverse charging. For the moment, we suspect there will be a very small number of compatible devices, but it is a very useful feature.

With the screen reaching the limits of how big it can be, performance speeds only incrementally improving and the camera on every device being top of the range, the battery is an aspect of the phone which could lead to future differentiation. Little progress has been made to improve the battery in recent years, at least little in comparison to other aspects, but the reverse charging feature is certainly a good start.

The second feature which caught our attention was the introduction of EMUI 9, a smart operating system based on Android P. Should it live up to the promise, EMUI 9 can optimise the performance of the phone to the user, introduces new gesture navigation and also unveils a number of new AI features. Some of these applications are quirky, such as the calorie counter, but the 3D Live Object Modelling is very cool.

Using the devices camera, users can scan an object in the digital world, a soft-toy panda was used during the demo, before a digital avatar is created on the device. The avatar can interact with the physical world and also new users which enter the screen. The video below was produced on-stage during the launch. It is genuine augmented reality, not the charlatan created by Pokémon Go. Once created, the avatar will be available to use in films created by the user.

The only downside to all of these wonderful new features is the price. Starting at €800 and heading north for the more advanced models, this is not a cheap device. The Huawei team has already seen what it competitors can get away with and it appears to be following suit. Despite the small mortgage required to purchase the device, this is a pretty good launch and a device which provides some genuine differentiation.