LG doubles down on games and multi-tasking with new dual-screen

LG first started touting its smarts with a dual screen at Mobile World Congress in February, but at IFA it has launched the LG G8X ThinQ, an updated version of the concept.

Although this is not a product which will be applicable to everyone, its an idea which we like. There aren’t too many updates here, but the fact LG is persisting with this form factor indicates there is appeal to the niche audiences it has been targeting. Perhaps this is the step-change in form factor the industry has been searching for.

“LG Dual Screen is now a proven form factor, highly regarded for its practicality and the world of multitasking possibilities it opens up,” said Brian Kwon, President of LG’s Mobile Communications and Home Entertainment business units. “We’ll continue to expand the LG Dual Screen ecosystem through strategic partnerships and upgrade our innovation in meaningful ways to bring consumers a differentiated user experience.”

The concept is relatively simple. Thanks to a connectable module, the LG device folds open into two, separate and potentially independent screens. One device can be removed from the module, to take phone calls for example, and a smaller screen has been introduced to the outside of the module so users can see messages, battery charge and the time without opening the device, similar to notifications which pop-up when screens are locked nowadays.

This device will have its critics. Some will question the point, the size, weight and bulkiness, and also the price. However, this device has not been designed for those naysayers. Instead, it has been produced with multi-taskers and gamers in mind. And we like it.

The mobile space has been crying out for something new for years. Some might suggest one of the reasons smartphone shipments have been slowing recently is down to a lack of innovation. Manufacturers are asking for more money off cash-strapped consumers without offering anything new to shout and scream about.

Each time the launch of a new flagship device approaches, there seems to be more of a focus on creating a sense of brand. This is of course a reasonable approach to marketing and engagement, though it might also be explained by the fact there are no new features to shout and scream about. At the launch events, it becomes tedious to listen to executives plug incremental gains on cameras, battery or screen size; it’s boring.

Like the foldable phone, this is genuine innovation. It is a slightly different twist on the foldable devices, but it perhaps does address some of the issues which the manufacturers have been facing.

If there are problems with the joint in foldable devices, the separation of screens will address this. If it is too bulky, you can pop-out one of the screens in the LG device to take phone calls. It also has independent screens.

This is a genuine USP will creates a talking point and will appeal to a niche audience. Those who like to watch content on their commute to work while also answering emails. Multi-taskers are a niche, but they are becoming increasingly more common, just have a look at how many people are on their phone while watching TV. It also puts a new twist on gaming, with developers now able to separate the control and gameplay functions onto two separate screens.

And it couldn’t have been launched at a better time.

Huawei has recently unveiled the details of its new flagship device, and it will be functioning without any of the Google applications and services. There will be numerous smartphone users around the world who will turn their back on Huawei now, customers without a cause. This void will create opportunities for the Android smartphone manufacturers. Huawei’s loss is of course a gain for rivals.

This is an interesting device, and while it will not be for everyone, perhaps the days of mass market innovation to drive new appeal are over.

DT inches towards the 5G dream

The German telecommunications industry is doing everything it can to dispel the stereotype of German efficiency, but Deutsche Telekom is making progress in the 5G world.

When it comes to the connectivity rankings, the Germans do not generally feature towards the top. This is evident in both mobile, with 4G coverage, and broadband. However, at IFA the management team has been pitching its progress, and in fairness, DT has beaten the majority of telcos to the 5G punch.

5G is now live in Germany, with six cities welcoming the connectivity euphoria. A total of 129 5G antennae are now transmitting the super-speed connectivity, though plans are to have 20 cities on the coverage map by the end of 2020. DT is not moving as quickly as some European rivals, the UK telcos for example, though it is progress.

Berlin’s Mitte district is the largest coherent 5G coverage area in Germany, at around six square kilometres, with 66 5G base stations. Currently, work is being done to increase the coverage footprint in five cities, with single, clustered locations being targeted. It does appear to be a slowly, surely approach to 5G, but few will argue with progress.

However, you have to measure this progress against European counterparts. In the UK, three of the four MNOs have launched 5G services. EE, the first to launch, has promised 15 cities by the end of 2019, claiming to add 100 5G base stations to its network each month. In France, although 5G has not launched, Orange is suggesting it now has 352 5G pilot sites around the country. In Spain, Vodafone launched its 5G services in June with base stations in 15 cities across the country.

There are of course pros and cons to the breadth versus depth conversation, but it is always worth placing some context into the situation.

The claim has been made at the IFA conference in Berlin, where DT has also been plugging its broadband ambitions.

“For the first time in many years, we have succeeded in surpassing the range of cable companies with a bandwidth of 50 Mbps,” said Michael Hagspihl, Head of Consumers at Telekom Deutschland.

Broadband is another area where the Germans have been sluggish compared to European averages. According to the FTTH Council Europe, Germany has a fibre penetration rate of 2.3%, considerably behind the leaders such as Spain, Latvia or Sweden, all of which have penetration rates north of 40%. However, progress is being made once again.

DT is claiming its fibre network is the largest in Germany, measuring over 500,000 km in length. It has said more than 30 million households can now access broadband speeds between 50 Mbps and 250 Mbps, with 1.1 million able to purchase connectivity which exceeds 1 Gbps. These numbers are of course houses passed rather than actual connections, but it is a better position than previous years.

Whether the slowly, surely approach is going to be a winning strategy when the awards are handed out in a few years remains to be seen, though Germany is starting to sort out its own house.