Infographic: Is privacy a right or a commodity?

With the digital economy leaning more heavily on user openness and sharing personal information, you have to ask how privacy should be regulated.

On one had you have those who want to protect privacy at all costs. That is perfectly reasonable, but it does make it difficult for certain aspects of the digital economy to work effectively. Most publications, for example, now offer free content to the user but the value exchange is personal information which can be used to create advertising platforms.

In pushing for hardcore privacy protections in regulation and legislation, you have to wonder whether this business model could operate effectively. GDPR has caused all sorts of issues for some organizations, and this is only the tip of privacy reforms.

If you asked the consumer to pay instead of offer information as a value exchange, they might not be too happy. Free has become the norm nowadays. So is regulating to stringently protect privacy the right thing to do when the consumer might be happy to trade privacy for benefits?

We do not know the answer to this question, so we asked Telecoms.com readers for their input.

Privacy Infographic

Are telcos being honest with consumers?

The ‘up to’ metric in broadband advertising has been a point of irritation for a notable number of people for a while now, but the Advertising Standards Authority will soon be doing away with it.

While it is certainly positive to see the ASA actually doing something to protect the consumer in the murky world of broadband advertising, it might be worth considering whether such ‘creative’ advertising practises have impacted brand credibility.

Below we’ve got an infographic, thank you Broadband Genie for the data, which outlines how honest they consumers feel broadband providers have been. If you have any thoughts on whether this has had any notable impact on the telcos credibility, feel free to comment below, or drop me an email on jamie.davies@informa.com to discuss.

Are the telcos being honest

Are the telcos being honest

What do we actually use our smartphones for?

We all see more and more people glued to the blue-screens for an increasing amount of time, but what are they actually doing on there is they aren’t talking to anyone?

Thanks to Adobe, we have a bit of a clearer idea.

Now, the primary use of a smartphone will be to either call someone or send a text. That is a given, although calling seems to becoming an increasingly unpopular way to communicate, so these haven’t been included. But what is clear is that the smartphone is fast becoming the centre of our lives.

In days gone, an A-Z might have been a fixture in everyone’s car, or an Argos catalogue in everyone’s cupboard, but no more. It will surprise no-one, as it is a trend which has been developing for years, but multi-purpose nature of the smartphone is here and now. The infographic at the bottom of the article will reveal what people actually use their smartphone for.

What we might expect to see over the next couple of years is the phone as a means to pay (replacement for debit cards?), this trend has already started, and also a wider influence on banking full-stop. But what next? How about an ignition tool for your car? Or a smart lock for your home which can be used to authenticate identification and allow entry to people? Travel is also heading the digital way, how long before paper tickets or boarding passes are completely eradiated?

Although not included in this infographic, some of the same uses are surprisingly low on PCs. For example, only 43% of people would say they use their laptop for social media, and 37% for games. Perhaps somewhat surprisingly, only 30% has said they would use a tablet for shopping and only 36% to watch online videos. The death of the PC has long been discussed, but is the increasing size of a smartphone making the tablet redundant?

As always, if you have some interesting or surprising statistics which you think would make a useful infographic, feel free to email them to jamie.davies@informa.com.

Smartphone uses

What Brits think of the smart home

The smart home is proving to be one of the most hotly contested areas of the burgeoning technology industry, but how do we actually feel about the idea of a connected home.

One thing we can guarantee is the tide is turning one way, and there’s no going back now. Even if you resist the most obvious technologies in the connected society, just by using a smartphone you are already contributing to it. Whether it is Facebook or Google Maps or Clash of Clans, you have already aided the data economy.

“Smart technology promises to transform our homes by enhancing security, improving energy efficiency and generally making our domestic lives smoother and more efficient,” said MoneySuperMarket’s Dan Plant. “However, many people are understandably anxious that the benefits will be countered by threats, such as hacking and loss of privacy.”

Turns out this is a massive concern of the Brits. 76% are fearful about the concept of the smart home, but it hasn’t stopped the wave growing. Perhaps it is a bit of a compromise. Yes, there are risks, but the benefits seems to outweigh the fears. Whether it is the lazy side of us who are keen for a robot dog walker, or the cash conservationist who is looking for cheaper insurance premiums, there is an argument to twist our arm.

“It’s up to the makers of smart devices and applications to reassure consumers that they are not putting themselves at risk,” said Plant. “And it’s also vital that any cost savings that flow from adopting connected technology, such as reduced pay-outs for burglary claims, are passed on to customers in the form of lower home insurance premiums.”

Smart homes

Infographic: What Brits think of the smart home

The smart home is proving to be one of the most hotly contested areas of the burgeoning technology industry, but how do we actually feel about the idea of a connected home.

One thing we can guarantee is the tide is turning one way, and there’s no going back now. Even if you resist the most obvious technologies in the connected society, just by using a smartphone you are already contributing to it. Whether it is Facebook or Google Maps or Clash of Clans, you have already aided the data economy.

“Smart technology promises to transform our homes by enhancing security, improving energy efficiency and generally making our domestic lives smoother and more efficient,” said MoneySuperMarket’s Dan Plant. “However, many people are understandably anxious that the benefits will be countered by threats, such as hacking and loss of privacy.”

Turns out this is a massive concern of the Brits. 76% are fearful about the concept of the smart home, but it hasn’t stopped the wave growing. Perhaps it is a bit of a compromise. Yes, there are risks, but the benefits seems to outweigh the fears. Whether it is the lazy side of us who are keen for a robot dog walker, or the cash conservationist who is looking for cheaper insurance premiums, there is an argument to twist our arm.

“It’s up to the makers of smart devices and applications to reassure consumers that they are not putting themselves at risk,” said Plant. “And it’s also vital that any cost savings that flow from adopting connected technology, such as reduced pay-outs for burglary claims, are passed on to customers in the form of lower home insurance premiums.”

Smart homes