Uber is much more than a taxi firm

To most people, Uber is just a cheap and convenient way to get home after a few drinks, but the scope of the business is extraordinary.

While the inclusion of Uber at a broadband conference might have raised a few eyebrows, the overview given by Global Head of Connectivity Rahul Vijay demonstrated the creativity, innovation and stubborn drive which has ensured Silicon Valley and its residents are some of the most influential in the world.

First and foremost, no-one should consider Uber as a taxi company anymore, at least not in the traditional sense. The taxi’s might still account for the majority of annual revenues, but the team is expanding into so many different areas it is difficult to sum up the business in a single sentence.

Aside from the taxi business we all know and love, Uber has a commercial business working with the travel teams at large corporations, the food delivery business unit is solidly position in a fast-growing segment, the team also work with insurance companies to make sure patients make it to their hospital appointments and it is also making promising moves into the freight world. In markets in south east Asia, the team has launched a 2G-compatible app and is also applying the same business model to mopeds and scooters. In Croatia, Uber has launched a boat taxi service.

These are the ideas which are up-and-running or currently being live trialled, though the R&D unit is also playing around with some interesting ideas. Autonomous vehicles, flying taxis and drone delivery initiatives are just some of the blue-thinking projects. This is a company where a lot is going on.

The interesting aspect of the autonomous vehicles is not just the technology but the supporting connectivity landscape.

“Without mobility there is no Uber,” Vijay said at Broadband World Forum in Amsterdam.

Some have suggested that Uber will never be profitable until autonomous vehicles are commonplace through the fleet, though it doesn’t seem to be the technology which is worrying Vijay; connectivity is too expensive today.

The test vehicles which are currently purring around the highways of North America transmit as much as 2 TB of data a day. This is not only a monstrous amount of information to store and analyse, but the economics of taking this data from the car to the data centres is not there. Vijay said it is still by far and away cheaper to transmit this data through optical cables than over the air, which is not practical. Until 5G arrives, and is scaled throughout the transportation infrastructure, autonomous vehicles are not a commercially viable concept for Uber.

This also opens the door up to another very useful revenue stream for Uber. With more than 110 million users around the world, 200 new trips are started every second. These vehicles are travelling through cities, countryside’s and down highways. The amount of information on mobile signal strength or the performance of mobile handoff between cell sites is boggling. These are only two areas, but Vijay suggested there could be hordes of valuable information which could be collected by the vehicles as they fulfil the core primary business objective.

For telcos, regulators, governments or cloud companies, this insight could be incredibly valuable. It could inform investment strategies or encourage policy changes. If data is the new oil, Uber is sitting on a very significant reserve.

As it stands, the company brings in a lot of money, but the prospect of profits are questionable. In the three months ending June 30, Uber revenues attributable to bookings stood at $15.756 billion. The loss from these operations was $5.485 billion. The transportation game operates on very fine margins. Share price has declined by 28% since this earnings call, though there is hope on the horizon.

If Uber can gain traction in the new markets it is pushing aggressively into there will be increased revenues, though in monetizing assets which it creates organically, the data collected from taxi trips, there could be some interesting developments.

Ericsson optimism grows after another solid quarter

Swedish networking vendor Ericsson reckons it’s capturing market share after announcing sales growth of 3% in Q3 2019.

Ericsson derives much of its market sizing estimate from analyst firm Dell’Oro and last we heard they were saying the overall market is currently growing at 2%. That does point towards Ericsson increasing its market share and also makes us wonder about Huawei’s 24% growth, unless nearly all of that was down to its smartphone division.

Ericsson Q3 2019 slide 1

As you can see from the first slide above, quarterly profits were more than wiped out by the one-off hit from the US fine for historical dodgy dealings. But that was already priced in and investors seem to be pleased by the sales and margin numbers, as well as an improved outlook on both fronts that you can see in the second slide blow.

Ericsson Q3 2019 slide 4

“We continue to see strong momentum in our business, based on the strategy to increase our investments for technology leadership, including 5G,” said Ericsson CEO Börje Ekholm. “We saw organic sales growth of 3% in the quarter, driven by the early adopters of 5G, in North America and North East Asia.”

Ericsson Q3 2019 slide 2

We spoke to Ericsson’s networks head Fredrik Jejdling about the numbers and he echoed Elkolm’s words about the 5G market ramping earlier than previously expected. However he insisted that the improved sales outlook was more down to Ericsson’s underlying strategy paying off than broader market movement, hence the claimed increased share. China remains the biggest market for 5G gear and Ericsson is doing its best to compete there but it will be tougher than the US.

Ericsson Q3 2019 slide 3

For the longer term enabling operators to compete in the industrial IoT market, which is increasingly viewed as the biggest commercial opportunity created by 5G, is a major strategic priority for Ericsson, according to Jejdling. But he was keen to avoid downplaying the consumer applications of 5G and pointed to South Korea as the best current example of where some of this is becoming reality.

Once more Ericsson has delivered a solid but unspectacular set of results, which seems to be just fine by Ekholm, Jejdling and co. Ericsson’s share price was up 7% at time of writing, which implies investors were pleased by the slightly improved outlook. The networks division remains the driver of the majority of Ericsson’s revenue, but as the industrial IoT market starts to mature, investors will presumably look for a greater contribution from the other divisions as evidence that Ericsson is seizing that opportunity.

Telecoms industry set to reveal its hopes and fears

It’s that time of the year when Telecoms.com once again conducts the signature Annual Industry Survey. Answering it will not only let us know what you think, but will benefit the telecoms industry as a whole, and in turn, yourselves too.

The 2019 Annual Industry Survey (AIS) has just gone live. True to its mission, this survey is designed to take the pulse of the telecoms industry, in particular of those topics most pertinent to operators, suppliers, technology vendors, analysts, consultants, and everyone else with a stake in the telecoms ecosystem. It’s my job to write collate the responses and present them to you.

This year’s survey covers many of the core technology topics the telecoms decision-makers are most interested in reading about, including Industry Landscape, 5G, Digital Transformation, IoT, and BSS/OSS. Undoubtedly the readers of this story, you, are in the best position to tell us, and the industry, how you see the current status of the industry and where you see it heading for. So, please, click here to answer it.

I was thinking about giving this story a title like “Your Industry Needs You”, but that would be too Kitchener-esque, plus I don’t have the beard to go with it. Instead, I’ll go full Churchillian: I have nothing to offer but a high-quality survey report for free, a sense of contribution, and the chance to win a new Apple Watch.

If this is your first experience with our AIS, or if you’re simply interested in finding out how correct (or incorrect) we have been with our understanding and predictions, feel free to check out last year’s results.

Battle for control of connected car ecosystem has not been decided – Renault

It might be slightly unusual to have one of the worlds’ automotive giants presenting at a broadband conference, but despite the odd fit, there were some very interesting points made.

Speaking to Telecoms.com on the side-lines of Broadband World Forum at Amsterdam, Renault’s Chief Sales and Marketing Officers for the services unit Benoit Joly, gave a statement which will come as a tsunami of relief to the telco industry; the battle for control of the connected car ecosystem has not been decided yet.

This has been the worry of many industry analysts and commentators. When a new segment of the digital economy emerges, can the telcos move quick enough to capitalise on the newly created revenues?

A perfect example of this is in the living room. When the idea of the smart home emerged, the telcos got very excited. Here was an opportunity to move beyond the realms of connectivity service provider and into the promised land of digital services provider. However, progress was too slow, and now it looks like the OTTs own this space through their smart speakers.

In this instance, aside from a few rare examples around the world, the telcos have been relegated to commoditised connectivity providers. In the connected car segment, this is not the case, not yet anyway.

As Joly pointed out, there is a space for the telcos in the connected car segment, above and beyond the dreaded utility tag. Renault is of course working closely with the telcos in this fast evolving but still embryonic area, but it is also working alongside the OTTs. Business models are evolving, and services are still being created, this is an exciting area.

The interesting element for the consumer is going to be the seamless nature of the connected car as an element of the wider digital life. The telcos already have skin in the game, as the connectivity provider, however so do the OTTs; the fraternity which owns the customer experience will reap the profits.

From a purely commoditised revenue perspective, there is of course opportunity. Joly highlighted that the car could be seen as an additional element to monetise, though it is not exactly nailed down how. Should connectivity in the car be seen as an extension of existing consumer mobile tariffs or do the telcos wholesale mobile connectivity to the automotive OEMs?

This element of the equation will perhaps depend on who owns the connected car platform and the supporting ecosystem. Should the telcos win out over the OTTs, there will be a lot more influence to dictate the state of play, or perhaps the OEMs would want to wholesale connectivity? The automotive giants do not want their product to be commoditised, therefore this could be a way in which the OEMs add value to customers beyond the point-of-sale of a vehicle.

There are still a lot of moving parts in this fast-evolving segment of the digital economy, and many questions which need to be answered. The OTTs will of course want to own the ecosystem, and the newly created revenues which come with it, however the telcos will be relieved to hear there is still a chance they can move up the value chain in this segment at least.

Three bolsters wholesale ambitions with Pareteum partnership

Three UK has announced a new partnership with Platform-as-a-Service provider Pareteum as it searches for new revenues in the wholesale segment.

The multi-year partnership with Pareteum will see the telco push further into the wholesale world, with the ambition to attract new mobile and IOT services onto the new network. For a company which is almost exclusively known for consumer operations, the growing appetite for connectivity in every aspect and element of today’s society is an attractive prospect to grow revenues.

“We are really excited about the opportunity that this partnership delivers,” said Darren King Head of Wholesale Business Development. “We have significant growth ambition in the IoT and Enterprise Communications markets and Pareteum brings global scale and proven capabilities.”

To provide some context, whole connections currently account for roughly 12% of the traffic which is currently traversing over the Three network. Considering the telco believes capacity on its network could increase by 28X over the coming years, there is an opportunity for Three to bag additional profits.

Across the Three business, there has been a push into new areas. Perhaps the source of these ambitions can be linked back to the connectivity landscape; the smartphone market has exceeded 100% of the UK population and consumers want to see their monthly bills come down, while expecting more from the tariffs. It is becoming increasingly difficult to make money if you are a business which is purely focused on the mobile segment.

While this does not create the most comfortable of pictures for MNOs, the Three management team have set high expectations over the next few years; the business is expected to double in size. This means double the connections on the network, double the number of subscribers, double the annual and double EBITDA.

To meet these expectations enterprise is an area of growth, the UK Broadband team is working hard in the campus network space, fixed-wireless access takes it into the broadband arena, there are already 800,000 subscribers, and King’s efforts here will bolster efforts in the wholesale segment. If Three is to meet the monstrous objectives, all of these ventures will have to be on-point.

And while it is still early days, there is progress being made. There is currently a dedicated team of 40, working alongside other employees in the wider Three business, while numerous partnerships are already in place. In search of growth in the enterprise IOT world, Three Wholesale currently has partnerships in place with the likes of Gamma, ARM, Wireless Logic and AT&T.

However, it is in the consumer MVNO segment which the Pareteum partnership enables. The current relationship with SuperDrug is an excellent example. This is an organization which has ambitions to offer connectivity orientated products to its customers, but it doesn’t have the know-how. Pareteum can provide the platform, Three the network and both can aid with the business.

For Three, the challenge here will be to enter into a market which is already incredibly competitive. It is coming late to the party, though there are certainly some interesting elements to the Three business. The team constantly talks about the advantages of its contiguous spectrum assets and a nationwide footprint of 20 datacentres enable the team to create edge solutions closer to the customer. With low latency soon to become a demand of customers, this could certainly add some muscle to the Three network.

With 5G on the horizon, and the IOT segment continuing to gather steam, connectivity is forcing its way into almost every business model and product design. Three has certainly outlined some bold ambitions, and the only way it can live up to these promises is through the business diversification which is gathering momentum.

Arm unveils the new Autonomous Vehicle Computing Consortium

Embedded chip giant Arm has announced a new industry consortium designed to coordinate industry collaboration over autonomous vehicles.

As well as Arm the AVCC also counts Bosch, Continental, Denso, General Motors, Nvidia, NXP and Toyota among its founding members. Its initial work will involve developing a set of recommendations of a system architecture and a computing platform to promote scalable deployment of automated and autonomous vehicles.

“The future of mobility and the safe, scalable deployment of advanced driver assistance systems to fully autonomous vehicles for mass production requires unprecedented industry collaboration,” said Dipti Vachani, GM of Automotive and IoT Business at Arm.  “The AVCC brings together leaders from across the automotive industry landscape to tackle complex foundational technological and computing challenges to accelerate our path to a truly autonomous future.”

“The massive amount of technological innovation required to power fully self-driving vehicles at scale requires collaboration at an industry level,” said Massimo Osella, AVCC Chairman and lab group manager at General Motors. “We are delighted to join this group of key leaders in the automotive industry. As the AVCC, we are working together to create the ’go to‘ organization for autonomous computing expertise to help bring this technology to market.”

“The AVCC understands the technological complexities and obstacles that need to be overcome for the deployment of autonomous vehicles,” said Satoru Taniguchi, AVCC board member, and Project General Manager at Toyota.  “Toyota aims to work with the other AVCC members to deliver a conceptual computing platform that addresses these challenges.”

Before regulators and general society are prepared to let driverless vehicles share the road with actual people. There clearly needs to be a lot of coordination to ensure things like software interoperability, standardised vehicle-to-vehicle communication and that sort of thing. This consortium seems to have a lot of the right companies involved, but will need to attract many more before it can be considered the default authority on this sort of thing.

France pushes forward with trials of much-hyped mmWave airwaves

Much has been spoken about the promise of mmWave spectrum bands, and France has announced 11 trials to separate the wheat from the chaff in 26 GHz.

Launched by Agnès Pannier-Runacher, France’s Secretary of State to the Minister for the Economy and Finance, and Sébastien Soriano, Chair of the Electronic Communications and Postal Regulatory Authority (Arcep), the trials will sweep the country, covering a handy number of different usecases, while also bringing in an attractive number of different technology companies.

It’s a comprehensive approach few other countries could match-up to. Interestingly enough, several of the projects are being led by enterprise companies, or organizations that do not specialise in telecommunications. To some, it might not sound like the most sensible approach, though it will ensure business demands are priority number one; the problem with telcos is that they specialise in telecommunications and very little else.

The first project will be led by Universcience, at the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie, and will focus on public engagement. The La Cité des sciences et de l’industrie 5G trial platform will showcase use cases to the public, through open events, as well as temporary and permanent exhibitions.

Although many in the general public would claim to have heard of 5G, few will actually understand what it is. Education programmes are critical not only to ensure the public is made aware of progress, but also to encourage the next generation into the STEM subjects. For any nation to capitalise on the opportunities presented by the 5G era, the skills gaps will have to be closed.

The second, at the Vélodrome National, will bring together Nokia, Qualcomm, Airbus and France Television to understand how 5G can aid sports media. Low latency and increased bandwidth will be key topics here, as will the integration of artificial intelligence for operational efficiency and augmented reality to improve consumer experience.

The third trial will pair Bordeaux Métropole, the local authority, with Bouygues Telecom and will aim to capitalise on public lighting networks to deploy new infrastructures.

The Port of Le Havre will lead the fourth trial alongside the Le Havre Seine Métropole urban community, Siemens, EDF and Nokia. This initiative will explore 5G applications in a port and industry-related environments, with use-cases such as operating smart grids and recharging electric vehicles.

At the Nokia Paris-Saclay campus, trials will be conducted in a real-world environment, both indoors and outdoors, thanks to Nokia 5G antennae installed at different heights on the rooftops, and in work areas. This project also includes a start-up incubator programme.

The Paris La Défense planning development agency and its partners have submitted another interesting usecase. With 5G CAPEX budget strained already, the Government department will test the feasibility and viability of owning infrastructure and selling turnkey access to operators. This might erode coverage advantages which some telcos might seek, though in assuming ownership (and the cost) of network deployment, the 5G journey might well be a bit smoother in France.

The seventh trial will pair Bouygues Telecom with France’s national rail company, SNCF, at the Lyon Part-Dieu train station. Tests will focus on consumer applications, such as VR and AR, as well as how transportation companies can make best use of data and connectivity to enhance operations. The eighth trial will also be led by Bouygues Telecom, focusing on industrial IOT in the city of Saint-Priest.

Orange will oversee two trials at part of the wider scheme, with the first taking place in Rennes railway station with SNCF and Nokia. Once again, part of this trial will focus on consumer applications, making waiting a ‘more pleasant experience’, with the rest focusing on industrial applications such as remote maintenance using augmented reality.

The second Orange trial will focus on various 5G use cases in heavily trafficked areas, such as enhanced multimedia experiences for people on the move and cloud gaming. This trial is supposed to be generic, and another opportunity for start-ups to pitch and validate their ideas in a live lab.

“The 26GHz spectrum band will allow us to explore new services based on 5G,” said Mari-Noëlle Jégo-Laveissière, Chief Technology and Innovation Officer of Orange. “We are aiming to set-up experimental platforms that will stimulate collaboration on these new use-cases across all economic sectors.”

With the spectrum licenses live from October 7, the trials are now officially up-and-running. Each of the projects must have a live network operational by January 2021 at the latest and have to make it available to third parties to perform their own 5G trials.

This is perhaps one of the most interesting schemes worldwide not only because of the breadth and depth of the usecases being discussed, but the variety of companies which are being brought into the fray. Although the telco industry does constantly discuss the broadening of the ecosystem, realistically the power resides with a small number of very influential vendors.

This is a complaint which does seem to be attracting more headlines at the moment. If you look at the Telecom Infra Project (TIP) being championed by Facebook, the aim is to commoditise the hardware components in the network, while decoupling them from software. Ultimately, the project is driving towards a more open and accessible ecosystem.

France’s initiative here could have the same impact. By designating enterprise companies and local municipalities as leaders in the projects, instead of the same old telcos and vendors, new ideas and new models have the potential to flourish. This looks like a very positive step forward for the French digital economy.

The many opportunities eSIM promises for IoT

Telecoms.com periodically invites third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this article, Helen Gaden of the MVNOs Series talks us through some of the key findings of a recent report they conducted into eSIM and the opportunities and challenges it presents for IoT.

The Internet of Things (IoT) is opening up entirely new markets for mobile connectivity, and in doing so is reshaping the mobile industry ecosystem almost from scratch. From mobile phones, tablets and a handful of other gadgets mostly focused on consumer markets, demand for mobile services is now coming from dozens of different industry verticals, for hundreds of different purposes – everything from automated smart appliances in our homes to industrial machinery, connected vehicles and self-driving drones to monitoring systems in agriculture, healthcare, utilities and more.

It is a truly massive economic opportunity for the mobile industry and beyond. By 2025, it is predicted that there will be 25.2 billion connected devices in circulation. With all of them relying on mobile networks to stay on line, the mobile industry will be contributing close to $5 trillion in economic value – almost 5% of global GDP.

The catch is how the mobile industry embraces this opportunity and provides for all these new connections across so many new devices. The emergence of 5G, with the massive increases in network capacity and speed it will bring, will certainly help. But that does not resolve another, perhaps more fundamental challenge – how to provision, authenticate and manage network access for the mass deployment of billions of new devices when traditional mobile ecosystems have been based on a one-connection-per-user model.

That’s where eSIM comes in: to many analysts and observers, the switch from a removable SIM card to a user identification module hard-wired into a device has transformational potential for IoT. By 2025, it is estimated that eSIM will be present in two billion devices, with the proportion of total connections expected to rise steadily. But just how far do the opportunities for this virtual technology reach?

According to IoT solutions specialist Arm, eSIM will pay an integral role in revenue success for IoT, the technology they have called the “trillion device opportunity” for the mobile market. Arm predicts that revenues from IoT alone will be worth $10bn by 2025, but insists that embracing eSIM will be integral to that coming to pass.

So, what makes committed eSIM evangelists like Arm put so much faith in the technology when it comes to IoT? The added flexibility eSIM creates in the relationship between device/client and network provider might loosen the grip operators have traditionally enjoyed on network access, but it also opens the door to many more use cases for mobile technology.

For example, the connected car sector has stood out as an early adopter of e-SIM, with predictions that there will be 250 million connected vehicles on the road by 2020, while the total number of connections is expected to increase by a CAGR of 31%. Major manufacturers like General Motors, Jaguar Land Rover, Renault Nissan, Scania, Volvo, BMW and Daimler have all enthusiastically backed eSIM, partly because of the convenience of being able to embed a single, secure connection module in all vehicles ready to be shipped to any market.

But the connected vehicle sector also underlines the value of flexibility in network connectivity for IoT use cases. Connected cars rely on networks to provide a variety of services to vehicle owners, such as infotainment, real-time navigation, pay-as-you-drive insurance and breakdown services, telematics and diagnostics. With critical real-time services like navigation and breakdown provision, there’s a great deal of value in the subscription modules automatically picking up the best available network connection as the vehicle moves from place to place – especially when crossing international borders. This is of particular concern to the logistics and transport sector where fleet management and asset tracking systems need to be effective everywhere the vehicle or shipment goes.

There is also the potential for different services available in a vehicle to use different types of network according to their requirements, all provisioned through the same e-SIM. For example, while infotainment services like video streaming require the kind of high-bandwidth data services offered by 4G LTE, sending diagnostics and telematics data is much less bandwidth-intensive, and use of low-power networks like NB-IoT would be much more efficient and cost effective. The ability of eSIM to store multiple operator profiles at once opens the door to these kind of flexible choices, meaning network services can be matched closely to specific requirements.

The opportunities and advantages of a highly agile, adaptable connectivity ecosystem extend well beyond vehicle and transport industries. In utilities and agriculture, the use of self-driving drones to monitor pipelines, crops and other assets over large geographic areas offers a similar example. Automated drones require guaranteed connectivity wherever they go, with seamless transition between networks as required. Again, simple observational data such as that transmitted from sensors might be most efficiently carried on IoT-specific LPWAN networks, while streamed video would require 4G LTE or, in years to come, 5G. Goldman Sachs sees the value of the self-driving smart drone market as potentially rising to $100bn.

In manufacturing and industrial IoT, e-SIM is seen as a key enabler of so-called predictive maintenance, the use of predictive analytics and AI technologies to anticipate system issues in advance and take action before outages occur. A step beyond proactive maintenance, which seeks to resolve performance issues in the shortest possible time frame using advanced system monitoring, predictive maintenance promises to push availability, efficiency and performance guarantees to new heights.

The prerequisite for predictive maintenance is exceptionally high and consistent levels of data capture, which according to Arm poses a major obstacle. With the sophistication of modern digital processing systems, it often falls to OEMs to provide maintenance for equipment and machinery as an aftercare service. But their issue is that they ‘lose sight’ of their product as soon as it leaves their factory for the client. With e-SIM, data monitoring and analysis can be switched on instantly, providing a full picture throughout the lifecycle of the product, and with no interruptions even if it moves locations. It is this level of continuous performance data streaming that effective predictive maintenance relies on.

So overall, the widespread adoption of e-SIM gives equipment manufacturers opportunities to innovate with the type of devices they can add value to with connectivity and the range of form factors they can give those devices, including shrinking sizes and improving efficiency. It lets them rationalise product ranges with single designs that can be deployed across a wide range of markets, and it allows them to improve service and maintenance SLAs through predictive maintenance.

For operators, more connected devices across more industries opens the door to new markets and potentially enormous increases in their client base. Yes, e-SIM challenges the one device, one network model around which operators have built their traditional business models, loosening ties with customers and introducing more competition. But that in itself should be seen as an incentive to transition to the more service-oriented business models that best suit B2B markets.

Rather than jealously guarding activation to their networks through their own proprietary SIMs, operators should be encouraged to work in partnership with IoT service providers offering their expertise to support flexible, scalable ‘Network-as-a-Service’ platform models that meet the demands of business and enterprise clients.

 

For more insights into the relationship between eSIM and IoT, download the full report: “eSIM: Challenges and Opportunities for IoT.”

Next year is when 5G will start to get really interesting

At a 5G/IoT day in San Diego, mobile chip giant Qualcomm outlined the current state of play with 5G and what we can expect from it in the near future.

As has been well documented, the telecoms industry got its act together a year earlier than was originally anticipated on 5G, thanks in part to using a non-standalone version as a stepping stone. This enabled the enhanced mobile broadband aspect of 5G to be introduced nice and quickly, but more novel features such as ultra-reliable, low-latency and network slicing require the full-fat, standalone version of 5G.

That will be fully standardised with release 16, which is scheduled to be rubber-stamped by the 3GPP in the middle of next year. That will open the door for things like autonomous vehicles, smart factories, mobile VR and all sorts other wireless exotica, which in turn should open up all these exciting new commercial use-cases and revenue streams 5G has long been promising.

We were able to chat to Durga Malladi, who is the 5G GM at Qualcomm, and he was quick to push back on our characterisation of eMBB as the relatively boring side of 5G. His phone was set up with Verizon 5G and he did a live speed test which yielded a download speed of 1.8 Gbps. That’s pretty impressive and, while we’re not sure where the immediate need is for such mobile bandwidth, the tech industry always seems to find a use for it.

Smart factories are something Qualcomm is especially keen to bring attention to as a validating use-case for 5G. Using unlicensed spectrum, a factory could be set up with its own private network, with a guaranteed level of ultra-reliability, that will enable all the machines and people to constantly wirelessly communicate with each other. That in turn could enable new levels of orchestration and efficiency.

A lot of the day involved Qualcomm talking up its own contribution to the progress of 5G, which is fair enough and it wouldn’t be Qualcomm if it didn’t. The company is right in the middle of all this stuff, however, so it does know what it’s talking about, and it used the event to prepare the assembled media and analysts to prepare for a big 5G year next year.