DT and Software AG team up to launch IoT FTW

Deutsche Telekom has partnered with fellow Germans Software AG in a bid to boost both company’s IoT offering.

They’re even calling it ‘IoT made in Germany’ as it combines the Teutonic virtues of DT’s enterprise customer unit T-Systems and its Cloud of Things offering, with Software AG’s Cumulocity IoT platform. The resulting combined forces are expected to expand the empires of this business axis to the rest of Europe, the US and who knows where else.

“We’re delighted to be extending the reach and capabilities of our Cloud of Things IoT platform alongside our partner,” said Adel Al-Saleh, CEO of T-Systems and Board Member of Deutsche Telekom. “Software AG’s technology is critical in enabling us to scale an already successful service and introduce new functionality, giving us the confidence to move into new sectors. Our strategic partnership will help us continue to drive innovation and provide the best possible platform and services for clients, both from the enterprise sector and Germany’s world-leading Mittelstand.”

“This is a new way of partnering and co-operating to offer complete IoT solutions for the real-time economy,” said Sanjay Brahmawar, CEO Software AG. “With Deutsche Telekom as our strategic partner, we will offer the most competitive platform. Customers can simplify their IoT and integration needs with self-service analytics and gain insights to accelerate their businesses for the fully connected future. We look forward to scaling this partnership and making it a global success.”

You can see the two of them chatting about their grand plan while sitting on a small sofa, under a tree, by a river, in the video below. As is so often the case with these kinds of corporate partnerships it’s all about scale, synergies, TAM and that sort of thing. It always looks great on PowerPoint but the practicalities of getting two separate organizations to collaborate constructively often lead to disappointing outcomes.

 

China responsible for one in seven attacks on UK business – report

Cybersecurity attacks directed towards businesses in the UK are on the up and it appears the source of these nefarious activities can be quite often traced back to China.

After years of being ignored or swept aside for another day, security professionals are finally being taken seriously in the world of IT. It might be considerably overdue, but it is at a very apt time; according to research from enterprise ISP Beaming, the number of cybersecurity attacks directed towards UK businesses increased by 179% year-on-year for the second quarter of 2019.

“The rate at which UK businesses are attacked online has soared over the last year and companies large and small are under sustained attack from hackers around the world,” said Sonia Blizzard, MD of Beaming.

“The majority of cyber-attacks on businesses are indiscriminate, malicious code that trawls the web seeking to exploit any weak point in cyber security systems. A single breach can be catastrophic to those involved.”

Unfortunately for those who would like international tensions to simmer-down, Beaming is also pointing the finger towards China as the source of many threats. China is seemingly the source of one in seven of these attacks, though Taiwan, Brazil, Egypt and the US are some of most persistent offenders.

Amazingly, on average UK businesses are under-threat from a cyber-criminal every 50 seconds, totalling 146,491 over the period in question. It might sound ridiculous, but it demonstrates the simplistic nature of some of these attacks. For the most part, large businesses will be able to avoid any serious damage by simply investing in basic security principles and systems, though you have to wonder how many SMEs are underprepared to resist the suspect fingers of the dark web.

According to Beaming, 63% of small businesses suffered a cyber-attack last year, with the average cost to the business being £63,000. The total cost of cybercrime for small businesses was £13.6 billion. The under-preparedness of SMEs is perhaps best indicated by its proportion of the total; £13.6 billion of the £17 billion total.

Although there is likely to be a fair bit of fear-mongering from Beaming here, security is considered to be one of the selling points of the business, the threat of cybercrime should not be undervalued.

One trend which presents as much of a threat as it does opportunity is IOT. This is a technology which has the potential to revolutionise business models but also give rise to new services and products. However, the threat is just as prominent. The more a company relies of IOT, the bigger the perimeter of its network and the more points of exposure. The number of gateways increases, increasing complexity of cybersecurity.

For those companies which are struggling to cope in the embryonic version of digital which we live in today, tomorrow could be a disaster.

The research has been released at a very intelligent time when you consider the number of GDPR fines which are potentially on the horizon. Earlier today, July 8, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) announced its intention to fine British Airways £184 million for a data breach which occurred in September 2018.

This is the biggest fine handed out by the ICO, but it is worth remembering this is only one of the first examples of the watchdog swinging the GDPR stick. The number of ‘contacts’ the ICO has had with businesses, organizations and individuals has increased 66% since GDPR was introduced in May 2018. In terms of workforce, 200 additional employees have been drafted in since GDPR with plans to hire another 100 to take the total north of 800.

These numbers suggest the ICO is getting more serious about investigation and enforcement, though another consideration for the importance of security is the buying preferences of UK consumers.

If the number of complaints about personal data breaches are increasing, up to 14,000 for the 12 months to May 1 from 3,300 in the prior year period, consumers are clearly more aware about security and data protection. With more products incorporating connectivity, and consumers becoming more away of the dangers of the internet, the security credentials of an organization will become a factor in the purchasing decision-making process.

If start-ups are going to challenge the status quo in the digital world, they will need to sort out security systems and processes. It might surprise some that SMEs account for such a large proportion of the cost of cybersecurity to UK businesses, but such statistics will start to become more prominent as digital increasingly becomes the norm.

Theoretically, the digital world levels the playing field, affording the opportunity for start-ups to challenge the status quo, but if they aren’t up-to-speed when it comes to security, it might well turn out to be a non-starter.

Google is now leading the European smart home segment

The smart home is increasingly becoming normalised in the eyes of the consumer, and Google is leading the way in Europe.

According to IDC’s Quarterly Smart Home Device Tracker, the smart home segment is growing healthily though there doesn’t seem to be any one manufacturer dominating the space. Google is holding down the largest market share, thanks to its smart speaker products, though there are gains for a quite a variety of products.

“Google had a stellar quarter and was the clear winner in the first quarter, reaching an important milestone in Europe,” said Antonio Arantes of IDC. “Google continues to expand to new countries and support new native languages at a faster pace than Amazon. This is also contributing to strengthening its position in voice assistant platforms.

“Google Assistant was present in 49.2% of all smart speakers sold in Europe in the first quarter of 2019. Meanwhile, Amazon faced supply issues, with the Amazon Echo Dot being out of stock in some countries for several weeks, leaving space for Google Home products to grow.”

The indirect win for Google is perhaps the most important aspect of this momentum. One-off sales to consumers are all well and good, but another interface with consumers offers recurring revenues through third-party relationships and advertising opportunities. This is more in-line with the traditional business model for Google.

This is far from the end of the story however; smart speakers should still be considered a niche segment though growth is impressive. The smart home market is forecast to reach 107.8 million units in 2019, up 21% year-on-year, before hitting 183.9 million a year in 2023.

Looking at the winners across the smart home segment as a whole, it’s the traditional consumer electronics heavyweights who are winning (aside from the smart speaker segment):

Brand Shipments (in 000’s) Market share
Google 3575 16.8%
Samsung 2853 13.4%
Amazon 2810 13.2%
LG Electronics 2129 10%
Sony 1231 5.8%
Others 8670 40.8%

Looking at the segment growth, home entertainment products are the largest area collecting 55.4%, while smart speakers sit in second place with 21.4%. Lighting, home security and thermostats collectively accounted for 20.8% of the smart home market, with IDC predicting 27.11% CAGR between 2019 and 2023. By 2023, these products could account for an additional 9.5% market share.

Large-scale NB-IoT Electric Bike Management in Zhengzhou Wins the GSMA Best Mobile Innovation for Smart Cities in Asia Award

[Shanghai, China, June 27, 2019] The NB-IoT electric bike management system jointly developed by Zhengzhou Public Security Bureau, China Mobile, Huawei and Tendency have won the GSMA Award for ‘Best Mobile Innovation for Smart Cities in Asia’ at Mobile World Congress (MWC) Shanghai 2019.

Huawei smart city PR 20190701

Ritchie (Honghua) Peng(left), Chief Marketing Officer of Huawei’s Wireless Network, accepting the GSMA Award for Best Mobile Innovation for Smart Cities in Asia from John Hoffman(right), CEO, GSMA Ltd

This award is the second award after the Innovative Mobile Service and Application’ award from GTI. The award lends industry-wide prestige and recognition to China Mobile and Huawei’s constant contributions to NB-IoT ecosystem development, and also indicates that the NB-IoT ecosystem has become increasingly mature and will witness an explosive growth in commercial NB-IoT applications.

China is the world’s largest producer and seller of electric bikes. Electric bikes have become an important means of transportation for consumers in China, which has brought great convenience to the daily life of the people. However, electric bikes create urban management, security and safety problems, which are worsening with the widening adoption. According to statistics, 70% of reported theft, 30% of traffic accidents and 9% of fires were caused by electric bikes in Zhengzhou in 2017. There is a strong appeal for a solution that can provide monitoring and positioning service for massive connections in mobility with easy and fast deployment as well as the capabilities in evolution towards 5G, speeding up 2G/3G network refarming.

To address these problems, Zhengzhou Public Security Bureau has been working with China Mobile, Huawei and Tendency for an innovative management system, which is based on NB-IoT E2E solution. Multiple functions can be enabled by equipping existing electric bikes with NB-IoT communications devices and GPS or BeiDou modules, which include: anti-theft tracking, fire warning, power alarms and traffic violation prevention.

The NB-IoT electric bike management system is widely deployed in Zhengzhou of China’s Henan Province, with about 3 million electric bikes connected to the NB-IoT network, with theft and fire protection. NB-IoT electric bikes have become the largest-scale NB-IoT application for a single service in the world and the success of this service created a blueprint for other transportation applications. For operators, the system can reuse LTE network resources to greatly reduce deployment costs, while developing a large number of IoT users, and creating new revenue-generating services in partnership with transportation department and insurance companies. For city management authorities, the system provides a crucial tool to track and defeat theft, reduce the potential fire hazards, and achieve traffic monitoring, and improve urban traffic capacity. For electric bike riders, it provides positioning services that increase the efficiency of riding, increases safety through fire warnings, and provides property security through anti-theft capabilities.

This award not only embodies Large-scale NB-IoT electric bike management in Zhengzhou, but also highlights Huawei NB-IoT end-to-end solution. Huawei will continue to innovate the NB-IoT solution to help operators explore the migration path of IoT services with 2G or 3G and build all business connected LTE networks. At the same time, Huawei will also continue to work closely with partners to promote the NB-IoT industry to flourish and create an intelligent world.

MWC 19 Shanghai runs from June 26 to June 28 in Shanghai, China. Huawei showcases its products and solutions at booth E10 and E70 in Hall N1 and ICA01 in Innovation City Hall N5 in the Shanghai New International Expo Centre. For more information, please visit carrier.huawei.com/en/events/mwcs19

Google’s Sidewalk’s bet is a nightmare for the privacy conscious

If you’re concerned about whether Google is listening to you through your phone or smart speaker, soon enough you’ll have to worry about lampposts having ears, or at least if your live in Toronto.

For those who have not been keeping up-to-date with the Canadian tech scene, Google’s Sidewalk Labs is currently working in partnership with Toronto to demonstrate the vision of tomorrow; the smart city. Plans are still being drawn up, though it looks like two neighbourhoods will be created with a new Google campus bang in the middle.

The Master Innovation and Development Plan (MIDP) hope to create the city of tomorrow and will be governed by Waterfront Toronto, a publicly-funded organization. In a move to seemingly appease the data concerns of Waterfront Toronto, Google has now stated all the systems would be run by analysing data, but Sidewalk Labs will not disclose personal information to third parties without explicit consent and will not sell personal information.

This is the first bit of insight we’ve had on this initiative for a while. Having secured the project in 2017, Sidewalk Labs has been in R&D mode. The team is attempting to prove the business case and the products, though it won’t be long before work is underway. Assuming of course Google is able to duck and weave through the red-tape which is going to be presented over the next 12-18 months.

The most recent development is a series of white papers which are addressing numerous topics from sustainable production plans, mobility, data protection and privacy and the envisioned usecases. If you have a spare few hours, you can find all the documentation here.

Of course, there are plenty of smart city initiatives around the world but what makes this one interesting is that the concept of ‘smart’ is being built from the foundations. This is a greenfield project not brownfield, which is substantially easier. Buildings, street furniture and infrastructure can be built with connectivity in mind.

This is the challenge which other cities are facing, lets take London as an example. Construction on the London Underground system started in 1863, while the London sewage system was plumbed in between 1859 and 1865. The city itself, and the basic layout, was established in 50 AD. Although there are creative solutions to enhance connectivity, most cities were built in the days before most could even conceive of the internet.

The Quayside and Villiers West neighbourhoods will be home to almost 7,000 residents and offer jobs to even more, anchored by the new Google campus. The buildings will offer ‘adaptable’ spaces, including floor plates and sliding walls panels to accelerate renovations and reduce vacancies. It will also be incredibly energy friendly, featuring a thermal energy grid which could heat and cool homes using the natural temperature of the earth.

But onto the areas which most people in the industry will be interested in; the introduction of new technologies and access to data.

High-speed internet connections will be promised to all residents and businesses, intelligent traffic lights and curbs will be deployed to better regulate traffic, smart awnings will be introduced for those into gimmicky technology and the neighbours will be designed to allow for an army of underground delivery robots to function.

Autonomous driving is one technology area which fits perfectly into the greenfield advantage. The complications of creating a landscape for autonomous vehicles in older cities are great, but by building up the regions with connectivity in mind many of these challenges can be averted. Not only can the introduction of self-driving vehicles be accelerated, but ride-sharing (Zipcar) or hailing (Uber) alternatives can be assisted while other options such as e-scooters are more realistic.

Such is the ambition nurtured in the Google business, if there is a crazy idea which can be applied to the smart city concept, Sidewalk Labs have probably factored it into the design and build process.

And now onto the data. This is where the project has drawn criticism as Google does not necessarily have the most glistening record when it comes to data privacy and protection. Small print littered throughout various applications has ensured Google is never too far away from criticism. In fairness, this is a problem which is industry wide, but a cloud of scepticism has been placed over any initiative which has data as the fuel.

The latest announcement from Google/Sidewalk Labs focuses on this very issue. Sidewalk Labs will not sell any personal information, this data will not be used to fuel the advertising mechanisms and it will not disclose this insight to third-parties. Explicit consent would have to be provided in any of these circumstances.

Whether these conditions will be up to the standards defined by Waterfront Toronto remains to be seen. This body has the final say and may choose to set its own standards at a higher or lower level. Anonymity might be called into play as many activists have been pushing. This is not a scenario which Google would want to see.

While expanding into new services might seem like an attractive idea, if this expansion can be coupled with additional access to data to fuel the Google data machine, it is a massive win for the internet giant. Let’s not forget, everything which Google has done to date (perhaps excluding Loon and the failed Fiber business) has paid homage to the advertising mechanisms.

Fi offers it interesting data on customer locations, the smart speakers are simply an extension of the core advertising business through a new user interface and Android allowed Google to place incredibly profitable products as default on billions of phones and devices. If Google can start to access new data sets it can offer new services, engage new customers and create new revenues for investors.

Let’s say it can start collecting data on traffic flow, this could become important insight for traffic management and city planners when it comes to adding or altering bus routes. This data could also be used to reduce energy consumption on street lights or traffic lights; if there is no-one there, do they actually need to be on? It could also help retailers forecast demand for new stores and aid the police with their work.

These ideas might not sound revolutionary or that they would bring in billions, but always remember, Google never does anything for free. This is a company which seems to see ideas before anyone else and can monetize them like few others. If Google is paying this much attention to an idea or project, there must be money to be made and we bet there is quite a bit.

But this is where Google is facing the greatest opposition. Because it is so good at extracting insight and value from data, it is one of the companies which is facing the fiercest criticism. This will be the most notable the further afield Google spreads its wings. It seems the world is content with Google sucking value out of personal data when it comes to search engines or mobile apps, but pavements, lampposts and bus stops might be a step too far for some.

Of course, criticism might disappear when jealousy emerges. The hardcore privacy advocates will never rest, but most simply don’t care that much. Privacy violations will of course cause uproar, but if there is a fair trade-off, most will accept Google’s role. If Google can prove these neighbourhoods not only improve the quality of life, but also offer advantages to entertainment and business (for example), this initiative could prove to be very popular with the general public, governments and businesses.

O2 looks to the stars to fuel CAV connectivity

O2 has launched a new project with the European Space Agency to address the notable strain which will be placed on networks with the introduction of connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs).

While there has been a nod to the potential pitfalls of providing connectivity for CAVs, it hasn’t received a significant amount of attention to date. O2 claims it has done research on the segment, and wide-scale adoption of CAVs could generate up to 4 TB of data an hour. This would certainly place a strain on urban networks, but the usecases don’t end at the city limits; the strain placed on rural networks might be too much of a burden.

Code-named ‘Project Darwin’, O2 and the European Space Agency will work with Spanish satellite operator Hispasat, as well as various universities and vertical start-ups, to create connectivity solutions combining 5G and satellite communications.

“Project Darwin is an important piece of the connected and autonomous vehicle puzzle,” said Derek McManus of O2. “The research taking place at Harwell during the next four years will be vital in the creation of new transport ecosystems for the UK public and the companies that will offer these services.”

“Autonomous vehicles need robust, high-speed mobile data connections to operate effectively,” said Catherine Mealing-Jones, Director of Growth at the UK Space Agency. “Building the technology to link them to telecoms satellites will allow you to take your car wherever you want to go, and not just to areas with a strong mobile signal.”

This is one of the questions which the telco seems very keen to avoid at the moment; what is being done to ensure 5G is not an ecosystem for the privileged? Or at least not for a longer period of time than is necessary.

Having just driven back to London from the South-west, your correspondent can confirm the patchy nature of 4G. Telcos and government will tell you this is an area which is constantly improving, but it isn’t although we were taking countryside backroads. The M4 is one of the most important and busiest arteries of the UK. Maybe we are expecting too much, but the number of times devices dropped off 4G coverage is not encouraging for these future usecases which depend on constant and reliable connectivity.

These are questions which are perhaps being addressed elsewhere but not directly in the UK. How quickly is the network growing? Are network densification strategies advancing as quickly as other nations who are driving towards the 5G promise?

Business Secretary Greg Clark has stated the UK has ambitions to lead in the CAVs segment, but to do this the right connectivity conditions need to be in place. It does not appear the network has been rolled out far or densified enough to meet the demands of this emerging segment, whenever it appears.

Satellite is often seen as the ugly duckling in the connectivity mix. It is often considered as an option for the developing nations, and largely overlooked for those who can afford to build connectivity closer to the ground. However, digital divides exist all around the world, albeit nowhere near as extreme or consequential as regions such as Africa. If there are ‘not spot’s, or even areas of weak/patchy signal, some 5G usecases are undermined. CAVs is one of them.

Attitudes towards satellite connectivity have been shifting over the last 12 months, and it does appear to be increasingly becoming an important ingredient in the connectivity recipe. The UK network is evolving and improving, but it is far from perfect; satellites look an asset which are becoming more of a necessity than back-up.

Xiaomi is meeting Huawei domestic aggression head on

Smartphone manufacturer Xiaomi plans to increase the investment in channel and retail development in the Chinese market by $725 million, to improve its position and to counter the expected aggression from market leader Huawei.

Bloomberg cited its source at Xiaomi that the Chinese smartphone company has decided to invest CNY 5 billion ($725 million) over the next three years to shore up its channel and retail position in China’s contracting smartphone market. This will come on top of its current budget and will be spent on channel expansion, partner incentive, and sales force financing, according to the report.

The decision is also made in anticipation of Huawei’s aggressive channel and retail movements in China in the near future, the source told Bloomberg. Huawei, the smartphone market leader in China admitted recently that its business will suffer from the US sanctions and the severance of business relations by companies like Google. In the consumer segment, which now accounts for more than half of Huawei’s total revenue, the impact will mainly in the overseas market with the disappearance of Google services from its smartphones posing the biggest impediments to consumers’ purchasing decision. This will drive Huawei to further strengthen its grip on the Chinese market, where it is already supplying one out of ten of the smartphones being sold.

Xiaomi has reaped the benefits after investing heavily in the overseas markets in recent years, having broken into the top five in a number of European markets while also well received in growth markets like India. It has the ambition to become the market leader in its home market too, but so far, the company has been vying for the fourth position with Apple, trailing Huawei, OPPO, and Vivo.

Huawei and Xiaomi also adopt different retail strategies. In addition to smartphones, Huawei also sells its full line of consumer products in the retail outlets including PCs, tablets, and other consumer devices.  Xiaomi, on the other hand, has carried the “ecosystem” concept from online, which used to its exclusively channel, to offline retail. In addition to its own branded products, centred around the smartphones, partner products on its IoT ecosystem are also offered in the retail outlets, in line with its strategies.

Industry quietly lobbies against Trump’s anti-globalisation agenda

Slowing down the progress made by Huawei on the global stage might be a win for the White House, but US firms are not seeing the benefits as some are reportedly lobbying against the infamous ban.

In a televised interview this morning, Huawei Founder Ren Zhengfei suggested sales forecasts will be negatively hit by the firms debut onto the US ‘Entity List’, taking two years to get back onto the 2018 trajectory. For the White House, this might be vindication of its aggressive anti-Huawei agenda, but not everyone is happy about how events are unfolding.

According to Reuters, US semiconductor firms are quietly lobbying the US Department of Commerce in an attempt to limit the negative impact of the ban. Let’s no forget that while the White House might seem against globalisation trends right now, the success of these firms is largely based on the idea of free-trade and capitalising on the rapid evolution of international markets.

The issue which these firms face is one of commercial loss and gain. Huawei is one of the industry’s biggest consumers of semiconductor products, with the firm rumoured to spend roughly $20 billion a year on such products. When you look at the impact on some firms, you can see why the semiconductor industry is getting a bit twitchy.

Last week, Broadcom lowered its sales forecast for the year by $2 billion, pointing towards one of its customers being caught up in an international trade-war. Although Broadcom has not explicitly stated how much of the total revenues are attributable to Huawei, firms are only compelled to do so when it is more than 10% of the total, the numbers would suggest it is not far off that percentage.

And Broadcom is not alone on relying on Huawei as a customer. Qorvo depends on Huawei for 11% of its total revenues, while Lumentum has said Huawei accounted for 18% of all shipments during the last quarter. As a result, Lumentum’s sales forecast is now $30-35 million less for the year. Xilinx is another chipmaker which has been impacted by the ban on selling components to Huawei, and there are others as well including Intel and Qualcomm.

As a result, numerous lobbying efforts are reportedly being held behind closed doors to mitigate the impact. This might be exemptions or the creation of loopholes, but the friendly-fire is quite notable in this segment.

What is worth noting is that there are other lobby efforts going on also. Google is rumoured to be in active conversations, suggesting its operating system Android should be exempt from the ban on the grounds of national security. Google is arguing that should it be banned from working with Huawei, it would not be able to provide timely security updates which could make the devices vulnerable to hacking and data breaches.

However, there is a commercial angle to all of these arguments which might gain more traction in the minds of the government puppeteers.

At Google, the firm has a dominant position in the OS market. Huawei’s alternative OS might not be able to dislodge this position, but it does have a significant domestic market to drive user adoption. If a suitable alternative to Android emerges from the Chinese telco flagbearer, it would not be unimaginable to see mass adoption in the Chinese market. Once it has domestic domination, it would not be unusual to see international expansion to the China-friendly nations. This would potentially erode Google’s influence on the world.

In the semiconductor space, the risk is of the emergence of a homegrown Chinese-semiconductor industry.

This is not to say China does not already have a presence in the semiconductor space but forcing Huawei away from the US could be the catalyst the slumbering sector needs. Companies like Shenzhen Fastprint Circuit Technologies and Jiangsu Changjiang Electronics Technologies have been making financial gains in recent months, both in terms of revenues and share price, while Huawei’s HiSilicon has also been ramping up.

The US is dominant in the semiconductor market and will probably continue to be. There is a gap in competence for core technologies in the Chinese segments to eclipse this position, though the risk is erosion of profits. The more competitors there are on the market, the lesser the market share for US firms. This assumption might well be exaggerated when you consider the preference of Chinese firms for a homegrown supply chain.

For the semiconductor industry, this should be seen as a red-flag. The Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) has already suggested the industry is in a bit of a slump at the moment, with sales for April down 14.6% year-on-year. The SIA does have international members, though its biggest role is to represent the interests of US manufacturers. The last thing these firms need right now is more bad news when the market is already dampening.

The result of this friendly-fire is conversations behind closed-doors. The Trump administration is seemingly trying to dilute the influence of China on the rest of the world, though it appears to be having the same impact on some US firms. We’ve said this before, but the result of this trade-war seems to be nothing by a net-loss globally right now; no-one is winning, and it seems to be a matter of damage limitation.

What the White House should be wary of is whether this anti-China agenda is starting to look like a personal vendetta for the President. If there is notable damage to US firms as well as Chinese, the White House must question whether the current strategy is the most effective.

Is ‘Make America Great Again’ is the motto of the White House, it would be useful for the rest of us to understand how much friendly-fire will be tolerated in the quest to destroy the Silk Road.

IOT spending to top $1.1 trillion in 2023 – IDC

IDC has released its Worldwide Semi-annual Internet of Things Spending Guide, which suggests global IOT spend could reach $1.1 trillion in 2023.

The three segments likely to be the biggest contributors to growth are discrete manufacturing, process manufacturing, and transportation, collectively accounting for a third of the total spend worldwide. Operational efficiency seems to be the focus of the manufacturing segments, while freight monitoring is the key for transportation.

“Spending on IoT deployments continues with good momentum and is expected to be $726 billion worldwide this year,” said Carrie MacGillivray of IDC. “While organizations are investing in hardware, software, and services to support their IoT initiatives, their next challenge is finding solutions that help them to manage, process, and analyse the data being generated from all these connected things.”

Of course, while manufacturing and transportation might not be the sexiest part of the IOT world, the consumer segments will see healthy growth also. The smart home and connected vehicle use cases will drive revenues here, with the consumer market expected to become the largest segment post-2023.

For the telcos, an interesting trend to keep an eye on is the increasing spend on IOT services. So far, hardware has dominated the budgets of enterprise customers, which was to be expected, though as the foundations are laid and the business cases are proved, vertical industry IoT platforms and cloud deployments for IoT software are expected to make headway.

“The new Deployment Type segmentation in the IoT Spending Guide draws sharp lines that identify opportunities for software growth via public cloud services,” said Marcus Torchia of IDC. “Segmented at the deepest level, clients can now prioritize strategy planning at the region/country, industry, and use case levels.”

AT&T, KPN, Orange and Swisscom enable LTE-M roaming across their networks

A consortium on European operators has got together with AT&T to activate LTE-M roaming across North America and Europe.

LTE-M is a low power wireless technology that’s not as low-power as NB-IoT and Lora, but is better than nothing and based on existing tech. Thus it’s a handy first step into IoT for applications that don’t have minimal power consumption as a priority, but it’s still not much good unless the LTE-M modules are free to roam globally.

This is a good step in the right direction as now, if you get some kind of IoT package from one of the operators involved, you can now roam to the US, Mexico, France, Holland and Switzerland to your heart’s content. What you will do if your IoT module happens to find itself anywhere else, however, remains a mystery.

“More and more of our enterprise customers require global capabilities as they deploy IoT devices and applications,” said John Wojewoda, AVP, Global Connections Management, AT&T. “These LTE-M roaming agreements help meet that demand and make it easier for businesses around the world to benefit from the power of a globalized IoT.”

“The introduction of LTE-M creates many new possibilities for our partners, customers and prospects,” said Carolien Nijhuis, Director IoT at KPN. “Roaming with LTE-M has been one of the most requested features by our customers in the market. We are very happy we’re now able to fulfill their needs and unlock their international IoT-potential.”

“Enabling access to roaming on LTE-M for our customers is a clear priority for Orange,”” said Didier Lelièvre, Director mobile wholesale & interconnection, Orange. “We’re proud to be among the first operators to deliver such a roaming capability to our IoT customers and more widely to our partners across this market.”

“After offering the first nationwide LTE-M and NB-IoT networks in Switzerland, we are happy to prove our strong position on roaming and be among the first operators that enhance the key technology LTE-M for 2G replacement with international roaming,” said Julian Dömer, Head of IoT at Swisscom.