Jaguar Land Rover takes a rewarding approach to the sharing economy

Jaguar Land Rover is testing out a new rewards scheme that will see drivers rewarded with cryptocurrency for sharing data.

Like many automotive companies around the world, Jaguar Land Rover has seemingly identified the future of the industry lies beyond purchasing a vehicle, and this is certainly an interesting approach. In return for sharing data with Jaguar Land Rover, such as traffic congestion or potholes, drivers will earn cryptocurrency.

“The connected car technologies we are developing will be transformative and truly turn your Jaguar or Land Rover into a third space, in addition to your home or office,” said Russell Vickers, Software Architect at Jaguar Land Rover.

“In the future an autonomous car could drive itself to a charging station, recharge and pay, while its owner could choose to participate in the sharing economy – earning rewards from sharing useful data such as warning other cars of traffic jams.”

Partnering with the IOTA Foundation, to make use of distributed ledger technologies, by sharing relevant driving information with either Jaguar Land Rover or a local authority, cryptocurrency will be deposited into the driver’s smart wallet. These rewards could be used for a variety of different things, such as paying for tolls, parking and electric charging.

The technology is currently being trialled at the new Jaguar Land Rover software engineering base in Shannon, Ireland, forming part of part of Jaguar Land Rover’s Destination Zero strategy which aims to achieve zero emissions, zero accidents and zero congestion. Like many manufacturing companies, Jaguar Land Rover is attempting to carve itself a slice of the increasingly profitable sharing economy.

UK sets wheels in motion for a more secure digital world

The UK Government has announced plans to introduce new security and privacy rules to ready the country for a flood of IOT devices.

The rules, at consultancy stage currently, will create a new standard for security, hopefully protecting consumers from the pitfalls of the unknown when it comes to the connected economy. Like many other aspects of today’s society, much regulation and legislation has been designed for a by-gone era, with many consumers unaware of the dangers of the digital economy. Such redesigns should not only create a relevant rulebook, but force providers and device manufacturers to consider security as more than an afterthought.

“Many consumer products that are connected to the internet are often found to be insecure, putting consumers privacy and security at risk,” said Digital Minister Margot James. “Our Code of Practice was the first step towards making sure that products have security features built in from the design stage and not bolted on as an afterthought.

“These new proposals will help to improve the safety of Internet connected devices and is another milestone in our bid to be a global leader in online safety.”

The ‘Secure by Design’ code of practice addresses the security oversight. Not only will security have to be built into the foundation of products and services, but firms will have to be more engaging with the consumer when it comes to security. It will force some brands and companies to extend the relationship with the consumer beyond the point of purchase, which for many in previous years, had been the end.

As part of the scheme, manufacturers who meet the criteria set forward will be able to include a label on packaging and advertising to help consumers identify products that have basic security features and those that don’t. It will create a much more transparent approach to security, and potentially make security a factor in the buying process. This in turn will ensure companies think of security as more than simply a bolt-on process at the end of product or service design.

“Serious security problems in consumer IoT devices, such as pre-set unchangeable passwords, continue to be discovered and it’s unacceptable that these are not being fixed by manufacturers,” said National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) Technical Director, Dr Ian Levy.

“This innovative labelling scheme is good news for consumers, empowering them to make informed decisions about the technology they are bringing into their homes.”

Although some might see this process as nothing more than a bit more red-tape to navigate, these are the companies which are likely to be under the greatest financial pressure and therefore those who will be more likely to do security a dis-service. Ultimately, this move should be viewed as nothing but a good thing.

With more of our day-to-day lives becoming digital, the dangers of the online world increase. The ‘Secure by Design’ code of practice not only creates more protections for consumers but brings the rule-book into the digital era. In the past we might have complained regulations and legislation are inadequate for today’s world, but progress is being made. Slowly, but surely.

Telenor makes some IoT predictions

The IoT bit of Norwegian operator group Telenor has had a go at predicting the IoT market, with a bit of help from its friends.

Telenor Connexion partnered with telecoms consultant Northstream (which is quite fond of predictions) to come up with five predictions, which probably means it got Northstream to do 99% of the work and then stuck its name at the end of it. For some reason they decided to conflate IoT with digital transformation – perhaps they could only think of three or four IoT ones. Anyway here they are.

  1. Enterprise data will take the lead in data trading

Enterprises will generate loads of IoT data and they’re not as uptight about things like privacy as consumers so they can flog it to whoever they want.

  1. Digital value will be unlocked faster

The work done by IoT trailblazers has lowered the barriers to entry for newcomers, which in turn will result in greater innovation.

  1. Connectivity will be at the centre of digital product innovation

Right now connectivity is still a bit of an afterthought when developing digital products but increasingly it will be factored in right at the start.

  1. Connectivity will push eCommerce even further

Logistics are improved by better connectivity, which in turn improves the service offered by ecommerce companies.

  1. Managed connectivity will be even more important

As industries become ever more dependent on connectivity, the importance of reliability will increase.

As luck would have it Telenor Connexion can help with all this. “Beyond simply connecting products, Telenor Connexion is dedicated to helping our customers identify the business value in connectivity,” said Mats Lundquist, CEO at Telenor Connexion. “This report is part of that commitment, designed to help enterprises find their way in an evolving business landscape.”

“The business landscape is changing rapidly, which means all types of companies need to consider where they fit in to new digital business processes.” said Bengt Nordström, CEO at Northstream. “With this analysis we also want to highlight the challenge for businesses to face digital transformation on their own – and thus the need to build partnerships with other actors in the ecosystem.”

While it predates 5G, IoT is considered one of the major commercial justifications for moving to the next generation of wireless technology. Not only are the enterprise applications of it easier to monetise, they’re also more likely to be genuinely useful than smart plat pots or whatever. But it’s all about the big data at the end of the day.

Telia bags a big NB-IoT gig

Swedish operator Telia is going to connect nearly a million smart meters using narrowband IoT technology.

The deal has been signed with technology services company One Nordic, which is going to connect approximately 900,000 electricity meters for Swedish electricity distributor Ellevio using the low power wireless protocol. This is Telia’s biggest NB-IoT deal to date but the company has been keen on the commercial potential of the technology for a while.

“NB-IoT is opening up a lot of new use cases for us,” said Björn Hansen, Head of IoT at Telia. “It provides deep indoor coverage, which is ideal for connecting utility meters underground or inside buildings. It also lets us deliver economies of scale that weren’t previously possible. We’re really pleased to be able to support One Nordic on this rollout and are excited to be part of the next generation of smart metering solutions for Ellevio”.

“ONE Nordic needed a flexible, future-proof solution that was economically competitive,” said Anders Malmberg, MD of Smart Metering at One Nordic. “When connecting meters across large geographic areas, economic considerations go far beyond the connectivity alone. Telia is able to provide a high performance fully-managed network that support us in our ambition to focus on delivering first-class services to Ellevio.”

“NB-IoT technology gives us broader and deeper coverage, which is ideal for rural and deep indoor locations,” said Johan Svensson Program Manager at Ellevio. “This allows enhanced machine-to-machine communication that fits perfectly with our smart grid development. It will also allow us to develop and deploy a wide range of new IoT devices and services for our customers in the future.”

While Europe is lagging the US and East Asia in many aspects of 5G the Nordics are doing their bit to drag us along. Telia seems to be conflating NB-IoT with 5G, as indicated by its Estonia launch late last year, while Ericsson is doing its best to further develop NB-IoT. In many ways the two technologies are independent of each other but their development and adoption seem to be happening in parallel so maybe this is an area in which Europe can claim some 5G leadership.

Apple capitulates to end war with Qualcomm

Qualcomm and Apple agreed to settle all the ongoing litigations with the iPhone maker paying the chipset maker an undisclosed amount and signing a six-year licensing agreement.

On Monday, Qualcomm and Apple went to court over the allegation that Qualcomm has been abusing its monopoly position to over-charge for its chips. The stakes could have run up to tens of billions of dollars, with the OEMs Foxconn and Pegatron already demanding compensation of $9 billion dating back to 2013. The case at the Southern District Court of California in San Diego was meant to last for five weeks.

On Tuesday, the two companies released a brief statement to announce a settlement. “Qualcomm and Apple today announced an agreement to dismiss all litigation between the two companies worldwide. The settlement includes a payment from Apple to Qualcomm. The companies also have reached a six-year license agreement, effective as of April 1, 2019, including a two-year option to extend, and a multiyear chipset supply agreement.”

This is definitely good news for the two companies especially for Qualcomm, and good for the industry and consumers. Specifically, for Qualcomm it means its business model will remain intact and the company can put an end to a multi-year legal saga; for Apple, in addition to avoiding the punitive $31 billion penalty, this settlement will be able to quicken its steps to launch a 5G iPhone, making up the gap already expanding between itself and the leading pack.

A few hours later, Intel announced that it intends “to exit the 5G smartphone modem business and complete an assessment of the opportunities for 4G and 5G modems in PCs, internet of things devices and other data-centric devices. Intel will also continue to invest in its 5G network infrastructure business. The company will continue to meet current customer commitments for its existing 4G smartphone modem product line, but does not expect to launch 5G modem products in the smartphone space, including those originally planned for launches in 2020.”

It must have been a blow to Intel’s mobile ambition, especially after it announced only late last year that it would bring the launch of its first 5G modem forward by half a year to the second half of this year, an act to prove the doubters wrong. That originally planned 5G modem to be launched in 2020 referred to in the announcement, presumably a second generation, was supposed to power the first 5G iPhone, after Apple all but officially declared that it would enter into an exclusive relationship with Intel.

Putting the two things together it may be reasonable to infer that Apple agreed to settle after it had realised that it does not have other options than coming back to Qualcomm for the supply of 5G modems (assuming Intel had updated Apple about its imminent decision to withdraw from the market).

In addition to leaning in on Intel, Apple has also been reported to be strengthening its in-house modem development capability, ultimately aiming to rid itself of reliance on external suppliers. Based on the terse announcement released together with Qualcomm, it looks Apple does not believe the home-grown modems will be good enough to compete with Qualcomm in the next few years. Huawei is another supplier that has launched its own 5G modem, but it may be safe to estimate that the chance of Apple going for Huawei chips is slim.

In keeping with the normal practice of settlement cases like this, the companies did not disclose the amount Apple will pay. However, Qualcomm updated the SEC shortly after the settlement announcement was made, as the settlement would have material impact on the earnings. The company expected an EPS incremental of about $2 “as product shipments ramp” without giving a specific timespan. As a reference, in the quarter ending 30 December 2018, Qualcomm delivered an EPS of $0.87 on the back of a total revenue of $4.8 billion. Therefore, assuming Qualcomm’s operational efficiency remains largely constant, the payment Apple will make could run into the $10 billion range.

Payment aside, there must be some soul-searching going on inside Apple, including by Tim Cook, the CEO, who came from a supply chain management background: how could Apple have let itself be cornered so badly in the first place? It’s hard to view this as anything other than complete humiliation for Apple, especially when you consider how aggressively it pursued this case.

On top of the millions it will have paid to lawyers Apple’s negotiating position in arriving at this settlement, considering what was widely assumed about its 5G modem situation, must have been very weak. So it’s quite possible Apple has ended up paying considerably more for Qualcomm’s chips than it would have if it had never initiated this war. Having said that, Apple’s share price seems completely unaffected by the news, probably indicating offsetting relief that it’s back in the 5G game. Qualcomm’s share’s however, surged 23% on the news.

O2 goes up a gear in the 5G race

O2 has announced it will switch-on its 5G network at Millbrook Proving Ground in Bedfordshire to fuel the testing of autonomous and connected vehicles.

As part of the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport’s (DCMS) AutoAir project, O2 and consulting engineering firm Atkins join the project to accelerate the development of 5G-enabled intelligent transport systems. The test will be on of O2’s first forays into the 5G world, with the rest of the network set to be turned on across 2019.

“5G will play a key role in how our country develops over the next few years,” said Brendan O’Reilly, O2’s CTO. “If implemented properly, 5G has the potential to drive economic growth, create jobs and enable a new host of technologies – including self-driving vehicles. That’s why we’re delighted to be supporting the trial activity at Millbrook, alongside ambitious partners who share our vision of building a truly Mobile Britain.”

With the UK recently crowned on of the worlds leading authorities on autonomous and connected vehicles in a recent report, a lot depends on the success of these projects to prove the hype. Future of Mobility Minister Jesse Norman has already promised autonomous vehicles will be on UK roads by 2021, so let’s hope this project is a success; no-one wants to see a politician with egg on their face.

“The AutoAir consortium is pleased to welcome O2 and Atkins the 2nd phase of the project”, said Paul Senior, CEO of Dense Air and Chief Strategy Officer of Airspan Networks, one of the founding members of the project.

“O2’s integration and commercialisation of the 5G network at Millbrook to support both public and private mobile use cases is a world first and will be a reference deployment for the UK mobile industry as it moves to support for 5G applications for Industry 4.0, large enterprise and Government.”

Using 2.3 GHz and 3.4 GHz spectrum, the test will aim to accelerate the adoption of connected and self-driving technology in the UK. Part of the test is aimed at improving road safety and helping traffic authorities to monitor and manage traffic flow. It also follows other trials to demonstrate seamless and efficient handoffs between different radio sites.

Earlier this year, McLaren, another partner in the consortium, lend one of its sports cars to the test. Driving around the track at 160 mph, the vehicle was able to receive and send data at 1 Gbps, while also sharing real-time UltraHD 4K video between a network of moving vehicles.

“This project will transform the way we design, maintain and operate on our future networks,” said Lizi Stewart, Managing Director, Transportation at Atkins. “Developing the first 5G neutral network in the UK will allow us to continue our drive for innovation and industry-changing initiatives for the transportation sector.”

While connected vehicles are certainly a prospect on the horizon, autonomous vehicles might be a distant dream. The technology might be progressing, but there is much more to such a revolutionary change in society than simply making a robot work. For O2, this will be of minor concern as the telcos strides towards the 5G finish line.

Brexit threatens UK’s pole position in autonomous vehicle race

The UK might be a world leader in connected and autonomous vehicles, but Brexit could throw out a few roadblocks and speedbumps.

According to a new report produced by Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) and Frost & Sullivan, the UK is one of, if not the, leading nation worldwide in the connected and autonomous vehicles segment. This position has been created through notable private and public investments, four test beds, three highway test sites and more than 80 R&D projects.

The UK also has digital infrastructure which enables the concept of autonomous vehicles, most notably reasonably high average 4G speeds, 77% geographical coverage and the highest percentage of roads which could theoretically be automated by 2030, one in five road miles. These figures are also backed up by friendly policies, most notably the world’s first insurance legislation for autonomous vehicles, which was introduced by Parliament in 2018.

All of these factors combined creates the most attractive market for connected and autonomous vehicle developers, according to the SMMT and Frost & Sullivan, though Brexit could throw all of this into chaos.

“The UK’s potential is clear,” said Mike Hawes, SMMT CEO. “We are ahead of many rival nations but to realise these benefits we must move fast. Brexit has undermined our global reputation for political stability and it continues to devour valuable time and investment. We need the deadlock broken with ‘no deal’ categorically ruled out and a future relationship agreed that reflects the integrated nature of our industry and delivers frictionless trade.”

While many are bored of Brexit now, changing the channel when the news shoots across to the Houses of Parliament, it is at a critical juncture. The decisions which are being made over the next few weeks will not only decide the future success of the UK as an economic power, but also how attractive it is as an investment destination for businesses around the world.

As it stands, a pondering, sluggish and seesawing political system does not encourage any business with policy certainty and consistency. The UK political and economic landscape is the laughing stock of the world and before too long this will hit hard with consequences.

However, the benefits of this industry are clear. The report suggests £62 billion could be added to the UK economy by 2030, if the country can ready itself appropriately. £25 billion could be realised through the value of time where consumers can make more use of the time spent in their vehicles, more efficient journeys lead to greater productivity and labour market flexibility could add £15 billion, while costs in insurance, running costs and parking could save £6 billion. New segments, such as electronics and data services could also contribute £18 billion.

“The UK already has the essential building blocks – forward thinking legislation, advanced technology infrastructure, a highly skilled labour force, and a tech savvy customer base – to spearhead CAV deployment over the next decade,” said Sarwant Singh, Senior Partner and Head of Mobility, Frost & Sullivan.

“However, it will require sustained and coordinated efforts by all key stakeholders, especially the government, to realise the significant annual economic benefits forecast for the UK from CAV deployment by 2030 and drive the vision of safe, convenient and accessible mobility for all.”

Google wins first round in the battle for the living room

Smart speakers were only about developing a new dynamic in the relationship between the OTTs and the consumer, and Walmart’s new ‘Voice Order’ feature is a taste of things to come.

The new initiative from Walmart is perfect for the Google smart speaker ecosystem, as it plays to the strengths of the internet giant. By simply saying ‘Hey Google, talk to Walmart’ consumers will be able to use their voice to build shopping lists with the grocery mammoth, using any device which has the Google Assistant installed on it.

“With the new voice ordering capabilities we’re building across platforms with partners like Google, we’re helping customers simply say the word to have Walmart help them shop … literally,” said Tom Ward, SVP of Digital Operations at Walmart US.

Of course, the application will not be perfect to start with, but as with anything intelligence related it can be trained and personalised to each individual. At the beginning, users will have to specify what products to put into the cart, but soon enough the virtual assistant will remember these purchases. Saying ‘milk’ won’t put any brand or product into the cart, but the one you bought last time.

This is the futuristic world Silicon Valley had in mind when it started rolling smart speakers out to the world, and we imagine it won’t be too long before the innovation starts catching on.

Although some might suggest Google and Amazon have ambitions to disrupt the audio industry with the launch of their own smart speakers, this was most likely a ploy to drive user acceptance and demonstrate to the mainstream brands there is consumer appetite. If you actually look at the products which Google and Amazon have been championing, they would not compete with the calibre which could be manufactured by the likes of Bose or Bang & Olufsen, but it did start to get consumers using smart speakers.

Google and Amazon are the top-sellers of smart speakers across the world, with Amazon claiming to have now sold more than 100 million products, but the traditional audio giants are starting to release their own products. Sonos is releasing models, so is Samsung. But the traditional audio brands do not have the software smarts to create their own virtual assistants, this is where the likes of Google and Amazon come in.

Sooner or later, smart speakers will be the norm, with the internet giants battling for access to the consumer. A walled garden business model can be created, with the virtual assistant monetizing relationships between the consumer and a third-party. This creates a new dynamic between the consumer and Silicon Valley, offering more opportunities for the internet giants to sell to third-parties, and it looks like Google has won round one in the fight for control of the living room.

Walmart has said other assistants will be available to place orders before too long, but Google was selected as the first partner. This could mean one of two things. Firstly, Google nailed the partnership, commercial elements and technical issues to all for such a feature to be introduced. Then again, it could have paid for the right to be first.

Perhaps it should come as little surprise Google has won the first round here. While Amazon fortunes emerged from hosting an online marketplace and creating a dominant public cloud platform, this sort of feature is true to Google heritage. The Google dominance was created through software, intelligent algorithms and monetizing third-party relationships online. This is nothing more than an extension of this expertise onto a new user interface.

Whichever the case, it is largely irrelevant. Google is now ahead of Amazon when it comes to monetizing the voice user interface. This is a big step forward for the digital economy, and while it might be early days, it does give an indication of the futuristic world we are hurtling towards. With more ‘intelligent’ devices emerging, Google and Amazon could be set to become a lot more powerful and influential.

Microsoft and BMW pair up for IoT Open Manufacturing Platform

Microsoft has partnered up with the BMW Group to launch a new initiative aimed at stimulating growth for IoT in the smart factory segment.

The Open Manufacturing Platform (OMP) will be built on the Microsoft Azure cloud platform, aiming to have four to six partners by the end of the year, to help grow an ecosystem and build future Industry 4.0 solutions. The smart factory segment is promising much with the emergence of 5G, but with every new concept there is scepticism; someone always needs to drag it towards the finish line.

“Microsoft is joining forces with the BMW Group to transform digital production efficiency across the industry,” said Scott Guthrie, EVP of the Microsoft Cloud and AI Group. “Our commitment to building an open community will create new opportunities for collaboration across the entire manufacturing value chain.”

“We have been relying on the cloud since 2016 and are consistently developing new approaches,” said Oliver Zipse, a board member at BMW. “With the Open Manufacturing Platform as the next step, we want to make our solutions available to other companies and jointly leverage potential in order to secure our strong position in the market in the long term.”

BMW is already a significant customer of Microsoft Azure, with over 3,000 machines, robots and autonomous transport systems connected with through the BMW Group IoT platform, which is built on Microsoft Azure cloud.

Openness is one of the key messages here as the pair bemoan data silos and slow productivity created by complex, proprietary systems. The OMP aims to break down these barriers through the creation of an open technology framework and cross-industry community.

For both, the objective of this group is relatively simple. At BMW, the team wants to improve operational efficiencies and reduce costs, partly by taking back control of the supply chain, while Microsoft just wants more people, processes and data on Azure. The more accessible the smart factory is, more companies will become cloud-first, and the more successful the OMP becomes, the more customers Azure gains.

The OMP will provide community members with a reference architecture with open source components based on open industrial standards and an open data model. Through openness, the pair claim data models will be standardised to enable more data analytics and machine learning scenarios and usecases. For Microsoft and the manufacturers, its great news, for the suppliers not so much.

Openness sounds like a great idea, but with any fundamental change comes consequence. There will be numerous companies who benefit considerably from proprietary technologies and processes, especially in traditional industries like manufacturing, though those who resist change will be the losers in the long-run. The world is evolving to a new dynamic, where openness rules the roost, resistance only means future redundancy.

Intel VC arm plugs its disruptive vision

Intel has seemingly learned a lesson from the woes of stumbling giants, announcing it has invested $117 million in ‘disruptive’ start-ups at its annual VC conference.

There is a very good reason investors are so keen to pump cash into the likes of Google and Amazon, despite recent criticism and the threat of regulatory reform; these are companies which never sit still. The likes of Jeff Bezos and Sundar Pichai are constantly pushing the boundaries, expanding the business into new segments. It should be viewed as a lesson for every CEO around the world.

However, this is seemingly a lesson which has only recently been added to the management curriculum. In generations gone, some of the worlds’ leading technology companies have climbed further than any other before, and then stopped exploring. IBM, Oracle and Microsoft are three examples of companies which sat still for years, and the industry moved on without them. They have since recovered, but it took a lot to bridge the chasm.

“Intel Capital is continuing that legacy of disruption with these investments,” said Wendell Brooks, President of the VC arm, Intel Capital.

“These companies are shifting the way we think about artificial intelligence, communications, manufacturing and health care – areas that will become increasingly essential in coming years as the linchpins of a smarter, more connected society.”

One of the oldest phrases in the technology industry is often forgotten, but it seems Intel is attempting to resurrect it; disrupt or be disrupted.

Google and Amazon are the perfect embodiment of this statement. If you look at the acquisitions made over the years, they are incredibly intelligent bets. Google bought YouTube, Android and DeepMind for huge sums at the time, but now they look like bargains. Amazon didn’t make a profit for years, instead re-investing and now has AWS as a profit machine. These companies could have collected profits, paid more dividends and rewarded management with more bonus’, but look at what the end result is.

As it stands, Intel is in a relatively healthy position. Looking at the financials for 2018, revenue was $17.1 billion for the fourth quarter and $62.8 billion for the 12 months. These figures are 8% and 9% up year-on-year respectively, with data-centric revenue up 21% compared to Q4 in 2016. Share price declined on the news, investors were concerned over a conservative forecast, but the warning shot has seemingly been heeded.

If growth is not satisfying investors, something needs to change. The status quo is unlikely to reap more rewards tomorrow than today, therefore investment is required. Some of this will be directed inwards, though through the investments in Intel Capital the firm is welcoming disruption; it wants to be in on the ground floor of these potential booming enterprises.

“Our continued goal is to leverage the global resources and expertise of the world’s greatest engineering company, and its ecosystem of customers and partners, to help these founders accelerate growth and innovation,” said Brooks.

Looking at the investments, AI features heavily. Cloudpick is a smart retail technology provider with proprietary computer vision, deep learning, sensor fusion and edge computing technologies to enable cashier-free stores. SambaNova Systems is building an advanced systems platform to run AI applications. Zhuhai EEasy Technology is an AI system-on-chip (SoC) design house and total solution provider.

The team is also investing in the edge computing hype with Pixeom, mobile content streaming with Polystream, digital healthcare with Medical Informatics and Reveal Biosciences and also smart manufacturing.

The lessons of sitting still are incredibly obvious. Oracle founder CEO Larry Ellison dismissed the cloud and look where that has landed the firm. IBM refused to respond to the evolving PC market and it resulted in a colossal overhaul. Microsoft was another which ignored market trends, with former CEO Steve Balmer making some very off-target predictions in 2006. All of these companies have learned a lesson on disruption, but it came at a cost which took years to fix.

With its VC arm, Intel is promising to invest $300 to $500 million a year in disruptive technologies. It is taking a page out of the Amazon and Google playbook; if you want to remain on top, you can never sit still.