Bouygues Telecom continues tower outsourcing mission with new JV

A new joint venture between Phoenix Tower International and Bouygues Telecom has been announced to develop approximately 4,000 new towers across France to its 5G prospects.

The deal will see the creation of a new company, controlled by Phoenix, will help Bouygues Telecom not only meet regulatory obligations for mobile coverage, but perhaps also accelerate a challenge to the market leaders in France.

“This agreement allows Bouygues Telecom to sustain its efforts in sites deployment in Less Dense Areas and also to meet the New Deal requirements,” said Jean Paul Arzel, Head of Network Division at Bouygues Telecom. “It will also contribute to considerably strengthen our Mobile network coverage in rural areas.”

Thanks to the deployment of 5G infrastructure, telcos are under financial strain to meet expectations and remain competitive, though regulatory obligations for 4G coverage in the rural environments are also placing stress on the spreadsheets.

In 2018, French regulator ARCEP announced new obligations for the spectrum licence-holders to improve mobile coverage across all regions in the country. Some of the obligations included forcing each operator deploying at least 5,000 new cell sites across the country, some of which will be shared infrastructure, as well as ubiquitous 4G coverage for the population and on transport networks.

As France is a large nation with very low population density in some regions, this could prove financially to be a difficult standard to meet, though joint ventures with tower companies is one way to achieve such objectives. It might mean that the telcos are ‘tenants’ on the infrastructure for the long-term, but it does levitate some of the financial pressures in the short-term.

Alongside this agreement with Phoenix, Bouygues Telecom announced a similar agreement with Cellnex, the Spanish tower company which is aggressively rolling out new infrastructure as well as purchasing assets from a variety of cash-strapped telcos.

As part of this agreement, Cellnex will contribute €1 billion to fund a 31,500km fibre optic network in France to provide mobile backhaul and fixed connectivity services. Bouygues Telecom will act as the anchor-tenant of the network, signing a signing a 30+5-year contract worth €4 billion, which will account for an estimated 80% of the joint ventures total revenues. Cellnex is free to offer services to other competitors, but Bouygues Telecom is the priority.

Although these agreements will benefit Bouygues Telecom in the short-term, it is handing over more control of its network to external parties. Bouygues Telecom still owns the active equipment, the 4G and 5G radios, though in not having complete ownership of its passive network, the towers and backhaul, it might have to compromise on some decision making.

For example, one proposed site might be excellent for Bouygues Telecom’s network needs, but as the tower companies will be thinking of other customers also, some compromises might have to be made. Bouygues Telecom will act as the anchor customer on these sites, so its demands will certainly be listened to, but as the tower companies have the controlling stakes in the joint ventures, Bouygues Telecom might not get its own way all the time.

This new set-up is of course a compromise, but it does have an eye on the bigger picture. A concession today might lead to greater profits tomorrow.

China Mobile reportedly chasing cloud JV with Vodafone Idea and Bharti Airtel

Reports have emerged suggesting China Mobile is attempting to create a joint-venture in the Indian market to capitalise on the growing cloud segment.

Although these are nothing more than rumours for the moment, Live Mint has suggested senior officials from China Mobile have been in separate meetings with both Vodafone Idea and Bharti Airtel to set-up a joint-venture to tackle the cloud market.

“The top executives of China Mobile met senior managements of Bharti Airtel and Vodafone Idea separately in December,” stated an anonymous source. “China Mobile is interested in the Indian market and wants to come as a holding company with either of these two companies or even both.”

China Mobile has been aggressively growing its presence in the Chinese cloud market, though now it appears to be looking overseas for increased opportunities. India will of course look like an interesting opportunity, not only because of the size but the current market dynamics.

It is not overly complicated to understand the potential of India cloud market. As the second-most populous country on the planet, there are plenty of customers, though the drive towards digital has been very aggressive in recent years thanks to the disruption of Reliance Jio, effectively democratising digital. Attention has largely been paid towards the fight for consumer subscriptions, though the cloud market has also been growing.

As it stands, Bharti Airtel has a cloud services unit in ‘Airtel Business’, while it is also expanding its data centre footprint through ‘Nxtra Data’. Vodafone and Idea brought together their business units following the overarching merger between the telco parent companies and have also been working closely with Microsoft in recent months. Finally, Reliance Jio has a cloud business which was launched in August.

But it is the untapped potential which is getting foreign corporations excited. The digital economy is in its embryonic growth stages today, and the right investments could lead to significant gains in the future. Unfortunately for the Indian telcos, the current financial climate is not particularly helpful to speculative investment or aggressive expansion.

The Indian telcos are almost broke. A three-year long pricing war has crippled the spreadsheets, while the spectrum licence fee bill from the Government is eye-wateringly large. The Indian telcos are not in an attractive financial position, but this presents bargain opportunities for foreign investors who have deeper pockets.

China Mobile certainly fits into that category, and this could be a very co-beneficial relationship. China Mobile want to spread its cloud wings abroad through its investment arm, China Mobile Investment Holdings. India has an opportunity and the Indian telcos do not have the cash to capitalise on the potential today. Chinese money would certainly be welcomed to fuel the initial venture into the Indian cloud.

Interestingly enough, this could also have an impact on the geo-political tensions which have dominated the news for months.

The US does not like China, this is somewhat of an understatement, and it has been pressurising the Indian Government to break ties with Chinese infrastructure vendors. The emergence of a joint-venture, partly funded by a state-owned Chinese telco is not likely to have a positive effect on the already strained relationship between the US and India.

IBM and Google reportedly swap morals for cash in Chinese surveillance JV

IBM and Google executives should be bracing for impact as the comet of controversy heads directly towards their offices.

Reports have emerged, via the Intercept, suggesting two of the US’ most influential and powerful technology giants have indirectly been assisting the Chinese Government with its campaign of mass-surveillance and censorship. Both will try to distance themselves from the controversy, but this could have a significant impact on both firms.

The drama here is focused around a joint-venture, the OpenPower Foundation, founded in 2013 by Google and IBM, but features members such as Red Hat, Broadcom, Mellanox, Xilinx and Rackspace. The aim of the open-ecosystem organization is to facilitate and share advances in networking, server, data storage, and processing technology.

To date, the group has been little more than another relatively uninteresting NPO, serving a niche in the industry, though one initiative is causing the stir. The OpenPower Foundation has been working with Xilinx and Chinese firm Semptian to create a new breed of chips capable of enabling computers to process incredible amounts of data. This might not seem extraordinary, though the application is where the issue has been found.

On the surface, Semptian is a relatively ordinary Chinese semiconductor business, but when you look at its most profitable division, iNext, the story becomes a lot more sinister. iNext specialises in selling equipment to the Chinese Government to enable the mass-surveillance and censorship projects which have become so infamous.

It will come as little surprise a Chinese firm is aiding the Government with its nefarious objectives, but a link to IBM and Google, as well as a host of other US firms, will have some twitching with discomfort. We can imagine the only people who are pleased at this news are the politicians who are looking to get their faces on TV by theatrically condemning the whole saga.

Let’s start with what iNext actually does before moving onto the US firms involved in the controversy. iNext works with Chinese Government agencies by providing a product called Aegis. Aegis is an interception and analysis system which has been embedded into various phone and internet networks throughout the country. This is one of the products which enables the Chinese Government to have such a close eye on the activities of its citizens.

Documentation acquired by The Intercept outlines the proposition in more detail.

“Aegis is not only the standard interception system but also the powerful analysis system with early warning and timely action capabilities. Aegis can work with all kinds of networks and 3rd party systems, from recovering, analysing, exploring, warning, early warning, locating to capturing. Aegis provides LEA with an end to end solution described as Deep Insight, Early Warning and Timely Action.”

Although the majority of this statement is corporate fluff, it does provide some insight into the way in which the technology actually works. This is an incredibly powerful surveillance system, which is capable of locating individuals through application usernames, IP addresses or phone numbers, as well as accurately tracking the location of said individuals on a real-time basis.

Perhaps one of the most worrying aspect of this system is the ‘pre-crime’ element. Although the idea of predictive analytics in some societies has been met with controversy and considerable resistance, we suspect the Chinese Government does not have the same reservations.

iNext promises this feature can help prevent crime through the introduction of an early warning system. This raises all sorts of ethical questions, as while the data estimates might be accurate to five nines, can you arrest someone when they haven’t actually committed a crime. This is the sticky position Google and IBM might have found itself in.

OpenPower has said that it was not aware of the commercial applications of the projects it manages, while its charter prevents it from getting involved. The objective of the foundation is to facilitate the progress of technology, not to act as judge and jury for its application. It’s a nice little way to keep controversy at arm’s length; inaction and negligence is seen as an appropriate defence plea.

For IBM and Google, who are noted as founding members of the OpenPower Foundation, a stance of ignorance might be enough to satisfy institutions of innocence, but the court of public opinion could swing heavily the other direction. An indirect tie to such nefarious activities is enough for many to pass judgment.

When it comes to IBM, the pursuit of innocence becomes a little bit trickier. IBM is directly mentioned on the Semptian website, suggesting Big Blue has been working closely with the Chinese firm for some time, though the details of this relationship are unknown for the moment.

For any of the US firms which have been mentioned here, it is not a comfortable situation to be in. Although they might be able to plead ignorance, it is quite difficult to believe. These are monstrous multi-national billion-dollar corporations, with hordes of lawyers, some of whom will be tasked with making sure the technology is not being utilised in situations which would get the firm in trouble.

Of course, this is not the first time US technology firms have found themselves on the wrong side of right. There have been numerous protests from employees of the technology giants as to how the technology is being applied in the real-world. Google is a prime example.

In April 2018, Google employees revolted over an initiative the firm was participating in with the US Government. Known as Project Maven, Google’s AI technology was used to improve the accuracy of drone strikes. As you can imagine, the Googlers were not happy at the thought of helping the US Government blow people up. Project Dragonfly was another which brought internal uproar, this time the Googlers were helping to create a version of the Google news app for China which would filter out certain stories which the Government deemed undesirable.

Most of the internet giants will plead their case, suggesting their intentions are only to advance society, but there are numerous examples of contracts and initiatives which contradict this position.

Most developers or engineers, especially the ones who work for a Silicon Valley giant, work for the highest bidder, but there is a moral line few will cross. As we’ve seen before, employees are not happy to aide governments in the business of death, surveillance or censorship, and we suspect the same storyline will play out here.

Google and IBM should be preparing themselves for significant internal and external backlash.