O2 and Virgin Media are merging to form BT-busting connectivity giant

Telefónica and Liberty Global have confirmed plans to merge UK operations, O2 and Virgin Media, to challenge the connectivity market leader BT.

Since the end of the Supply Chain Review, the UK telecoms market has been relatively mundane, operating as one would largely expect, however this merger throws a cat amongst the pigeons. All of a sudden, the UK has become on the most interesting markets to watch, with the promise of a second convergence connectivity business to rival market leader BT.

“Combining O2’s number one mobile business with Virgin Media’s superfast broadband network and entertainment services will be a game-changer in the UK, at a time when demand for connectivity has never been greater or more critical,” said Telefónica CEO Jose Maria Alvarez-Pallete. “We are creating a strong competitor with significant scale and financial strength to invest in UK digital infrastructure and give millions of consumer, business and public sector customers more choice and value.”

“We couldn’t be more excited about this combination,” said Mike Fries, CEO of Liberty Global. “Virgin Media has redefined broadband and entertainment in the UK with lightning fast speeds and the most innovative video platform. And O2 is widely recognized as the most reliable and admired mobile operator in the UK, always putting the customer first. With Virgin Media and O2 together, the future of convergence is here today.”

Talks emerged earlier this week, though they certainly got to the official confirmation stage quicker than many were expecting.

As part of the agreement, a 50-50 joint venture will be created, with the promise to spend more than $10 billion on network development over the next five years. Synergies are expected to be as much as £6.2 billion, with 46 million subscribers, 15 million homes passed for broadband, 99% population coverage for mobile, 18,700 employees and £11 billion in revenue.

Full details on the deal can be found on a new website, proudly proclaiming the creation of a national digital champion.

This all sounds very promising, but when the merger is complete in mid-2021, which brand will survive?


What should a merged O2/Virgin Media company be called?

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“In the long run, we believe it would be better for the JV to retain the O2 brand at the expense of Virgin Media,” said Kester Mann of CCS Insight. “Both have a strong presence, but O2’s respected customer service, highly loyal customers and sponsorship of the O2 arena mean it is impossible to drop. A multi-brand approach serves only to duplicate costs and risks confusing customers.”

For convergence to work, there can only be one brand which survives. BT’s £12.5 billion of EE has arguably not paid off to date as the two brands still exist, effectively creating two separate business units inside the same group. There might be convergence benefits from an operational perspective, but to realise the gains from a customer and commercial angle, the businesses have to be fully consolidated and coherent.

BT has never really been able to take advantage of its assets. It has the largest mobile network, the largest broadband network, the largest public wifi footprint and the largest bank accounts to throw cash at content. Its inability to evolve into a convergence-defined business has opened the door for O2 and Virgin Media. But the question is whether the duo can learn from these mistakes.

Ultimately this is a major threat to the BT business, not because this is a combination which can potentially match the scale and depth of BT services, but these are also two currently healthy businesses which are coming together.

Financial Results for O2 and Virgin Media to March 31 (UK sterling (£), millions)
O2 Virgin Media
Total Year-on-year Total Year-on-year
Revenue 1,739 2.9% 1,266 -0.6%
Profit 516 2.4% 84 >1000%

Sources: Liberty Global Investor Relations and Telefonica Investor Relations

Usually, when mergers and acquisitions are discussed, one of the parties is a significantly stronger position than the other. It can still be good news, but there is plenty of work to do during the integration stages to ensure the new company is fighting fit. This is not the case with O2 and Virgin Media.

Virgin Media might have experienced a bit of a downturn over this three-month financial period, but this could likely be attributed to dampened customer acquisition amid the COVID-19 outbreak, while O2 has demonstrated year-on-year increases once again.

While these are healthy businesses right now, some might have suggested limited success in the convergence game would have caught up eventually. This is a very encouraging move forward, getting ahead of negative impacts, though a renewed assault on TV/content is needed. Neither, despite what Virgin Media claims, have done very well in this segment.

Current subscriber numbers for O2 and Virgin Media
Mobile Broadband Content
O2 35,266,217 29,085 *
Virgin Media 3,179,500 5,271,000 3,687,400

Source: Omdia World Information Series

*Too early to tell how successful the partnership with Disney+ to add a content element to O2 bundling has been

One area which should be allocated to the risk column, though it is a very minor risk, is the prospect of regulatory intervention.

“Unlike when O2 attempted to join forces with Three in 2015 but was blocked by the European Commission, I don’t expect there to be any major hurdles to this deal going through,” said Dan Howdle, consumer telecoms analyst at Cable.co.uk. “After all, with BT’s purchase of EE given the all-clear in 2016, it’s difficult to see how a case could be made to block it.”

These are both telecoms companies, but service overlap is minimal. Core competencies lie in different segments, and while there have been attempts to launch into parallels, success has been woeful. These are complementary companies with little material service overlap.

When considering whether competition authorities will be interested, you have to ask whether the merger would make single business units stronger or is the company stronger by association with parallel services. O2’s mobile business will not be enhanced materially by Virgin Media’s MVNO proposition, and Virgin Media will not benefit from O2 at all in the fixed connectivity game. There does not seem to be any case for objection on the grounds of competition.

Aside from the direct impact for both Virgin Media and O2, the rest of the market could be spurred into action.

“Vodafone UK appears the biggest loser as the deal lays bare its weak position in the market for converged services,” said CCS Insight’s Mann. “It also looks certain to scupper its virtual network partnership struck with Virgin Media in 2019. We think this deal will trigger a ripple effect on the UK market: Vodafone, Three, Sky and TalkTalk will all be assessing their positions and further deal-making can’t be ruled out.”

This is a challenge to the industry and will create a rival to BT in mobile, broadband, convergence and enterprise. However, it is also worth remembering the ‘also rans’.

Unless the ambitions of rivals are inspired by this threat, the prospect of a tiered connectivity industry could emerge, with those offering bundled services on top and the pureplay service providers on the bottom.

The UK has quickly become one of the worlds’ most interesting telecoms markets, thanks to the permutations which could be inspired by this merger.

Tier One Tier Two Tier Three
  • BT (mobile, broadband, content)
  • O2/Virgin Media (mobile, broadband)
  • Sky (content and broadband)
  • Vodafone (mobile and broadband)
  • TalkTalk (broadband)
  • Three (mobile)
  • MVNOs
  • Alt-nets

O2 completes full convergence U-turn amid Virgin Media merger talks

Two years ago, O2 CEO Mark Evans said he was not convinced by the idea of convergence, but as merger talks between O2 and Virgin Media swell, the telco has entered into moonwalking mode.

The negotiations between O2 parent company Telefónica and Virgin Media owner Liberty Global, which have been confirmed by Telefónica’s group corporate communications team, would being together two of the UK’s connectivity heavyweights, significantly shifting competition dynamics in the telecoms market.

“A deal between O2 and Virgin Media has much logic,” said Kester Mann of CCS Insight. “Notably, it would offer each side crucial assets it severely lacks: a mobile network for Virgin and a fixed-line arm for O2. Should it come to fruition, it would transform the UK telecoms industry and a create a giant converged provider to rival BT.”

As Mann highlights above, the merger of the two parties would certainly create a converged telco capable of challenging the market dominance of BT. For one reason or another, the convergence trend was passing these telcos by, but uniting powers is a very interesting move.

At Virgin Media, this is a team which attempted to make waves with bundled service offering, but never really cracked the equation. The TV element was always a bit weak, while not owning its own mobile network was always going to put it a step behind the main players.

Current subscriber numbers for O2 and Virgin Media
Mobile Broadband Content
O2 35,266,217 29,085 *
Virgin Media 3,179,500 5,271,000 3,687,400

Source: Omdia World Information Series

*Too early to tell how successful the partnership with Disney+ to add a content element to O2 bundling has been

At O2, the executive team always made a point that the telco was a mobile connectivity business and it would not get distracted by side-missions into content or broadband. This stubborn position has of course been watered down over the last year or two, and now it appears Telefónica is embracing the convergence trend without prejudice.

To date these are companies who have been successful focusing on core competencies, but the world is of course changing, with the risks to pureplay telcos very noticeable.

“Neither company is immune to the driving need for a converged network and services,” said Paolo Pescatore of PPF Foresight.

“This is the next battle ground in the UK. Virgin Media has been one of the pioneers in this area but has been let down without a mobile network, late to market in 4G and a struggling TV business. Whereas O2’s sole focus on mobile and championing consumers will run out of steam at some point.”

What is of course worth noting is that this is a deal which is far from complete. Firstly, the duo would have to agree on a price, secondly, existing partnerships would have to be unwound, one of the brands would have to be folded into the other and finally, regulatory approval would have to be sought.

Both of these UK telcos are successful components of international corporations. Group level executives would want to ensure there the business benefits suitably financially, while also maintain a high enough stake in the merged business moving forward. This could prove to be a prickly point during the negotiations.

In terms of the existing partnerships, Virgin Media signed a very prominent MVNO agreement with Vodafone in recent months, while O2 offers MVNO services to Sky. These deals would likely have to be examined during the negotiation periods to ensure a merged party does not offer to much assistance to rivals.

Although O2 and Virgin Media are successful brands in their own right, one would have to give way to the other. BT and EE co-exist in the same group function, but the full benefits of convergence cannot be realised with two distinct brands. The teams would have to figure out which brand survives, and which one dies.

Finally, regulation. This has been an irritation for UK telcos in recent years as European authorities seem very dismissive of consolidation demands from the industry. As service overlap between O2 and Virgin Media is minimal, we suspect this will not be too much of an issue, though the likes of BT, Vodafone, Sky and Three will likely kick up a stink as the merged entity is a threatening prospect.

Should all the pieces fall into place, this is a move which could benefit both parties considerably. O2 would gain more access to fibre assets, Virgin Media to mobile infrastructure and both would be able to offer a broader portfolio of services.

Convergence is a business model which offers considerable gains in terms of customer loyalty, operational efficiencies, net promoter score, average revenue per user and momentum in diversification ventures. However, the barriers to entry are high, time consuming and very expensive. This is far from a finished deal, but it would create a much more competitive force and a potential catalyst for disruption in the UK market.

Investors scupper Sunrise expansion plans

Sunrise has cancelled an Extraordinary General Meeting (EGM) to secure acquisition funds to acquire UPC Switzerland after investors rejected the move.

Announced back in February, Liberty Global proudly proclaimed it had offloaded its Swiss business unit, UPC Switzerland, for $6.3 billion. At the time, the acquisition looked expensive, and it now appears the investors aren’t prepared to foot the bill.

“We regret cancelling the EGM,” said Peter Kurer, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Sunrise.

“We have spent a significant amount of time engaging with our shareholders and continue to believe in the compelling strategic and financial rationale of the acquisition.”

To fund the acquisition, Sunrise was attempting to force through a 2.8 billion franc rights issue, though this was opposed by Freenet, Sunrise’s biggest shareholder, as well as several other investors. With the opposition from such weighty investors, the writing was clearly on the wall for the Sunrise management team.

While the deal had already received regulatory approval, the usual stumbling block for consolidation in smaller markets, all the opposition arguments come back to the price of the acquisition.

For Sunrise, this was supposed to be a deal which would allow it to compete on a more level footing with market leader Swisscom. With UPC Switzerland introduced to the mix, Sunrise would have inherited mobile subscribers to boost market share, but also a fixed business unit which passes more than 50% of homes across Switzerland.

Theoretically, the inclusion of such assets would have enabled the business to create an attractive convergence model to challenge the leadership position of Swisscom, but it was too expensive.

Just to put things into perspective, the current market capitalisation of Sunrise is roughly $3.57 billion, less than half of the value of the acquisition. This is not necessarily unusual, though when you look at what is being acquired the numbers start to look a bit suspect.

UPC Switzerland has passed just over 2.35 million homes with its fixed network, roughly 50% of the country’s total households. It has 1.07 million broadband subscribers, and 1.04 million video customers, 599,400 of which are premium. The mobile business currently has 173,400 subscribers.

In the three-months ending June 30, revenues at UPC Switzerland stood at $315 million, a year-on-year decrease of 5.2%. The revenue dip was attributed to poor performance in the fixed business unit, though this might be down to decreased marketing activity as management team cast its eye towards the Sunrise transaction; it isn’t necessarily a dip to read into too much.

Investors clearly do not believe these numbers justify a cheque worth $6.3 billion. Just to put it into context, BT acquired EE for £12.5 billion in 2016 and inherited 30 million mobile subscribers at a very similar ARPU.

For Liberty Global, this would seem to be back to the drawing board. The team is attempting to reduce exposure in Europe, refocusing attention on South America, and this will be a disappointing outcome.

AT&T offloads Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands units to Liberty LATAM

Some might suggest this is a knee-jerk reaction to the intentions of an activist investor, though the vulture fund should not be able to claim credit for this one.

AT&T has announced it will sell its wireless and wireline operations in Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands to Liberty LATAM for $1.95 billion. The transaction is expected to close in six to nine months, depending on approvals from the FCC and the Department of Justice.

“I’m especially proud of our network and the recent network enhancements that have helped AT&T rank as the fastest network in Puerto Rico,” said Jose J. Davila, AT&T’s GM for the region. “AT&T also has the most coverage on the island, according to Mosaik.

“Our experienced and committed team members will continue to support these operations as we join Liberty Latin America. Liberty Latin America has expressed its commitment to provide high-quality communications services to the people of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. And we’re confident that it is equally committed to supporting these communities.”

Although pressure is being applied to the AT&T management team by activist investor Elliott Management, this perhaps not a move which would have been seen as attractive. The vulture fund does often approve of asset divestment in the pursuit of increased dividends and a higher share price, but the intricacies of this deal does not add up.

In an open letter to AT&T investors, Elliott Management did call for divestment but only in pursuit of refocusing the business on core activities. In other words, Elliott Management wants AT&T to focus more acutely on connectivity products and services.

Looking at this deal with Liberty LATAM, AT&T is proposing the sale of core connectivity assets but retaining the service and responsibility of FirstNet and DirecTV assets in the region. What is being released and what is being retained does not make sense if this is the influence of Elliott Management. What is more likely is this transaction would have gone ahead irrelevant of outside influences.

“This transaction is a result of our ongoing strategic review of our balance sheet and assets to identify opportunities for monetization,” said AT&T CFO John Stevens.

“But doing so only made sense if we received a fair value from a buyer that is committed to taking this well-run business, with its skilled employees and loyal customer base, and help it thrive. Liberty Latin America has a strong reputation for quality of service, and we believe they have the experience to build on the success of these operations.”

As of June 2019, AT&T’s debt stood at $158 billion, largely thanks to expensive acquisitions in the pursuit of diversification. The team has said it plans to lower its debt by $20 billion over the course of the year. The team now claims to have completed or announced monetization efforts totalling more than $11 billion.

On the other side of the transaction, Liberty LATAM is continuing its quest to reprioritise the business. Following a number of divestments in the European region, the telco has been attempting to gather momentum in the LATAM markets. This is another deal which will improve the position of the firm.

“The combination of AT&T’s leading mobile and wired businesses with Liberty Puerto Rico’s leading high-speed broadband and TV business will create a strong and competitive integrated communications player,” said Balan Nair, CEO of Liberty Latin America.

“At Liberty Latin America, we are focused on investing in digital infrastructure, innovation and 5G networks and on delivering a friendly customer service experience. This transaction is evidence of that, and we are confident that this new combination will be good for our customers and our employees, including those joining us from AT&T.”

Looking at the Liberty LATAM business, the team is certainly not shying away from investments. Aside from this deal, the team also completed the acquisition of the remaining 12.5% of United Telecommunication Services, increasing the presence across several Caribbean islands. In August, the telco also announced aggressive expansion plans for broadband in Chile and was in discussion to acquire Millicom International earlier this year.

Sky and Liberty Global allegedly in talks for full-fibre investment

Sky is reportedly in discussions with Liberty Global to add further fuel to the full-fibre machine which is engulfing the UK at an increasing rapid rate.

After a new company, Liberty Fibre Ltd, was registered with Companies House in the UK last week, parent company Liberty Global has allegedly entered talks with Sky UK to add additional investment to the scheme. According to the Financial Times, with Sky moving away from satellite connectivity for its content proposition, the team are seeking more attractive wholesales terms, with Virgin Media providing a potential alternative.

As it stands, Openreach is the incumbent wholesale partner to Sky. The wholesale giant has enjoyed market dominance in recent years, though numerous ‘alt-nets’ and alternative providers are creating a much more competitive market. Sky is supposedly in talks with Virgin Media to use its fibre network to deliver its broadband and OTT content service, and the creation of another wholesale fibre business would further lessen the dependence on Openreach in the rural locations.

The new company, Liberty Fibre Ltd, will aim to deploy full-fibre networks in locations outside of the main urban areas, the primary focus for the vast majority of network owners. Virgin Media will become the anchor tenant of the network, though should the rumoured discussions continue as planned, Sky would become an investor in the scheme and a second customer.

For Liberty Global, attracting Sky as a customer would be a significant win.

Although it does not own any of its own network assets (fixed or mobile), Sky is one of the most successful broadband providers in the UK. Although Sky has stopped reporting total subscription numbers, most estimates put the total number of broadband customers between 6.2 million and 6.5 million. This would give Sky roughly a 20% market share, even with Virgin Media and second behind BT. Currently, Sky has a fibre penetration of 38%.

The commitment of a heavyweight such as Sky would certainly lesson the financial burden of deploying a fibre network in areas where ROI projections are certainly less attractive than the dense urban environments. The attractiveness of Sky as a customer only increases when you consider the increasingly popular OTT video drive and aggressive fibre broadband marketing campaigns.

Although Sky is still primarily known for being the premium satellite pay-TV content provider in the UK, the OTT proposition, Now TV, is becoming increasingly popular. After being acquired by Comcast, Sky is likely to attract additional advertising revenues from the parent-company to further consolidate an attractive position in the UK.

After years of neglect, the full-fibre market in the UK is gathering momentum very quickly. It is still years behind other nations across the European continent, but the creation of a new fibre wholesale player will add more fuel to the blaze as glass sweeps across the isles. Liberty Fibre Ltd is an interesting idea, and if it can nail Sky as an investor and customer, its prospects will certainly head north.

Vodafone gets the green light from Europe for Liberty Global acquisition

The European Commission has given the all-clear for Vodafone’s €18.4 billion acquisition of Liberty Global’s cable operations in Germany, Hungary, Czech Republic and Romania.

There are of course conditions which Vodafone will have to adhere to, but the telco is now claiming to be Europe’s largest converged operator, with 116.3 million mobile customers, 24.2 million broadband customers and 22.1 million TV customers across 13 European countries.

“With the European Commission’s approval of this transaction, Vodafone transforms into Europe’s largest fully-converged communications operator, accelerating innovation through our gigabit networks and bringing greater benefits to millions of customers in Germany, the Czech Republic, Hungary and Romania,” said Vodafone Group CEO Nick Reid.

“This is a significant step toward enabling truly digital societies for our customers.”

Of course, Vodafone has not got it all its own way. One of the concessions relates to the German market where Vodafone has agreed to open up the cable network to Telefonica Deutschland, allowing the rival to deliver TV and broadband services. Telefonica Deutschland has been discussing ways in which it can enter into new service segments, though this concession will certainly be welcomed by the bean-counters.

On the broadcasting side, Vodafone has also agreed it will not restrict broadcasters from distributing their content also via OTT services. This concession has been designed to counter fears that the newly merged entity would inhibit the growth of OTT services across the various geographies.

Following the approval, Vodafone expects the transaction to be completed by 31 July, though not everyone will be happy with the deal.

Yesterday, credit rating agency S&P entered Vodafone onto its CreditWatch list in a negative capacity, suggesting the firm has been too adventurous on its recent spending spree. This acquisition is deemed as a significant outlay, though the firm is also exposed to several spectrum auctions in key markets, as well as operating in some areas where trading conditions are less than perfect. S&P has said it will downgrade Vodafone to BBB on approval of the deal.

Elsewhere, other analysts have been pointing to negative performance in the stock markets since the introduction of Reid as CEO and the announcement of the Liberty Global transaction. Since these two news snippets hit the headlines, Vodafone’s share price has declined by more than 30%. Vodafone might be more competitive in some European markets now, but it seems some are worried by the financial commitments.

Vodafone Germany tries to placate regulators via wholesale cable deal with Telefónica

Telefónica Deutschland will be able to sell services that run on the combined Vodafone and Unitymedia cable network in Germany, as a remedy measure taken by Vodafone to satisfy EU’s competition concern over its proposed acquisition of Liberty Global.

The two companies announced that they have entered into a definite “cable wholesale agreement” in Germany, whereby Telefónica Deutschland will offer its customers broadband services that use both the Vodafone fixed network and that of Unitymedia. The combined networks cover 23.7 million households and represent a significant upgrade to whatever Telefónica Deutschland customers are currently getting.

“The cable agreement will enable us to connect millions of additional households in Germany with high-speed internet in the future,” said Markus Haas, CEO of Telefónica Deutschland. “By adding fast cable connections, we now have access to an extensive infrastructure portfolio and can offer to even more O2 customers attractive broadband products – including internet-based TV with O2 TV – for better value for money.”

Vodafone’s plan to acquire Liberty Global in Germany (where it trades under the brand Unitymedia), the Czech Republic, Hungary, and Romania, has run into difficulty at the European Union, which raised competition concerns at the end of last year. The Commission was particularly worried that the combined business would deprive the consumers in Germany of access to high speed internet access, and the OTT services carried over it. Vodafone expressed its confidence that it would be able to satisfy the Commission’s demand. Opening its fixed internet access to its competitor is clearly one of the remedies. Also included in the remedy package Vodafone submitted to the Commission was its commitment to ensure sufficient capacity is available for OTT TV distribution.

“Our deal with Liberty Global is transformational in many ways. It is a significant step towards a Gigabit society, which will enable consumers & businesses to access the world of content & digital services at high speeds. It also creates a converged national challenger in four important European countries, bringing innovation & greater choice,” said Nick Read, CEO of Vodafone Group. “We are very pleased to announce today our cable wholesale access agreement with Telefonica DE, enabling them to bring faster broadband speeds to their customers and further enhancing infrastructure competition across Germany.”

Vodafone believed the remedial measures it put in place should sufficiently reassure the Commission that competitions will not suffer after its acquisition of Liberty Global. The company now expects the Commission to undertake market testing of the remedy package it submitted, and to give the greenlight to the acquisition deal covering the four countries by July 2019. It plans to complete the transaction by the end of July. The merger between Vodafone’s and Liberty Global’s operation in The Netherlands was approved by the EU in 2016.

Vodafone not bothered by EC objections to Liberty Global deal

The European Commission has apparently notified Vodafone of some concerns it needs to be addressed before it will approve its acquisition of Liberty Global assets.

The acquisition was announced almost a year ago but such is the way of these things that the EC has only just got around to flagging up its issues with it now. The objections haven’t been published but they have been widely reported and are presumably not a million miles away from those flagged up at the end of last year.

Anyway it doesn’t seem to have thrown Vodafone out of its stride at all and it issued the following statement. “The Commission’s Statement of Objections is an expected part of the review process. We will review the Statement and continue our constructive dialogue with the Commission.

“This is a significant, pan-European transaction that will create a fully-converged national challenger in four European markets, and we remain confident that the Commission will recognise that it will deliver considerable benefits for consumers and competition. We still expect to receive final approval in the middle of this year.”

Reading between the lines this seems to be Vodafone saying “we got this”. Being given a bunch of hoops to jump through was always going to be an inevitable part of this process and it’s probably a relief to have finally received them. Vodafone will now spend a couple of months chatting to the EC to make sure all its objections are properly addressed, with its fingers crossed throughout.

Liberty Global offloads Swiss business for $6.3 billion

Liberty Global has continued its great withdraw from the European markets with another sale, this time convincing Sunrise its 1 million Swiss customers are worth $6.3 billion.

Announcing the deal alongside its financial results, it does look to be a good deal for Liberty Global. This is a business which has been going through somewhat of a restructure, attempting to find profit in a challenging industry by refocusing resources, though it now appears the years of aggressive acquisitions and expansion have not paid off.

“The past fourteen months have been transformational for Liberty Global,” said CEO Mike Fries. “After two decades of buying, building and growing world-class cable operations in Europe, we have announced or completed transactions in six of our twelve markets at premium valuations.”

While $6.3 billion certainly pales in comparison to some of the mega-acquisitions we’ve seen in recent years, it might be worth putting a bit of context around this transaction.

UPC Switzerland has passed just over 2.3 million homes across the country, this is more than 50% of Swiss homes, currently commanding a subscriber base of 1.1 million. The video offering currently has a subscriber base of just over 1 million subscribers (645,000 of which are premium) and mobile subscriptions total 146,000.

Whether these figures justify the $6.3 billion which Sunrise is handing over we’ll let you decide, though just as a point of comparison BT bought EE, and its 30 million mobile subscribers, for £12.5 billion in 2014.

For Sunrise, such an acquisition will add buoyancy to already positive momentum. Over the last three months, Sunrise realised 42,300 postpaid net adds, UPC Switzerland was 8,500 by comparison, while Internet and TV subscribers rose by 8.3% and 14.1% year-on-year respectively.

Liberty LATAM bails out of convergence ambitions

Liberty Latin America has terminated its conversations regarding a potential acquisition of Millicom International.

Details are relatively thin on the ground, though the pair has been in discussions over a possible acquisition which would have made Liberty LATAM the largest convergence player in the Americas. What this means for the Liberty business, which has targeted growth in Latin America in recent years, remains to be seen.

“The Company remains focused on its growth strategy to deliver value for shareholders and provide market leading products and services to its customers,” Liberty said in a statement.

The acquisition talks only emerged in the last couple of weeks, though it would have been a complete takeover from Liberty Latin America. While the Liberty business is certainly in a stable position in the region, competitors have bought into the convergence buzz in recent years, with Telefonica and America Movil offering what would be considered in today’s terms as a more complete connectivity offering.

Operating in 21 countries across Latin America and the Caribbean, Liberty offers consumer and B2B cable and fixed internet services, as well as operating a subsea cable network. On the other side of the coin, Millicom commands mobile operations in eight markets, in most of which it is a market share leader. Theoretically, there was a very handy dovetail between the pair.

Latin America is certainly a market which can offer significant rewards, albeit there are notable risks as well, but it seems the convergence dream was a short-lived dalliance for Liberty LATAM. At least for the moment.