Switzerland surprised to hear it will be regulating Facebook’s cryptocurrency

In a testimony before the US Senate Facebook indicated its Libra cryptocurrency will run from Switzerland, but it forgot to ask the Swiss if that was OK.

David Marcus, who is heading up Libra on Facebook’s behalf, testified before the US Senate Banking Committee in response to profound alarm from US lawmakers at the prospect of the social media giant developing its own currency. According to CNBC he said the data and privacy regulation of the currency will be overseen by a Swiss agency, as that’s where Libra will be based, but they say that’s the first they’ve heard of it.

In his testimony, which you can watch in full here if that’s your thing, Marcus said the Swiss Federal Data Protection and Information Commissioner (FDPIC) will keep an eye on the data protection side of things, which must have only offered partial reassurance to US senators worried their citizens were vulnerable to having their data exploited yet again.

Imagine their horror, then, when they read the CNBC report and learned that Facebook and its Libra pals haven’t even made contact with the FDPIC yet. This failing, later confirmed by Facebook itself, it just the latest slip-up in what has been a frankly shambolic launch. You’d think Facebook would have dotted every ‘i’ and crossed every ‘t’ before unveiling a grand plan to revolutionise the global banking system and its failure to even check in with one of the proposed regulators it just embarrassing.

As TechCrunch notes, the data privacy side of all this is arguably the greatest concern as there will apparently be little control over developers that use the platform. Given the negative consequences of a fairly minor misuse of Facebook user data by Cambridge Analytica it’s baffling to see Facebook be so cavalier about this. The likelihood of Libra ever being set free is, on balance, increasingly small.

US lawmakers formally demand a halt to Facebook’s Libra cryptocurrency

As threatened a couple of weeks ago, the House Financial Services Committee has called for Facebook to halt its cryptocurrency plans.

The demand came in the form of a letter signed by the Chairwoman of the Committee Maxine Walters and a few other members of the House of Representatives that share her concerns. The letter was addressed to CEO Mark Zuckerberg, COO Sheryl Sandberg and CEO of Calibra, the company Facebook created to exploit the Libra opportunity, David Marcus.

“We write to request that Facebook and its partners immediately agree to a moratorium on any movement forward on Libra—its proposed cryptocurrency and Calibra—its proposed digital wallet,” opened the letter. “It appears that these products may lend themselves to an entirely new global financial system that is based out of Switzerland and intended to rival U.S. monetary policy and the dollar. This raises serious privacy, trading, national security, and monetary policy concerns for not only Facebook’s over 2 billion users, but also for investors, consumers, and the broader global economy.”

The letter went on to detail quite how worrisome this disruption to the established way of things is and how little Facebook has done so far to allay these worries. The main concern seems to be similar to that attached to all cryptocurrency, that it will provide liquidity to ‘bad actors’. The difficulty of the US poking its nose into an organization based in Switzerland seems to be the main national security concern. They also spend a paragraph reviewing Facebook’s dodgy privacy track record.

“Because Facebook is already in the hands of a over quarter of the world’s population, it is imperative that Facebook and its partners immediately cease implementation plans until regulators and Congress have an opportunity to examine these issues and take action,” concludes the letter. “During this moratorium, we intend to hold public hearings on the risks and benefits of cryptocurrency-based activities and explore legislative solutions. Failure to cease implementation before we can do so, risks a new Swiss-based financial system that is too big to fail.”

Facebook and its partners must have anticipated this kind of reaction when they made their announcement. The Libra project is so grand in its scope and ambition they couldn’t possibly have expected authorities to adopt a laissez faire attitude, even if Facebook had a spotless reputation. It’s also hard to see how Facebook can do anything other than comply with the request and prepare itself for an exhaustive oversight process. Don’t expect to see Libra in the wild anytime soon.

US politicians alarmed by Facebook’s cryptocurrency masterplan

The announcement of a new currency led by Facebook has caught the attention of US law-makers and not in a good way.

The Chairwoman of the House Financial Services Committee, Maxine Waters, is alarmed by the prospect of a massive company with a patchy track record when it comes to data protection and censorship having control of a global currency. She published the following statement on the matter soon after the unveiling of Libra.

“Facebook has data on billions of people and has repeatedly shown a disregard for the protection and careful use of this data,” said Waters. “It has also exposed Americans to malicious and fake accounts from bad actors, including Russian intelligence and transnational traffickers. Facebook has also been fined large sums and remains under a FTC consent order for deceiving consumers and failing to keep consumer data private, and has also been sued by the government for violating fair housing laws on its advertising platform.

“With the announcement that it plans to create a cryptocurrency, Facebook is continuing its unchecked expansion and extending its reach into the lives of its users. The cryptocurrency market currently lacks a clear regulatory framework to provide strong protections for investors, consumers, and the economy. Regulators should see this as a wake-up call to get serious about the privacy and national security concerns, cybersecurity risks, and trading risks that are posed by cryptocurrencies.

“Given the company’s troubled past, I am requesting that Facebook agree to a moratorium on any movement forward on developing a cryptocurrency until Congress and regulators have the opportunity to examine these issues and take action. Facebook executives should also come before the Committee to provide testimony on these issues.”

Waters isn’t the only representative to express concern and at least one Senator has joined the party, as you can see in the tweet below. Regulators are going through a period of realising they were very slow to acknowledge the magnitude of social media and they should be keen to show they’ll be less complacent about money than they were information. It seems likely that Facebook will have to jump through a lot more hoops to launch this product than it has had to previously.

Facebook leads corporate cryptocurrency initiative Libra

Social media giant Facebook has announced the launch of Libra, a ‘stablecoin’ apparently designed to revolutionise the digital payments market.

Such ambition would be highly questionable if it weren’t for the fact that Facebook has managed to get loads of other blue-chip companies involved, including Visa, Mastercard, PayPal and Coinbase. This gives the project a sense of scale and legitimacy that it wouldn’t have if this was just another gimmick to help Facebook exploit its users once more.

“Libra’s mission is to create a simple global financial infrastructure that empowers billions of people around the world,” blogged Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. It’s powered by blockchain technology and the plan is to launch it in 2020. This is especially important for people who don’t have access to traditional banks or financial services. Right now, there are around a billion people who don’t have a bank account but do have a mobile phone.”

Blockchain is a pretty complicated business, so to get how this works we recommend you go to the Libra site, read the Libra white paper and watch the videos below. Libra is described as a ‘stablecoin’, which means its value is pegged to regular currencies and thus won’t fluctuate like Bitcoin famously does. There’s also talk of almost no fees, so it will be interesting to see what incentive all the members of the Libra consortium have to participate.

Facebook’s own interests will be represented by a subsidiary called Colibra, which will produce a digital wallet that will be available in Facebook’s messaging apps as well as its own standalone one. “From the beginning, Calibra will let you send Libra to almost anyone with a smartphone, as easily and instantly as you might send a text message and at low to no cost,” said the announcement. “And, in time, we hope to offer additional services for people and businesses.”

This seems like a very ambitious project, the motives for which are still somewhat unclear. The narrative is all about extending financial services to the unbanked, but you have to assume Facebook expects to monetise this service eventually. The prospect of a company that unilaterally excludes any users it disapproves of being in control of a global currency is chilling.