EE wins the grand slam in latest OpenSignal UK report

The latest OpenSignal report shows EE has come on top in all five categories, though the winning margin in video experience was narrow.

The latest report on the UK’s mobile network experience published by the network rating firm OpenSignal pitted the country’s four nationwide operators against each other on five measurements: 4G Availability, Video Experience, Download Speed, Upload Speed, and Latency. EE has won every category.

Although EE has been in a leading position in delivering mobile experience, the competition was closer in previous OpenSignal assessments. A year ago EE and Vodafone tied in two out of four categories. Half a year ago, Vodafone was still on par with EE on delivering the lowest latency. But the BT-owned operator has opened up a gap over its competitors in most measurements lately.

The one area that EE was not a comfortable winner was video experience. As we reported earlier, higher download speed does not necessarily deliver the best video experience, according to OpenSignal’s analysis. Other technologies including traffic management and latency minimisation also feature in the evaluation. Therefore although EE’s download speed is more than 40% faster than its closest competition (Vodafone) and it also has registered the lowest latency, EE only marginally beat Vodafone in video experience. It actually came the last if video experience had been judged on 3G only (3 came on top). But thanks to the superior 4G availability EE customers would not need to fall back on 3G much when streaming video.

The report also provides regional comparison, with the country broken down to twelve regions: Eastern, East Midlands, London, North East, Northern Ireland, North West, Scotland, South East, South West, Wales, West Midlands, Yorkshire and Humber. The report dismissed the so-called “North/South divide” as a myth, with some of the “top scores appearing in the North East, North West, West Midlands and Yorkshire and Humber regions”. In an earlier report measuring 4G speed, the firm also noted that London was only mid-table, with the highest 4G download speeds registered in places like Bristol, Cardiff and Birmingham.

Here are the countrywide results:

OpenSignal_chart 4G Availability April 2019

OpenSignal_chart Video Experience April 2019

OpenSignal_chart Download Speed April 2019

OpenSignal_chart Upload Speed April 2019

OpenSignal_chart Latency April 2019

South Korean consumers will get 5G service starting from $48 a month

5G for consumers is expected to launch late this week in South Korea. The three mobile operators in the market have published their 5G packages, starting from 55,000 won and going up to 130,000 won.

After launching the pilot B2B 5G services simultaneously in December, South Korea annouced it would launch consumer 5G service by the end of March. But there was a minimum delay. When the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G hits the retail market on Friday 05 April, all three mobile operators in the country, SKT, KT, and LG Uplus (LGU+), are expected to switch 5G services on. In addition to fast internet, there will also have a 5G UHD live broadcasting service that KT is going to launch.

In the run-up to it, all three of them have published the price list of their data packages:

south-korea-5g-pricing

Earlier in March, the Ministry of Science and ICT rejected a price proposal from SKT that set the entry price at 70,000 won ($62), deeming it too expensive and “restricting consumers’ choice.” The three operators then agreed to set the starting price according to the Ministry’s expectations at 55,000 won ($48). Park Jung-ho, SKT’s CEO was quoted by the local media outlet The Investor, “there was a request for a pricing plan in the range of 55,000 won (from the government). We are about to wrap up the discussion.”

Despite the equal starting price, there are differences between offers. While a 55,000 won package on KT and SKT will get the consumer 8GB data, the same price on LGU+ will come with 9GB. The most expensive offers on SKT and LGU+ are priced at 120,000 won and 95,000 won respectively, giving users 300GB and 250GB. Any packages from 80,000 won upward on KT will give users unlimited data.

There are also different speed caps. Speed will be capped at 1Mbps if the user chooses the starting package from KT and LGU+ and goes beyond his data limit. Higher package users on KT will have unlimited speed, while speed for users of LGU+’s higher packages will be capped at 5Mbps and 7Mbps if they go beyond their monthly data limit. KT also offers free international data roaming (185 countries outside of South Korea), but the roaming data speed will be capped at 100Kbps on the 80,000 won and 100,000 won packages, and at 3Mbps on the most expensive130,000 won package. SKT has not released details on its data speed cap policies.

However, although the 80,000 won package with unlimited data on KT is cheaper than the current LTE packages offered by the operators, consumer advocacy groups argue that 5G users could end up paying up to 20,000 won ($18) per month more than they do now with LTE unlimited data packages now. This is calculated by including the high price of the Samsung Galaxy S10 5G, which is set to be sold at 1.4 million won ($1,231). The LG V50 ThinQ is only going to be able to reach the retailers in Korea after May, company sources told ZDNet. There is no information when or if the 5G smartphones from other suppliers will reach the Korean market.

“Those who spend 30,000 to 40,000 won on telecom bills would not be able to use 5G network services. It is the worst pricing plan in the era of worsening income disparity,” said People’s Solidarity for Participatory Democracy, an activist group, quoted by The Investor.

DoJ rumoured to be half-convinced by T-Mobile/Sprint 5G argument

The anti-trust chief in the Department of Justice is said to be receptive to T-Mobile and Sprint’s argument that the combined company will improve America’s competitiveness in 5G.

Fox Business reporter Charlie Gasparino claimed people close to Makan Delrahim, Assistant Attorney General for the DoJ’s Antitrust Division, have disclosed that the department is receptive to the argument that a third strong operator in the US will help the country compete better with China.

Gasparino first tweeted about his “Scoop sources” before he went on the screen:

As we reported earlier, the proposed merger still needs to overcome two barriers before it can be completed: the DoJ and the FCC. Gasparino explained that, unlike the FCC which needs a panel decision, the DoJ’s decision rests on Delrahim’s office alone. It looks that the argument for 5G competitiveness from the merger is outweighing his concerns for anti-trust consequences. Also significantly, Gasparino said, the FCC tends to follow the DoJ’s decision in cases like this.

5G has always been a central argument in the merger case. In its public interest statement published in June 2018, the companies stressed the investment commitment and the benefits the New T-Mobile would bring to America. $40 billion in the development of a nationwide 5G network and services will be made by 2024. “The New T-Mobile network will have approximately double the total capacity and triple the total 5G capacity of T-Mobile and Sprint combined, with 5G speeds four to six times what they could achieve on their own,” the companies said in the close to 700-page document.

The argument of competing with China on 5G with a third strong operator comes days after the companies claimed the merger would benefit up to 50 million Americans who currently do not have access to broadband, when T-Mobile launched its LTE FWA trial.

Meanwhile, the position of FCC is not getting clearer. On 7 March, for the third time, the agency put a hold on its 180-day countdown to gather feedback while ploughing through new information, which, FCC detailed, is related to the extension of a simulation model for the merger provided by the companies. The Commission will re-open the countdown at day 122 on 4 April.

The market was encouraged by the news. Both companies’ share prices grew following Gasparino’s tweet. T-Mobile closed the day up by 1.42%, and Sprint’s up by 1.75%.

Half of British millennials are getting sick of the internet – report

A new EY report shows 50% of 25-34-year olds are looking to ‘digital detox’, the highest proportion of all age groups.

The “Decoding the digital home 2019” report, published by EY, the professional service firm, was done based an online survey of 2,500 British households in late 2018. In addition to the high proportion of youth wishing to increase their time away from smartphones and other internet connected devices, more people are spending less time online. The percentage of households spending more than 30 hours online per week has gone down from 34% a year ago to 28%, while those spending less than 10 hours online has slightly increased from 18% to 21%.

There are also other surprises. For example, more consumers are happy with their fibre connections (59%, up from 54% a year ago) but also higher number of young people are ready to ditch the fixed broadband (43%). 42% of 18-24-year olds are happy to pay a premium to get the latest gadgets, but only 18% of the 25-year olds and above, who would have more disposable income, are prepared to do so.

The key message that the telecoms and internet industries should take away from the survey, however, is that consumers want simplicity, proof of trust, and assurance of security.

Both service and content providers are confusing consumers with over-complex packages, causing anxiety among users, including the youth. 46% of households think there are too many different broadband, mobile, and content bundles, so most of them will not add anything new to the packages they already subscribe to. Content providers are trying to maximise the distribution channels they can use, therefore making their content available across different packages, platforms, and apps. However, nearly a quarter of all surveyed households found it hard to track their favourite content. This number rose to close to 40% among the 18-24-year olds, the so-called “digital natives”.

The high-profile cases of comprised private data have instilled more caution to consumers. 72% of respondents said that even when dealing with brands they trust they would be very cautious about disclosing their personal financial information online.

On the other hand, the heated debates over “fake news” have driven more consumers less confident in the “new media”. 44% of households responded that they now only trust the traditional news sources. In a teaser to an upcoming report, EY disclosed that over half of all households only watch the five traditional channels on TV.

But it is not all bad news especially for the mobile industry. In 15% of the households surveyed, smartphones are now the main devices to go online with (up from 11% in 2017), at the expense of laptops (down from 44% to 39%). When it comes to consumer spending, slightly more are willing to pay for ad-free streaming (up from 16% to 18%) and slightly fewer are holding their purse strings as tightly as possible when it comes to spending on communication services (down from 55% to 53%)

“Our latest survey highlights both opportunities and challenges for TMT providers. They will be pleased to see that consumers are willing to pay for premium services, but they will also be concerned that customers are overwhelmed and confused by the variety of bundles available,” said Praveen Shankar, EY’s Head of Technology, Media and Telecommunications for the UK & Ireland. “Looking ahead, it is essential for providers to simplify their propositions and offer easier to understand and clearly communicated product and services.”

ey-decoding-the-digital-home-2019

 

Loon bolsters connectivity credentials with advisory board signings

Alphabet’s latest X graduate Loon has added industry heavyweights to its advisory board as the business searches for commercial credibility in the world of connectivity.

As the ludicrous dream starts to become a reality, Loon has added three industry veterans to its ranks. Former McCaw Communications CEO Craig McCaw, Evernote CEO Ian Small and Verizon EVP Global Media & New Business Marni Walden will all be added to the roster, bringing with them years of experience and, perhaps more importantly, connections in the telco space.

“As Loon transitions to a commercial business and looks to partner with MNOs worldwide, we’re adding some serious expertise to our ranks with a new Advisory Board that brings together top wireless innovators with decades of experience in the industry,” Loon CEO Alastair Westgarth wrote in a blog post.

For those who have missed out on this blue-sky thinking idea, Loon is Alphabet’s latest attempt to branch into the connectivity segment. Previous efforts might have been a flop, just have a look at the success brought through Google Fiber, but this is something slightly different; its attempting to create a new segment rather than steal business from established players.

By floating these massive balloons 18-23km above the earth for periods of up to 100 days, the Loon team claims each balloon can create a connectivity cone with coverage to a ground area 80km in diameter. The balloons are fitted with a broad-coverage LTE base station and a high-speed directional link used to connect between balloons and back down to the internet infrastructure on the ground.

In an industry which has constantly struggled to bridge the digital divide due to the expense of deploying infrastructure, this is a genuinely innovative approach to providing connectivity. It helps lessen the financial pressures of delivering the internet, adding to the connectivity mix.

Back in November at AfricaCom, Westgarth gave some insight into the business on the main conference stage. At the time he announced the beginning of a commercial relationship with Telkom Kenya, as well as outlining the wider ambitions of the business. This is an idea which has big commercial potential, most of which will be in the developing markets. These are after all areas where ARPU is low and deployment is staggered. It would appear to be the perfect mix for Loon’s proposal to bring the internet to the masses.

These appointments however perhaps suggest Loon is not a firm satisfied with the developing markets alone. These are three US executives who have considerable experience in the domestic market. Of course, there will be connections in the international space with telcos in the developing nations, but perhaps Loon has spotted an opportunity in the US. These executives would certainly help pave the way for conversations across the homeland.

Of course, this is just a theory and the PR team have been, just as you would expect, pretty evasive when asked the question. However, the digital divide is certainly a challenge in the US. For those who are lucky enough to live in the cities, they’ll have no concept of connectivity challenges, but the vast expanses and challenging terrain of the US open up numerous, huge not-spots, despite what the telcos actually tell you.

Loon has been touted as an innovation for the developing markets but seeing as the US telcos are clueless as how to solve the domestic digital divide, why not. These executives will certainly know the right people in the right places.

Cuba enters mobile internet age with 3G few can afford

Cuba’s telecom operator will offer 3G data service to prepaid users, but with high-tariffs one question remains; can any of the locals actually afford it?

The previously isolated communist state has undergone gradual reform since the more pragmatic Miguel Diaz-Canel took over at the helm, and one of the goals is to catch up the rest of the world on internet adoption and to develop an information society. As an important step towards this direction, Cuba’s the state-owned telecom operator ETECSA (Empresa de Telecomunicaciones de Cuba S.A.) announced (in Spanish) that the company will start offering 3G data services to its prepaid customers from 6 December, one year after it started offering internet connections to residential locations. Before that, most Cubans could only go online from internet cafes.

The monthly packages (in Spanish) start at 600 MB data which will cost 7CUC ($7), going up to 1 GB (10CUC), 2.5 GB (20CUC), and 4GB which will cost 30CUC. Another 300 MB will be granted for free on top of all packages for visiting local website (domain .cu). Otherwise, 1CUC can get 50 MB For email use only (on ETECSA’s email service Nauta). The service is on 900 MHz only, meaning handsets will have to be compatible to that specific frequency. Users applying to use the service can activate directly over-the-air with the operator.

internet_movil_planes

There is no recent data on Cuban income from sources like the World Bank. Earlier data showed the average monthly salary was about $27 to $32, though independent survey and research have indicated that many locals do make extra income through different channels. Even with the additional income, the data packages are way too high for most users. Research in other emerging markets has shown that the adoption of broadband will take off when the cost of the package reaches below 5% of monthly disposable income.

The operator could be pricing its packages to limit the number of users, as its networks are not capable of coping with high traffic volume yet. As the national monopoly, ETECSA has installed 1,078 2G base station, and 789 3G base stations, according to its published data. In its announcement the operator also warns users that in the first days of the service there may be down time, and asks consumers to inform the operator through official channels.

According to research by Ovum, mobile penetration in Cuba went just over 44% by the end of Q2 this year. The country’s internet population (“permanent internet accounts”) has reached 1.9 million.

Mobile data could get even costlier after T-Mobile and Sprint merger

Report by Rewheel showed Americans already have the most expensive mobile data among all four-operator markets. A move to reduce the number of them could make it worse.

According to the 2H2018 release of its mobile data price monitoring report, the Finland-based research firm Rewheel focused on the US market, which is likely to see the proposed merger of T-Mobile and Sprint closing in the first half of 2019. The report showed that among the 41 countries it analysed (OECD34 + EU28, with seven EU countries not being OECD members), the median gigabyte price of a smartphone deal (nominal price + VAT) in the US is among the highest. Rewheel told Telecoms.com that Greece and Cyprus topped the table, followed by Korea and Canada. The median gigabyte price of a mobile broadband deal in the US is the most expensive among all.

Rewheel mobile data prices

The research compared two groups of markets, those with effectively four mobile operators and those with three. The mobile data price in the four-MNO markets is shown to be about half as expensive as the three-MNO markets, but the US is an outlier. The median US mobile data price per gigabyte is four times higher than the EU four-MNO markets, and sixteen times higher than the big EU markets with four MNOs.

To look at it from another angle, a 30€ monthly deal comes with unlimited data plans (and at least 1000-minute talk time) on smartphones in 13 markets (Korea, Mexico, and 11 EU countries) but can only buy 6GB in the US. Similarly, a 30€ monthly wireless broadband deal can buy unlimited data in 11 EU markets but can only get 40GB in the US.

The effect of the “magic four” driving price down is most telling in Italy: after Iliad launched its mobile service, the price per gigabyte fell by 70% in half a year. On the other hand, the research showed data price stopped falling in the Dutch market after the announced merger of T-Mobile and Tele2, and the price drop has visibly slowed down in Austria after it became a three-MNO market.

The researcher therefore argued that the Americans are already paying more than other four-MNO market users, it could get even worse if the US market became a three-horse race. However we can see in the data that North America is generally more expensive, with Canada, a four-MNO market, is as expensive as the US. Admittedly though, Freedom Mobile is still weak.

An additional angle to examine data price is to look at what is offered to contract users vs. prepaid users, which is excluded from the Rewheel research. The discrepancy is probably most obvious in Africa. According to the analysis published by the research firm Ovum, South Africa’s mobile data is among the highest in the world. This is largely down to the high prices PAYG users face when buying smaller data packages. Rob Shuter, the CEO of MTN, corroborated with his comments at the recent AfricaCom that, despite the average price per gigabyte for postpaid users in Africa is comparable to that of the US (around $3), data prices for prepaid users are prohibitive. The large majority of mobile users in Africa and other emerging markets are on prepaid services.

Operators stress the need to collaborate over 5G

At Huawei’s MBBF 2018 event some of its operator partners talked up the need for greater collaboration, including among themselves, to make a success of 5G.

Howard Watson, CTIO of BT, said “we truly need interoperability,” when detailing all the many moving parts that need to work with each other in order to make all this 5G hype a reality. He identified the TIP initiative as an example of operators collaborating towards a common goal and was careful to stress that he thinks vendors can still raise their game in that area too.

Being given a keynote at MBBF is also a great opportunity for a spot of self-promotion and Watson didn’t hold back. We were reminded of the recent announcement of EE’s 2019 5G rollout plans and even its most recent 5G trial in London. He also took the opportunity to talk up BT’s group strategy, using the diagram you can find here, which BT is bafflingly keen on, to illustrate his point.

Once Watson got all this corporate chest-beating out of his system he did flag up one interesting feature of BT’s broader strategy: the tight integration of wifi into the overall connectivity picture for BTEE customers. BT is extending the IMS network it currently uses for wifi calling in order to facilitate this and will be doing some clever stuff to solve the pain currently experienced when trying to dynamically switch between wifi and cellular. Creating all this simplicity is very complicated, he concluded.

We also heard from Alex Choi, Head of T-Labs at Deutsche Telekom. He couldn’t resist a bit of light self-congratulation in flagging up its 5G efforts in Berlin (in partnership with Huawei). He too stressed the need for ‘an ecosystem approach’ to 5G and highlighted HD video streaming as a key use-case for consumers.

Throttling video streaming is not criminal but Xfinity has botched the move

Comcasts’s Xfinity Mobile is going to limit video streamed over cellular to 480p resolution and cap hotspot speeds at 600 kbps unless customers pay more.

In a letter sent to current customers, which inevitably got posted online for all to see (on Reddit), Xfinity Mobile announced two changes to its service: it will limit the resolution of video streaming over cellular networks to 480p (so-called “DVD quality”), and it will cap the speed of hotspots powered by mobile device to 600kps. Although it may help customers’ data plans last longer, ultimately this is a measure to control cost. Comcast does not have its own mobile network and is reselling Verizon Wireless’s data.

Limiting the resolution of mobile video streaming is nothing new. YouTube will fall back to SD (240p or 360p) when the network quality degrades, prioritising continuous play over picture quality. For a long time, Netflix had by default capped the resolution of streaming over cellular at 600p before it gave users the choice to go for higher resolution.

Neither is limiting tethering using mobile hotspots. When T-Mobile launched its Uncarrier programme “One”, mobile tethering speed was limited at 128kps. Even with the expensive “One Plus” the hotspot speed was only lifted to 512kps.

However Xfinity could have handled the issues better to avoid the backlash on its reputation. Xfinity should realise that the increasing popularity of video streaming is the main driver for data consumption. Therefore when designing the products it should either raise the data plan cap of its “Unlimited” data plan, currently at 20GB, or go for real “unlimited” but bill different customers based on the speeds offered, like the common practice in Finland, where per capita mobile data consumption is the highest in the world.

More importantly, Xfinity should have given its existing customers the grace period till their current contracts ran out if it wanted to avoid antagonizing them. Exerting new limitations and charging additional fee for services that are in the original contract is even potentially a breach of contract on the service providers’ side.

Shuffle Sites: Lighting and Connecting the Smart City

This article is brought to you in partnership with Huawei

 

The MBB Sector Is Set for a New Wave of Explosive Growth

As the number of mobile broadband (MBB) users explodes with an ever-increasing demand for diverse services, data traffic is experiencing sharp growth like never before. Network quality is a key differentiator for data-savvy customers. Towns and cities across the world need a highly performing network and broadband infrastructure to implement their smart initiatives that will bring huge benefits for their citizens.

Telecom operators need to improve the coverage and the capacity of their mobile networks. As site acquisition becomes increasingly difficult, the focus is turning to new ways to roll out services, improve the user experience and develop 5G networks while meeting strict government requirements on integration and appearance.

Shuffle Site – a joint innovation

Partners of cities worldwide, Huawei and Schréder, having been working together for the past year to deliver Shuffle Site – a multi-functional street lighting platform that incorporates Huawei’s built-in small cell to provide wider broadband coverage and boost capacity while meeting government regulations.

Technological cooperation turns street lights into base stations

With street lights widely available throughout towns and cities, they are ideally placed to quickly deliver extensive coverage, support large amounts of data traffic, and improve the user experience.
Huawei’s outdoor integrated small cells as well as their antennas and transmission devices have been perfectly integrated into the Shuffle to meet the requirements of the local municipalities and carriers regarding the appearance of small cells. The small cell has also been designed to accommodate 5G networks in the future.
The Shuffle Site represents much more than a high-value data traffic hub. It can also integrate public address systems, surveillance cameras, WiFi modules and sensors to enable cities to provide multiple services in one aesthetic column, reducing their carbon footprint. It is simply, the ideal platform for cities to implement smart city initiatives.

In addition, by collaborating with telecom operators, cities could give themselves an enormous economic advantage. The first cities to have 5G, which is 100 times faster than 4G, will undoubtedly, attract technology companies who want to develop new products and services.

Success across industries

By adopting the Shuffle Site, telecom operators will save time and money in new site deployment, reducing CAPEX and OPEX by over 40%. The acquisition period will be cut from six months to one. Pilot installations have proven that the download rate for subscribers increased by three times.

The Shuffle Site can be installed in densely populated areas, including pedestrian areas, squares, railway stations, metro stations, residential areas, urban roads, and tourist attractions.

In addition to providing a solution to the recurrent problem of site acquisition this joint innovation contributes to enhancing the city landscape. It provides the perfect infrastructure to ensure a successful collaboration for many stakeholders.