KT and Nokia will join hands to launch first ‘true’ 5G this month

Korea’s mobile operator KT is going to launch nationwide 5G service this month and will collaborate with Nokia to provide services and tools for the business and the public sectors.

Hwang Chang-Gyu, KT’s Chairman and CEO, recently announced that KT’s nationwide 5G network will be switched in March to cover 24 major cities, key transport routes such as expressways, subways, high-speed railways, large universities, and neighbourhood shopping areas. This will be an upgrade from the synchronised launch of 5G services with limited scale on 1 December 2018 by all the three national mobile operators.

“In March, KT will be the first in the world to introduce ‘True’ 5G mobile services,” said Hwang. “In the 5G era, neckband cameras, AR glasses and all kinds of devices will be connected to 5G, contributing to a better life for mankind.” That this was a personal historic moment should not to be lost. Exactly four years ago at MWC 2015, Hwang predicted a commercial 5G network by 2019. “Today, I would like to announce that the promise I made four years ago has finally been fulfilled,” Hwang added in his MWC speech.

The current 5G service that KT, SKT, and LG Plus are offering is fixed-wireless access targeted at business users. During the recent MWC, KT demonstrated plenty of 5G gimmicks for the consumer market, from a 5G connected robot butler bringing a bottle of water to the doorstep to a 5G and AI powered robot barista fixing cocktails.

KT is clearly banking big hope on 5G. Its Economic and Management Research Institute predicted that the socioeconomic value created by 5G will contribute to 1.5% of the country’s GDP by 2025. To realise such potential and to achieve serious monetisation of 5G, KT is looking towards the enterprise market and the public sector. The company announced that it plans to focus on five key areas with its 5G offers: smart cities, smart factories, connected cars, 5G media, and the 5G cloud. It says it is collaborating with various businesses as well as the Korean government to develop 5G services for both Business to Business (B2B) industries and Business to Government (B2G) sectors.

This is an echo to what Marcus Weldon, Nokia’s CTO and the President of Bell Labs, called for during his own speech at MWC. Weldon suggested the telecom industry should focus more on serving other verticals instead of on consumer markets, to deliver the true value of 5G. He did concede that it would need three to five years before telcos can see meaningful revenues from enterprise 5G. But when they do, Weldon predicted the business will soon equal that being made in the consumer 5G segment.

It just happened that KT and Nokia are going to collaborate closely in 5G. During MWC the two companies signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to collaborate on various 5G technologies. “We are excited to partner with Nokia to conduct these path-breaking trials,” said Jeon Hong-Beom, KT’s CTO. “This collaboration will ensure that we are able to leverage Nokia’s proven solutions and best-in-class professional services to provide a superior and differentiated experience to our subscribers.”

“With Korea, one of the lead countries in the early deployment of 5G, we are delighted to be working with KT to help them build a future-ready network,” added Bhaskar Gorti, President of Nokia Software. “Nokia’s end-to-end portfolio will empower KT to improve its customer experience and network efficiency.”

The key areas of the collaboration will include Service Orchestration and Assurance for the 5G era, with the aim of delivering end-to-end automation and new revenue opportunities for KT’s enterprise customers. This will be supported by the enabling technologies like NFC and network slicing. The joint work will start in Seoul later this year.

Giesecke+Devrient lands Swatch contactless payment gig

Mobile security company Giesecke+Devrient is helping Swiss watch company Swatch with its own contactless payment technology.

Rather annoyingly called SwatchPAY!, the contactless platform was launched in China back in 2017 and is now available in Switzerland. It involves sticking an NFC chip in a watch, which you can then sync with your credit card. In that respect it’s pretty much a contactless card embedded in a watch.

Whether it functions just as easily is unclear, but Swatch seems to have partnered with all the right companies, including Mastercard, Credis Suisse, UBS and G+D. The latter is doing what it does best in providing the secure element for these watches, which also enables the activation of the contactless payment function in-store, when you buy one. Here’s how it works.

Swatchpay chart

“Continuous innovation is a key strand of the Swatch DNA,” said Carlo Giordanetti, Swatch Creative Director. “This latest advance, with the introduction of the fastest and simplest tokenization, makes it easier than ever to pay ‘forever’ – token up your Swatch, swipe it and you’re done. SwatchPAY! is simple, stylish and swatchy.”

“We are thrilled to be Swatch’s partner for this payment-enabled watch, which has been a huge success in China,” said Carsten Ahrens, CEO of Giesecke+Devrient Mobile Security. “The unique mix of iconic Swatch design and a payment functionality makes this a very appealing product, and we are proud to have contributed our extensive expertise in security, mobile payment and wearables technology.”

The Swiss watch industry has been in a flap about smart watches for a while, so it’s sensible to see one of them develop its own contactless payment platform. They’re fortunate that the killer use-case for smart watches hasn’t been found yet, but it presumably will be eventually. The key to this alternative being a success will be its ease of setup and use and it looks like they might have got that right.

Is mobile payment going too far when cash has become unacceptable?

When mobile payment with smartphones has become the means of choice at retail outlets, the central bank of China needed to remind businesses they should not reject cash payment.

Once upon a time, people said “cash is king”. Not anymore.

In most retail outlets in China, mobile payment with smartphone apps WeChat Pay (of Tencent) and Alipay (of Alibaba) has become the de facto option. Customers with credit or debit cards only, including the cards on UnionPay (China’s clearing platform), are sometimes in bad luck. It turns out even cash payment may not go all the way, which prompted the central bank, People’s Bank of China, to issue a warning notice to the retailers that rejecting cash is against the law.

This fast and massive move towards mobile apps based payment dwarves the slow uptake of NFC based contactless payment championed by the technology companies. This is despite the tech heavy weights Apple and Google having been supporting NFC payment since 2014. The enthusiasm in which consumers and businesses embrace it, even with the clout of Apple and Google thrown behind it, has been underwhelming.

According to the research firm Berg Insight, the total number of NFC enabled POS terminals grew by almost 100% in 2017 to reach 54.5 million, most actively in North America and Western Europe. Only about 30 million of the terminals have been activated.

Apple has refused to disclose user numbers or transaction values related to Apple Pay, although different research has put the number of users who could pay with Apple Pay and who actually did it at about 3%. The uptake of Android Pay is no better. The comparable adoption rate is estimated at about 1%.

It is safe to say Apple CEO Tim Cook’s ambition to replace wallets with Apple Pay has not gone too smoothly. Mr. Cook himself was reported to have been rejected to pay for his coffee with Apple Pay by a barista, reported The Information.

In contrast, WeChat Pay and Alipay did not only handle over 90% of China’s $16 trillion mobile payment transactions in 2017, they are also actively expanding overseas. An agreement was signed last week with the Kenya based Equity Bank to bring the services to eastern Africa including Uganda, Tanzania, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, and Rwanda, in addition to Kenya. With a smartphone penetration level much lower than in China, we do not believe retailers in Africa will rush to refuse cash payment though.