Openet exec gets red-pilled, joins Matrixx

Marc Price, CTO for the Americas at BSS vendor Openet, has decided to find out how deep the rabbit-hole goes by defecting to competitor Matrixx Software.

He will get to travel a bit more in his new role at Global CTO for Matrixx and he had been at Openet for 15 years, so it was probably time for a change. The move will also allow  Matrixx Founder Dave Labuda to step away from the techie side of things and focus his attention entirely on some serious chief execing.

“Marc is a tremendous addition to Matrixx’s executive leadership team,” said Labuda. “His experience will be invaluable as we continue to scale the company. Marc’s vision and vast experience in the telecommunications market is renowned. He has played a leading role across three key eras in the telco market: the rise of competitive carriers; the establishment of the real time charging model; and the current process of digital transformation and subsequent move to hybrid clouds and IoT.”

“Matrixx is poised to lead the digital commerce revolution being ushered in with the advancement of cloud technology and the advent of 5G,” said Price. “I’m excited to join the team at such an important time to help accelerate Matrixx’s global growth. I am looking forward to working with the Matrixx team to help scale the company, driving Matrixx’s innovation to further accelerate our customers’ digital transformations.”

Openet and Matrixx aren’t just competing BSS vendors, they’re both trying to disrupt the market by presenting a more flexible, cloud-based approach to customer engagement for operators. They’re both fond of buzzwords such as ‘digital transformation’ and like to paint larger BSS competitors as slow and anachronistic. So culturally this should be a straightforward move for Price and, at least until they find his replacement, may mean a fair bit more work for Openet Founder and CTO Joe Hogan.

BSS – change and adapt, or die

Telecoms.com periodically invites third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this piece Tony Gillick, Tony is GVP Solutions Management at Openet, takes a look at the current state of the BSS business.

Recent news from Ericsson that it is spending SEK 6.1billion (approx. £530million) to restructure its BSS business comes as little surprise. Approaches to operator mobile service monetisation and underlying BSS has changed beyond recognition over the past few years. Traditional delivery mechanisms, when operators tied themselves to one major vendor for all its service monetisation needs are over – and the telecoms industry needs to accept it and move on.

The big bang approach to BSS transformation doesn’t work. For Ericsson to base their Revenue Manager solution on an end to end BSS stack that would replace existing legacy BSS was a brave move. The rewards could have been very high, but then again so were the risks.

Monetising new services is already going to be an uphill struggle for operators, adopting the right tools can make life all the more easy for them. These tools will see the overhaul of service delivery models and service architectures, and the brave adoption of new technologies and approaches. For the telecoms industry, such change is daunting and risky but more important than ever before.

A chance at survival

In today’s world, everywhere you turn there’s a vendor or an operator talking about change and the need to evolve. Yet, for many, it’s evident that the definition of digital transformation remains unclear. Operators and vendors must remove themselves from the echo-chamber in which they find themselves. They need to find a new source of truth, one that encourages and promotes innovation and new thinking, but also highlights their failings, and allows them to successfully explore the new trends driving industry change.

Doing this is tough, however. For the legacy operator, adapting to quickly evolving industry and consumer trends can prove daunting and complex, and very much out of their comfort zone. But today’s reality means that consumers are no longer prepared to wait for their operator to act and deliver the service they need. Consumers have little loyalty to their operator brand and will churn if they feel they aren’t getting value for money or the service they want, when they want it. At the same time, industry trends and the availability of cloud-native technologies is allowing new players, who previously had no skin in the telecoms game, to enter the market. In the face of these new entrants, who have a wealth of new applications and services to offer, legacy operators must take action if they are to have a chance of survival.

What does change look like?

Understanding what change really means is probably operators’ and vendors’ biggest challenge. Yet these answers can be easily found in the trends driving industry transformation.

Operators and vendors must change how they think about transformation. It’s not enough to simply adopt new technologies, operators and vendors must truly get behind the concepts such as open source technologies, and the sharing of new ideas and methods to drive innovation. According to a 2018 TM Forum industry survey, cultural obstacles are one of the biggest issues when it comes to encouraging transformation. Operators and vendors need to leave behind their legacy mindset and begin to embrace collaboration and partnerships. Allowing new relationships to flourish based on mutual understanding and benefit will help underpin digital transformation’s success. Operators just cannot afford to be shackled by their supplier, and similarly, vendors must have the trust of their operator customer to take risks and innovate through new technologies and approaches.

It is only through this cultural change and collaborative approach that operators and vendors will truly be able to leverage the capabilities of new technologies and approaches such as AI, microservices and DevOps. These approaches will be key to developing the platform-based tools and services that operators will need to deploy new offers rapidly, and monetize new services such as 5G and IoT.

The road to digital transformation success is a long and winding one, with many uncertainties along the way. Digital transformation cannot be seen as a destination or an end-goal, it’s an ever-evolving ‘thing’ that will continue to be so long as the industry exists. Operators and vendors have their work cut out to make change a reality, but it’s by learning from the failures of others, and embracing new thinking and new tools that the industry will truly change. In doing so, operators will start to reap the rewards of launching new services by seeing subscriber churn decrease and customer engagement increase. Ultimately, it’ll be the difference between them thriving and merely surviving.

 

CREATOR: gd-jpeg v1.0 (using IJG JPEG v80), quality = 82“Tony Gillick is the GVP Solutions Management for Openet. Previous to this Tony has headed up product management, solutions engineering and systems architecture for Openet. He’s been with Openet for more than 15 years and has managed BSS implementations for some of the leading service providers in the world.”

Digital transformation: are we there yet?

Telecoms.com periodically invites third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this piece Martin Morgan, VP Marketing at Openet, reflects on what a recent survey tells us about the telecoms industry’s progress towards digital transformation.

Digital transformation is throwing a spanner in the works for telecoms service providers. There has never been more pressure on operators to change and evolve into agile, flexible, providers that can meet increasing consumer demand for more data, more content and more services. Most service providers have started on their digital transformation projects for this very reason – but there is still a long way to go and a lot to play for.

In its annual industry survey Telecoms.com Intelligence revealed that digital services revenue could reach $462 billion in 2022, up from an anticipated $294 billion in 2019. Yet despite this huge revenue opportunity, operators are still some time off from monetizing new digital services, with the survey revealing that in 2022 the majority of operators will only be halfway along the digital transformation “journey”. With this clear gap in digital transformation progress and future revenues, how can service providers evolve in a way that will allow them to plug into digital services of the future?

Understanding the opportunity

Digital transformation is everywhere, and today, it permeates every aspect of telco operations with many service providers placing efforts on tackling it. The good news is that many service providers have already embarked on their digital transformation projects, and are already starting to benefit from the new revenues generated by digital services. But progress remains slow. According to telecoms.com, the majority of service providers will only consider themselves a third of the way into their digital transformation journey by 2019. That’s not very far ahead at all, and considering the work that still needs to be done to ensure service providers can capitalize on new revenue opportunities, it’s evident that a change is required to speed things up.

It is critical that service providers seize the opportunity to change now. The speed at which the industry is evolving means transformation is no longer a ‘nice to have’ option, but rather one of survival. As shown by the telecoms.com Intelligence survey, the future of service provider revenues lies in digital services, with enterprise IoT, smart home and consumer IoT anticipated to be the biggest revenue earners in the coming few years. Unlocking the potential of these new digital services will only happen if service providers can succeed in their digital transformation efforts.

As with most things, digital transformation is easier said than done. With service providers citing insufficient business cases, general inertia, over-reliance on legacy systems and CapEx constraints as the top 4 obstacles to digital transformation, it’s clear to see that service providers’ challenges are varied and multi-faceted.

Making OSS/BSS the solution, not the problem

The telecoms industry is filled with dos and don’ts when it comes to digital transformation, with different experts voicing different opinions about where operators should start. Unfortunately, no one has yet come up with a definitive answer, but industry associations such as TM Forum are placing a huge emphasis on the importance of upgrading legacy OSS/BSS if organisations are to become ‘digital-ready’. OSS/BSS is critical to enabling fast time to market and gives service providers the ability to try out new business models, at a much faster pace and lower cost than existing systems. This is a crucial element of digitization – service providers simply cannot afford to go at their current pace if they are to manage increasing mobile data and subscriber demand for an enhanced user experience.

Much like the concept of digital transformation, upgrading legacy OSS/BSS is no easy feat. According to telecoms.com, almost 60% of service providers are only 40% along their BSS/OSS transformation journey. When it comes to refreshing OSS/BSS a lot of work is yet to be done. With many of these systems dating back to the 1980s, it is no surprise that they have become ill-fit for purpose. So when it comes to upgrades and transformation, which methods should service providers adopt?

When asked which approach they favoured, the majority of service providers agreed that a ‘big bang’ approach – whereby legacy systems are swapped out for digital systems in one large project – is the worst approach to OSS/BSS transformation. This is unsurprising given that McKinsey, Forbes and telecoms.com all report that the failure rate of large scale transformation projects is at approximately 70%.

Instead, service providers favour a more pragmatic approach. In joint second place was the greenfield and add-on systems approaches, which both received scores of 3.44 out of 5. A greenfield approach allows service providers to add new digital systems to support new lines of business such as IoT or second brands, while an add-on systems approach enables service providers to add on new digital systems as an overlay to existing legacy systems. This then allows service providers to phase out their legacy systems gradually.

The most popular approach to legacy system upgrades was the phased systems method, whereby service providers take a step-by-step approach to replacing legacy solutions with digital solutions. While there will never be a one-size fits all approach to transformation, it’s clear that pragmatism wins here. These approaches minimize disruption and also allow service providers to reduce and maximize the cost spent on transformation. With service provider margins increasingly slim, the prospect of financial cost savings and minimal disruption is a welcome sign.

Continuous transformation

While many service providers today have a clear understanding of digital transformation’s ultimate goal, the reality is that digital transformation is a continuous journey. Service providers will never be finished with it – it will continuously require new thinking, new advances, change and adaptation. Service providers thinking of digital transformation as a finite journey will struggle to measure their organisation’s success as they focus their aims on an unachievable digital transformation utopia.

Digital transformation represents major upheaval – and even inconvenience – but without it, service providers won’t be able to keep up with the pace of change. They must transform to survive, and that starts within their organisations – with their culture, their processes and their existing network infrastructure. But adopting the right approach is key and service providers need not make digital transformation scarier than it already is by embarking on large-scale, lengthy transformation projects that reap few rewards. It is only through the adoption of a tactical, pragmatic and step-by-step approach to transformation that service providers will be able to evolve and, ultimately, start monetizing the multi-billion digital services revenue opportunity.

 

openet-martin-morgan-BWMartin Morgan is the VP Marketing at Openet. With 25 years’  experience in mobile communications software, Martin has worked in mobile billing software since the early days of the industry. In that time he’s spoken at over 50 telecoms conferences worldwide and had a similar number of articles published in the telecoms trade press and served on trade association and company boards. At Openet Martin is responsible for marketing thought leadership and market interaction.

Telecoms.com Annual Industry Survey 2018

Welcome to the 2018 edition of the Telecoms.com Intelligence Annual Industry Survey report. The findings from our signature survey continue to provide insights and foresight into the dynamic telecoms industry.

Once again well over 1,000 industry professionals from a broad array of backgrounds responded to the survey with their first-hand experience as well as their perspective views on the current status and future trends of the industry. As our customary practice, the report started with an overall industry landscape before we delved into six key areas pertinent to today’s telecoms industry: NFV, 5G, IoT, Digital Transformation, Security, and Test & Monitoring.

A few key findings from the survey:

  • 75% felt positive about the telecoms industry’s business outlook for 2019
  • 79% believed NFV is critical to their companies overall strategy
  • 61% believed emerging technologies and services are critical to telecom’s long-term success
  • 75% saw digital transformation as very important

Fill in the short form below to download your free copy now.

By downloading a copy of this report the information which you provide will be shared with the sponsor(s) for informative purposes and your mutual interest in the subject matter or similar subject matter (including initial follow-up regarding the content of this report).

Amdocs and Openet settle baffling, endless patent dispute

After eight years of ensuring expensive holidays for their lawyers, rival telecoms software companies Amdocs and Openet have decided to call it a draw.

An extremely short announcement from Amdocs said “Amdocs and Openet today announced that they have settled a patent infringement dispute in the United States Federal District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.  As part of the confidential settlement, Amdocs agreed to license certain patents to Openet.”

Back in 2010 youthful Light Reading hack Ray Le Maistre spoke to (then and still) Openet CEO Niall Norton in a bid to find out what Amdocs’ problem was. Norton, however, seemed to be as baffled as everyone else by this act of unilateral legal aggression and chose to conclude that it was merely a measure of how intimidated Amdocs was by the plucky Irish BSS upstart.

“[Amdocs] is a good company and a ferocious competitor,” said Norton at the time. “It’s good to know they’re thinking about us as much as we’re thinking about them. We’re open-minded about what might happen next. Our lawyers say this could take anything between three and 12 months to sort out.”

That’s what they always say Niall and then, before you know it, eight years have gone past and they’re the only ones with any cash. To be fair the case does seem to be especially arcane. A spot of light Googling revealed one case that was apparently resolved in 2016 and another that came to a conclusion a month or so ago. Both accounts seem like very effective cures for insomnia but we don’t feel any more enlightened about the merits and outcome of this litigatiathon as a result of enduring them.

In essence Amdocs accused Openet of infringing on some of its patents and the fact that Openet is now going to shell out some license fees would seem to vindicate it to some degree. But if we assume Amdocs’ intention was at the very least to force Openet to entirely abandon the technology in question, and maybe even to force it out of business, then the case seems to have been a failure.

Openet finds people are losing their faith in OTTs

Research commissioned by BSS vendor Openet found the Facebook data scandal has affected overall trust in digital service providers.

Just over half of the 1,500 people surveyed in the US, UK, Brazil and Philippines said they were less likely to share their data with an OTT (i.e. big internet company) as a result of the data scandal that hit Facebook with the Cambridge Analytica revelations. This trend also applied to free digital services in general as people have apparently got the memo that companies don’t just give stuff away without expecting something in return.

Openet’s narrative is that this represents an opportunity for operators to present themselves as a more trustworthy source of digital products and services. We had a chat with Openet CEO Niall Norgan and he described a potential role for operators as the providers of a seal of trustworthiness equivalent to ‘fair trade’ labels on consumer goods.

“Until now, digital service companies like Netflix or Uber have been held up as the poster children for delivering personalised digital experiences and services,” said Norgan. “But it seems some have been a little too liberal in their use of consumer data, ruining the party for everyone.

“Since the Facebook data scandal, consumer attitudes towards digital service companies and personal data have eroded, with some consumers even deleting accounts in protest. In fact, many have expressed an interest in paying for services if it means that their data won’t be abused, signifying an end to the ‘freemium’ era. Consumers are clearly screaming out for something different, something trustworthy.”

Of course Openet has a vested interest in this narrative. It has been undergoing a strategic pivot over the past couple of years to position itself as the vendor operators can turn to if they want to do something about the OTT threat. Norgan explained that billing itself isn’t the strategic play it once was and that operators need to get better at things like analysing data and partnering with other digital service providers to get with the times.

“Mobile operators have traditionally had a much more conservative approach in their use of subscriber data, despite having an abundance of it,” said Norgan. “For a long time, this conservative approach to data use has been used as an unfavourable measure for operators’ digital efforts, especially in comparison to other digital-first companies.

“But times are changing and it’s clear that consumers expect more if they are to hand over personal data in exchange for services. Mobile operators have earned the right to answer this call. But to be successful, they must learn from the mistakes made by social media and digital service companies alike. Transparency around data collection and opt-in processes are now top priorities for consumers. Operators must bear this in mind when seizing new digital opportunities.”

Here’s a summary of some of the findings from the report. Even if they deliver everything they claim, vendors like Openet can only take operators part of the way. They’re still wrestling with colossal cultural inertia and creating new digital services is never going to be a core competence. But the trust angle does seem to have some legs, if only operators can work out how to exploit it, but in a good way.

Openet OTT survey

Bringing BSS/OSS into the new age – it’s now or never

Telecoms.com periodically invites third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this piece Tony Gillick, VP Solutions Management at Openet, urges the industry to transform its approach to BSS and OSS before it’s too late.

TM Forum’s recent launch of its Open Digital Architecture is good news for the industry. It captures a lot of the good work that has already taken place and sets out a blueprint for the digital transformation of BSS and OSS.

Today’s service providers know they need to change if they are to keep up with the pace at which the industry is moving. But with ever-decreasing ARPU, and the race to free data underway, they don’t have the luxury of embarking on lengthy, hugely expensive transformation programs to get their BSS and OSS stacks up to speed. Instead, they need an API-driven open architecture that enables them to get away from vendor lock-in and having to deal with inflexible, large vendors who will deliver projects and upgrade software on their terms.

The bleak reality is that if operators are to survive in the face of rising competition from web-scale companies, it’s now or never to make that change happen, so what does that look like for operators willing to transform?

Become the model for change

BSS/OSS have been around since the start of the cellular business in the 1980s, and that’s where the problems begin for today’s operators. Throughout the years, operators have built up a complex burg of legacy systems and processes, which are not only no longer fit for purpose but also nothing short of a nightmare to overhaul.

For operators, transforming OSS/BSS begins in two ways. First, with overhauling traditional commercial models, which have become slow to move and very inflexible. These commercial models are no longer fit to serve the agile world in which we live, one where subscribers want everything now, on-demand.

Today’s operators need new commercial models that are driven by short-term goals and that do away with the old, lengthy, never-ending service contracts that look at transformation projects over several years, instead of months or even weeks.

The second way in which transformation can happen is through new delivery models. It’s no secret that web-scale companies’ agility is beyond that of operators. But this need not be the case; by harnessing new processes and technologies such as DevOps and microservices, operators can replicate the agility of Internet companies. It is only through this open, innovative and experimental approach that operators will start to compete with the big OTT players.

By overhauling commercial and delivery models, operators will not only be able to boost their rate of innovation, but they’ll also see the industry-wide issue of vendor lock-in disappear. As the industry moves towards open technologies which proliferate the use of DevOps and Open APIs, fewer vendors will be able to tie down operators to lengthy contracts that provide little in the way of innovation and experimentation.

Setting operator priorities straight

But making change happen isn’t just about technical capabilities, it also requires a shift in mind-sets and priorities, particularly when it comes to the deployment of new services such as 5G and IoT. Although the race to 5G is well and truly on, the state of affairs for operators today implies that perhaps it shouldn’t warrant such urgency.

Operators’ resources are stretched and, where subscribers are concerned, the pressure is on to be better and do better – this means, selling a wider variety of personalised digital services. While 5G and IoT will undoubtedly bring about a wealth of applications that will benefit operators, neither of these technologies will bring about immediate ROI. It’s important, therefore, that operators invest their efforts in laying the foundations to not only ensure their survival today, but to be able to support the technologies of tomorrow, and that starts with changing the way they approach OSS/BSS.

A greenfield approach to OSS/BSS

Adopting the correct technologies will be the key to unlocking the OSS/BSS treasure chest. Operators should approach transformation with a greenfield attitude – that is, to start afresh, with no legacy systems or culture and to adopt a “digital first, customer first” approach. And this does not mean that existing large-scale transformation projects should be abandoned, instead, new greenfield approaches mean operators can run these in parallel to the current legacy stack being transformed.

This greenfield approach promotes the switch from hardware and software stacks to real-time, automated digital platforms. These digital platforms can see operators launch services in as little as 14-weeks whilst still going ahead with their longer-term transformation projects. By using these platforms, operators can leverage a modular, API-driven approach and select which service or “platform component” they need, on an ad-hoc basis. This promotes faster service delivery but also reduces the cost attached to digital transformation.

Most importantly, this open, best of breed, platform approach is the antithesis of big vendor lock-in. By drawing on open technologies, promoted through the use of open APIs, operators will be better suited to encourage partnerships and the collaboration and sharing of technologies within these. Not only will this reduce OSS/BSS cost and implementation timescales, it will also prevent mega-vendors from selling services from a single supplier.

Ultimately, it is this openness that will promote innovation in the telecoms industry and that will see OSS/BSS become the systems operators need to succeed in this ever-evolving, digital world.

Digital Transformation: just a bump in the road

There’s no doubt that digital transformation is hard, and it’s clear that few operators know where to begin. But the solution lies in this greenfield attitude; by starting anew, with no pre-conceptions or notions in mind, operators can leverage experimentation to roll out new services that may have otherwise taken years to deploy.

It is this provision of tools – namely the platforms, new technologies, APIs – by vendors that will encourage operators to innovate, and will see the challenges associated with digital transformation soon fade into the telco past.

 

openet-Tony-GillickTony is VP Solutions Management at Openet. He’s been designing and deploying BSS for over 15 years and is responsible for direction and deployment strategy for Openet Digital Business Platform.

Openet calls on the power of Frykhammar

Irish BSS vendor Openet has nailed a high profile addition to its board of directors in former Ericsson CFO and CEO Jan Frykhammar.

Long-time CFO and super-sub CEO in the period between Vestberg and Ekholm, Frykhammar has pretty impeccable credentials in the telecoms vendor world. He was eventually purged in Ekholm’s changing of the guard and the only knock you could have on his experience is that pretty much all of it was acquired at Ericsson, so he may be a tad institutionalised.

“We are delighted to be welcoming such an accomplished and well-respected telecoms leader onto the board of directors,” said Openet CEO Niaill Norton. “Having been an invaluable member of the executive team at Ericsson, Jan has in-depth insight to the changes needed for vendors and operators alike during this period of industry transformation.

“With digital now a critical requirement, all BSS vendors must adapt their business models to put the evolving needs of operators first, and develop a profit model that is symbiotic. This, unfortunately, is far from the broken model we have today. With Jan on-board, I hope we can continue to disrupt the industry and provide operators with an alternative approach to digital BSS.”

“Openet is making real strides in supporting operators with a new fresh way of thinking around digital transformations, and I am privileged to join the company’s board of directors at such a critical point in its growth,” said Frykhammar. “Having worked in the telecoms industry for almost 30 years, I hope to support the great Openet team to deliver on its high growth aspirations as well as defining winning strategies.

“Openet’s message of changing the game is right. The industry needs to change and I look forward to working closely with Niall, and the whole Openet team, to continue to drive disruption through innovation and delivering value for customers and stakeholders.”

To be honest we’re still not sure how much value Board Directors actually add. They seem a bit like Executive Producers of films – brought in mainly for the cache of their name and reputation rather than what they will contribute on a day-to-day basis. But that may not always be the case and if we give Openet the benefit of the doubt in this instance, Frykhammar could be a significant addition.

Taking the BS out of BSS

Conversations at MWC 2018 with a couple of telecoms vendors reveal a more pragmatic, bespoke approach to doing business.

One manifestation of this is a tendency to move away from telecoms-specific vernacular to the language of the broader tech industry. So we no longer use defensive, them-and-us language like OTTs to describe internet companies and vendors such as Openet and Amdocs seems to be avoiding categorising their offerings along traditional lines such as BSS, in favour of the more customer-centric language of ‘solutions’.

Niall Norton, CEO of Openet, has been banging this drum for a while. He is trying to bring the kind of customer-centricity we associate with companies like Amazon to the telecoms B2B space by introducing greater flexibility to his offerings. The ultimate purpose of this seems to be to enable CSP customers to buy only what they need, when they need it.

In many ways this is counter-intuitive in an industry that has historically aimed for ‘vendor lock-in’, by selling massive end-to-end packages that make the customer umbilically dependent on the vendor indefinitely, for fear or the disruption that starting again with someone else will cause. The dependency creates the opportunity to charge high margin servicing and consulting fees whenever the CSP wants to change or upgrade anything.

But Norton’s bright idea is that by offering more bespoke packages he not only lowers the barriers to entry for making any kind of sale, but the CSP will hopefully end up spending more down the line when the business benefits of what they have already bought prove themselves.

Over at Amdocs the big news there is the recent acquisition of video-on-demand specialist Vubiquity, which only completed a few days before the start of the show. The most intriguing aspect of this piece of M&A was the clear statement of intent by Amdocs to cater to a growing trend in its core market: multiplay.

Operators all over the world are investing heavily in video provision and premium content to add spice and stickiness to their communications bundles. As we found when speaking to Vubiquity CEO Darcy Antonellis (pictured), the thinking behind the move is to put more tools at the disposal of its customers, and also to do so in a modular and flexible way to enable them to get to market faster.

Your average operator isn’t going to go toe-to-toe with Netflix or Amazon when it comes to on-demand video (one possible exception being AT&T if it ever completes its acquisition of Time Warner). But that doesn’t mean they can’t offer some genuinely valuable video services to end users, perhaps focusing more on niche and long-tail offerings and helping with their discovery.

Antonellis is now the GM of Amdocs’ newly-created media division, which further illustrate the strategic importance Amdocs is putting on servicing this area. She is a veteran on the broadcast and video industries and intends to confer some of that expertise onto the operator channel. Again, the emphasis will be on trying to deliver bespoke offerings, tailored to the unique business opportunities identified by each customer.

In keeping with the broader theme of this year’s show, the telecoms industry seems to be finally moving from the hype phase of the cycle towards seriously looking as business cases for the new opportunities we’ve been hearing about for so long. If vendors want operators to become more agile in order to take on the internet giants then their offerings need to match that. On the evidence of Openet and Amdocs at least, that seems to be exactly what they’re doing.