The First Network Slice Trial for Intelligent Manufacturing: How does the value of 5G reflect?

Recently, together with Zhejiang Branch of China Telecom and Zhejiang Bluetron, ZTE announced the successful commission of the first “5G Slicing + MEC + Intelligent Manufacturing” project in China, which will undoubtedly serve as a good example for the application of 5G in the manufacturing industry.

It seems that it is one of the areas that 5G has been exploring in the vertical industry this year. ZTE believes that this is the first project to apply 5G E2E network slicing technology to intelligent manufacturing scenarios in China, which has a unique significance for building 5G smart factories in various industries. To the telecom operators, it is also an important exploration targeting to the enterprise market.

5G implementation is the key issue

5G is not only the “popular star” in public, but also attracts the interests of users in various industries with its outstanding features of eMBB, URLLC and mMTC. How to introduce 5G to drive the business change and innovation, and make 5G a reality, are the common topics among telecommunication industry and vertical industries.

Therefore, the successful execution of this project is critical. The high-definition video streams for industrial production systems (such as Red Lion Cement feed inlet) is taken by BlueTron with its industrial cameras, and then transmitted to the industrial vision analysis system in real time via 5G network. The industrial vision analysis system, which is deployed on the MEC servers, conducts AI-based intelligent video analysis of the video streams. The abnormal in the production system, such as feed inlet congestion, can be automatically identified and alerted.

Network slicing is crucial in this project to ensure the large upstream bandwidth and high security isolation required by industrial vision scenarios. Vision analysis system is deployed on the MEC servers to provide nearby processing and ensure the low latency and high security. ZTE, Zhejiang Branch of China Telecom and BlueTron collaborated closely to provide a dedicated eMBB network slice and the MEC edge cloud platform for manufacturing enterprises. BlueTron’s cloud intelligent vision analysis system is loaded on the platform. In this project, not only the automatic monitoring and management of the production process are realized, but also the production data security is ensured since “data stays inside the factory” throughout the whole process.

The network supports multiple video streams uploading from various terminals at a speed of 20Mbps each and a delay around 20ms, which meet the current needs of industrial visual inspection in the feed inlet of Red Lion cement production line. This requirement for upstream rate is not very high and can be guaranteed preferentially through RAN resources scheduling supported by network slicing technology. With the further improvement of video resolution and bit rate of machine vision, as well as the increasing of monitoring point of industrial cameras in the future, the demand for 5G upstream bandwidth will be further increased. Independent frequency bands can be allocated in that stage and also the frame structure with higher up-ratio can be used to improve the utilization efficiency of RAN resources.

The video surveillance for production lines in traditional factories adopt wired connection solution, and a large number of cables are used, resulting in a complex internal structure of the factory, which cannot meet the needs of flexible production for future digital society. The adoption of 5G slicing solution makes it possible for wireless technology to replace wired, so that to easily build the flexible workshops and wireless factories, and promote intelligent manufacturing finally. That’s the meaning of this project.

Smart factories need 5G to do more

Currently, the project is mainly used for industrial vision detection, which is a common scenario in the intelligent manufacturing industry. In essence, it is the achievement of intelligent detection in industrial production environment through 5G network, by which the human visual is extended, empowered by the AI-based vision analysis system.

The current service flow of industrial vision inspection is still an open ring. In the future, it will be combined with the control flow to form a completely closed-loop automatic control system. 5G network will support seamless combination of eMBB service in upstream and URLLC service in downstream. Therefore, 5G low latency technology will play an important role in the future.

It is known that 5G eMBB network slicing technology is relatively mature and ready for commercial use. But the multi-dimensional charging of slices and business models need to be further explored in practice. The 5G URLLC slicing technology is expected to be commercially available by the year of 2021 after the accomplishment of relative standards in 2020.

Smart factories need 5G to do more. 5G technology will accelerate the transformation of intelligent manufacturing. “Internet of Things” of the workshops will be achieved by networking of the production equipment; production decisions are made based on the big data analysis with the production data visualization; the efficient and green manufacturing can be achieved when the production documents are paperless; the intelligent factory “neural” system can be created by the transparency in production process; and with the unmanned production site, the unmanned factory will be actually realized.

The 5G+ industrial internet can be applied in all the processes of the production, management and supply chains to help manufacturing enterprises in their transformation upgrading, reduce the cost, improve the enterprise informatization and competitiveness, evolving towards wireless, automated, intelligent, and flexible manufacturing.

For example, the 5G-based machine vision inspection, by the industrial cameras and edge computing gateway deployed in the production line, the video can be automatically processed, recognized and labeled, avoiding human error and mis-checking. All the units support on-demand, fast and flexibly wireless networking. This will greatly improve the qualification rate of the products. The scope of detectable applications in the equipment manufacturing industry will be expanded by more than 30% and the detection accuracy will be increased by 200%.

Digital transformation is just in time

On June 6, 2019, China’s MIIT (Ministry of Industry and Information Technology) issued 5G licenses to four major Chinese telecom operators, which means that the 5G era is officially open in China. Unlike previous generations of wireless technology, 5G will not only focus on upgrading in the public market, but also enter the vertical industries and build infrastructures for the digital transformation of the verticals. Miao Wei, the Minister of MIIT recently spoke at a press conference of the State Administration that, 80% of the 5G application scenarios will be on the industrial internet in the future.

The China Information and Communications Research Institute previously released the report “5G Industrial Economy Contribution”, which predicted that the information consumption driven by 5G commercialization in China from 2020 to 2025, directly driving the total economic output to CNY10.6 trillion ($1.5 trillion), and indirectly pull of the total economic output to about CNY24.8 trillion ($3.5 trillion). 5G will directly create more than 3 million jobs in China.

The digital transformation of the industry is the trend. We are currently on the eve of large-scale digital upgrading of the industry. The digital technology innovation will improve productivity and work environments by automation and intelligence of the production process. 5G networks are indispensable during such intelligent changes in manufacturing and digital transformation in vertical industries.

Industry scenario differentiation is very large. New demand, new business, new models are continually emerging. Compared to the B2C market, B2B market has the basic characteristics of fragmentation and high barriers. Expanding to the B2B market is a new topic for operators. Operators need to work closely with leading enterprises and solution providers in various industries in order to understand the needs of the industrial scenarios and transform them into network slice templates and form the B2B business models which are replicable, promotable, and profitable. ZTE believes that 5G will expand the market share for operators in the tide of digital transformation, and achieve sustainable growth of the telecommunications industry.

China switches on 5G

The world’s largest mobile market has gone live with its 5G networks, and is poised to become the largest 5G market in the world.

Very much in the same way as the South Korean operators did back in April, all three of China’s incumbent telecom operators switched their 5G networks on the same day. The simultaneous inauguration was held in Beijing on Thursday and was graced by the presence of officials of the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT), the government body overseeing telecoms.

“The commercial launch of 5G is an ideal opportunity to quicken the steps to infrastructure development, including AI and IoT,” said Chen Zhaoxiong, the vice minister of MIIT, as was reported by Xinhua, one of China’s major official propaganda outlets. Chen also highlighted the importance of 5G working in collaboration with other vertical industries, including manufacturing, transport, energy, and agriculture. He also sees 5G playing a key role in promoting innovations in education, health care, government service, and smart cities.

Since four licences were awarded in June, over 80,000 5G base stations have been built, half of them belong to China Mobile. The world’s largest mobile operator by subscribers are going to offer 5G services in 50 cities, including all the major cities across the country, according to its press release. The company claimed it has already launched 44 5G devices since it received the licence, 13 of them already in the market (10 smartphones and 3 CPEs).

China Telecom, the world’s largest integrated operator by subscribers, will also start offering 5G services in 50 cities. The names were not spelled out in the press release, but it would be a surprise if they were the same 50 as China Mobile. In addition to talking about new experience offered by 5G in cloud-based gaming and HD video, the operator also stressed 5G+Cloud+AI offers to industry customers, including industrial internet, smart cities, smart medical care, smart education, transport and logistics, and smart energy.

China Unicom does not give a specific number of cities its 5G service will cover, though earlier the company announced that it will share RAN with China Telecom in 15 cities, as well as build its own 5G networks in 14 additional cities as well as extending to 8 other provinces. So, the total number of cities covered by Unicom 5G should be comparable with the other two.

Absent from the launch is China Broadcasting Network Corporation Ltd, the licenced greenfield operator.

South Korea is the largest 5G subscriber market so far, but thanks to the sheer size of the Chinese market, even with lower penetration China is expected to overtake South Korea and the US to become the world’s largest 5G market. GSMA, the industry lobby group, estimates China will have 600 million 5G subscribers by 2025, about 40% of the global 5G market.

Vodafone Business and América Móvil team up to woo IoT customers

The B2B group of Vodafone has entered a partnership agreement with América Móvil to provide IoT operators with international roaming service for things.

The press release does disclose much detail on how Vodafone Business and América Móvil will combine their IoT platforms or share their expertise in IoT connectivity and services with each other, for example if this would involve the two platforms running the same applications or adopting the same protocols. Instead, the statement stays high-level, claiming the partnership between the two companies will “make it easier than ever for customers to connect devices globally.”

“With this agreement we further extend our IoT global footprint by partnering with one of Latin America’s strongest players,” said Vinod Kumar, CEO of Vodafone Business. “América Móvil´s coverage and expertise across Latin America will help us support our global customers in a part of the world where we have seen a surge in IoT adoption.”

“In América Móvil we believe in win-win partnerships that benefit our customers,” added Marco Quatorze, Director of Value Added Service at América Móvil. “We are excited about the partnership with Vodafone Business that provides our joint customers with the best user experience of two leading technology providers.”

Vodafone Business has been actively engaged in improving its IoT offers. The company claimed its IoT platform is connecting 89 million devices worldwide. However, even assuming all these connections on cellular-based, it would still be a small fraction of the global total of 1.0 billion Cellular IoT according to the latest (June 2019) Ericsson Mobility Report.

Therefore, the tie-up with América Móvil may indeed become a win-win partnership. Vodafone Business’ own research has shown that the Americas are the market, and transport and logistics the sectors that IoT has seen the fast growth. These are a natural fit for “roaming service” for things, which would enable tracking, monitoring, and optimising of routes for goods to continue even if the cargo has left the coverage of one operator, and in this case, moving from one continent to another.

For América Móvil, better known for its consumer service (the company says it is connecting 362 million access lines) but also becoming more active in serving business customers, the partnership with Vodafone Business will help it expand the footprint to Vodafone territories in Western and South Europe (in Europe, América Móvil operates in Austria and six Eastern European and Balkan countries). Additionally, it may also enable América Móvil to leverage Vodafone’s technology solutions.

At the beginning of the year, Vodafone Business announced a $550 million joint managed service deal with IBM that also covers 5G, AI, and other advanced technologies. Kone, the Finland-based lift company and existing Vodafone customer, has expressed interest in the IoT capability of that new “joint venture”.

Indian government bails out BSNL

It turns out that state-owned operator BSNL isn’t very efficient, but the Indian government reckons merging it with even less efficient MTNL should sort things out.

That’s the cunning plan recently unveiled by Indian Telecoms Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad, according to reports and Twitter (see below).  BSNL, which has over 100 million subscribers, will be merged with MTNL, which has three million. It’s not known whether they will pick a new, unhelpfully vowel-free abbreviation for the combined effort.

On top of the merger they will apparently have 350 billion rupees chucked at them (if we have understood crore correctly), which is around 5 billion bucks. In return they will have to ‘monetize’ a similar value of assets held by the two companies. Various other chunks of cash are being mentioned in reports, so it’s hard to pin down the precise size of the bailout, but it’s substantial. On top of all that MTNL alone seems to have accumulated around 200 billion rupees in debt, which is a good effort.

“Neither BSNL/MTNL is being closed, nor are they being disinvested, nor are they being hived off to any third party,” Prasad is quoted as saying. “With all these measures, I’m confident, BSNL will become EBITDA positive in the next two years.” They’re also getting a bunch of 4G spectrum to help with the great turnaround, and will be offering thousands of employees voluntary redundancy.

The concept of a state-run telco is a pretty anachronistic one and it’s not at all surprising to hear BSNL and MTNL are struggling in the fiercely competitive Indian market. Apart from the expensive streamlining it’s not at all obvious what a state bail-out will achieve other than keeping them on life support a bit longer and we wouldn’t be surprised if this is a fairly contentious move.

KT boasts of 1mn 5G subs and European roaming deals

KT has announced its 5G subscriber base has gone past the one million mark and it has entered into 5G roaming agreements with operators in Italy, Switzerland, and Finland.

KT, South Korea’s second largest operator, announced that it has won one million 5G subscribers five months after the service was launched, and one month after its competitor, SK Telecom, the country’s biggest operator, hit the milestone.

Meanwhile, KT has also reached 5G roaming agreements with TIM in Italy, Sunrise in Switzerland, and Elisa in Finland. This means that KT’s 5G subscribers will be able to use the 5G networks provided by those three operators in the three European countries.

KT has standing agreements with operators in 185 countries for 3G and LTE roaming. The operator aims to extend those agreements to 5G when 5G services go live in those countries. Prior to the agreements with the three European countries, KT had already set up a similar agreement with China Mobile, despite the fact it hasn’t launched services yet.

According to KT’s price proposals at the time of 5G launch, customers on the starting package (paying KRW 55,000, or $46 per month) will have 8 GB roaming data while overseas, with the speed capped at 1 Mbps. Those on higher tiers (paying KRW 80,000 ($67) or KRW 100,000 ($84) per month) will have unlimited roaming data, but the speed will be capped at 100 Kbps. Customers on the premium tier of the 5G service (KRW 130,000, or $109, per month) will have the speed limited lifted to 3 Mbps.

KT is not the first South Korean operator to tie 5G roaming partnerships. SK Telecom 5G subscribers will be able to connect to Swisscom while travelling in Switzerland, while those on LG U+ will be able to connect to China Unicom’s 5G when travelling to its neighbouring country, after the latter’s 5G service goes live.

The only catch for KT 5G users intending to visit Europe is that the roaming can only be done on Samsung Galaxy S10 5G, the vendor’s first 5G smartphone, though KT said the service will be extended to other devices soon. Earlier this month, at IFA in Berlin, Samsung announced that it had already sold 2 million 5G smartphones and expected to double the volume to 4 million by the end of the year.

Huawei pledges $1.5 billion to its new developer program

Huawei has announced that it will invest $1.5 billion in the next five years to boost its developer ecosystem for the Kunpeng and Ascend computing platforms.

SDKs were also released at the same event when its Developer Program 2.0 was unveiled.The announcement was made at the 2019 version of the Chinese vendor’s annual Huawei Connect event in Shanghai. According to Patrick Zhang, CTO of Cloud & AI Products & Services at Huawei, the new program will cover five key areas:

  • Building an open computing industry ecosystem based on Kunpeng + Ascend computing processors
  • Establishing an all-round enablement system
  • Promoting the development of industry standards, specifications, demonstration sites, and technical certification system
  • Building industry-specific application ecosystems and region-specific industry ecosystems
  • Sharing Kunpeng and Ascend computing power, making it available to every developer

The focus areas are related to cloud computing and artificial intelligence. The applications and services the ecosystem aims to support are for server level, either in the centralized cloud or on the edge. To enable the ecosystem development, Huawei also published Kunpeng Developer Kit and ModelArts 2.0 AI development platform.

Despite that x86 architecture is still dominating the server market, ARM has worked to break the monopoly, and Huawei is one of ARM’s leading licensees. Earlier this year Huawei released Kunpeng 920, its CPU based on ARMv8 design. Huawei aims to expand its share in the server market with Kunpeng’s superior computing power claimed by Huawei, most likely starting from the market in China.

But Huawei’s ambitions go way beyond moving more boxes. Its cloud service has been promoted for its strong AI capability, supported by the Ascend AI chips. The Ascend 910, the latest version, was released in August, which the company claimed is the world’s most powerful AI processor.

By enriching its ecosystems, Huawei hopes it will be able to deliver a full suite of solutions, including supporting digital transformation undertake by increasing numbers of telecom operators.

This is the second iteration of Huawei’s Developer Program. The Developer Program 1.0 was launched in 2015.

China Telecom and China Unicom jointly build and share 5G RAN

China Telecom and China Unicom, two of China’s three leading telecom operators, and two of its four 5G licensees, will jointly cover parts of the country with one shared 5G radio access network.

The two companies, both listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange, signed the “Framework Agreement on Co-building and Co-sharing 5G Networks” on Monday. According to the Agreement, the two operators, by sharing the radio spectrums to their names, will “build together” and “share together” one 5G radio access network in 15 major cities, including Beijing, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Guangzhou, etc. The 5G core networks will be built separately.

The Agreement also laid out the plan on how to divide the work between the two in the cities they will share the network. Territories each will cover is divided roughly based on the number of 4G base stations. For example, in Beijing, China Telecom will build 40% of the 5G base stations, while in Shanghai it will build 60%. Each company will be responsible for investing in, maintaining, and operating the base stations it builds. The Agreement also commits “non-aggression” between the partners, for example, collaboration with third parties by one partner should not harm the interest of the other partner. Details of revenue settlement in the shared networks will be worked out later.

On top of that, the two companies will build their own separate 5G networks in other parts of the country. China Telecom’s own network will extend to 19 provinces, while China Unicom’s will cover 10.

The two operators, together with China Mobile, the world’s largest mobile operator by subscriber numbers, and China Broadcasting Network Corporation Ltd, were all awarded 5G licences in June, well ahead of what the industry had expected.

Pai gobbles up Sprint and T-Mobile US merger

After months of headaches and sleepless nights, the tides of favour seem to be turning for Sprint and T-Mobile US as the FCC chief gives his blessing for the union.

254 days into the 180 days the FCC gives itself to approve mergers, FCC Chairman Ajit Pai has officially confirmed his position. It is still not quite 100% guaranteed for the two telcos, however with Pai’s recommendation, the future is looking very rosier.

“After one of the most exhaustive merger reviews in Commission history, the evidence conclusively demonstrates that this transaction will bring fast 5G wireless service to many more Americans and help close the digital divide in rural areas,” Pai said in a statement.

“Moreover, with the conditions included in this draft Order, the merger will promote robust competition in mobile broadband, put critical mid-band spectrum to use, and bring new competition to the fixed broadband market.”

Suggesting this was a protracted and painful process might be one of the biggest understatements of the year. However, it might have been necessary considering the significant impact a merger of this scale could potential have on competition, diversification and network deployment across the US.

Above all else, the US is a monstrous market with an incredibly small number of nationwide telcos. This does of course offer economy of scale to improve investment capabilities, though there is a risk of regional monopolies due to the sheer size and geographical variance across the country. Proposed mergers which would take the number of national telcos from four to three has been extinguished in the past, though this one has passed almost every test.

The greenlight from the FCC Chairman is an important step, adding momentum to positive news from the Department of Justice in the last few weeks. At the end of July, the DoJ’s antitrust division gave the thumbs up, assuming Sprint’s prepaid brand Boost is divested, and Pai has made the same demands.

This is one concession which many expected, but we have major issue with. Dish will acquire the Boost brand, allowing it to make use of its horde of valuable spectrum, satisfying the demands, though will this be enough to maintain the current levels of competition, the objective of both the FCC and DoJ? We do not believe so.

Firstly, instead of having four established telcos in the US, consumers will now have to choose from three telcos and a newbie with zero experience of effectively running a mobile business and network. Dish does not have the competence, experience, infrastructure, processes, billing systems or supply chain to run a mobile business, and it will take years to build these elements to the degree expected.

Secondly, Dish is now an MVNO. It will be able to make use of the T-Mobile network, but the FCC and DoJ has replaced a functional MNO with an MVNO and expects no-one to notice the difference. Both of these agencies expect Dish to have its own network up-and-running in a few years, but this is another ridiculous ambition.

As mentioned in the first point, this is a company which is not practiced in the dark arts of mobile. The three remaining traditional players took decades to rollout their own networks, and they are still not genuine nationwide telcos (there are still network gaps across the country). How is Dish expected to create a nationwide, 4G and 5G, network across a country of 9.8 million km2, with an incredibly variety of different urban densities, geographical landscapes and economic societies.

If anyone thinks Dish is going to be a replacement which can maintain the current status quo, they are quite frankly fooling themselves.

What is worth noting is that this is not the end of the road for Sprint and T-Mobile. It might have secured the relevant regulatory approval, but now it will have to combat the various legal challenges.

Led by New York Attorney General Letitia James, a coalition of State Attorney Generals have filed a lawsuit to block the proposed merger. The lawyers are arguing the merger would harm competition, and it should be blocked to maintain the status quo. As it stands, with four separate MNOs challenging each other, prices and mobile experience is improving for the consumer; the lawyers are arguing that the situation is not broken, it is in fact improving, so why should the FCC and DoJ try to fix an imaginary problem?

Although the approval process from the DoJ and FCC might have been considered a significant problem, the telcos will not have to face legal heavyweights from more than a dozen States. Lawyers have a way of being very difficult when they want to be, so there might well be a few more twists and turns in this saga.

Verizon sues City of Rochester over 5G fees

US telco Verizon has filed a lawsuit against the City of Rochester, suggesting a newly created telecommunications code violates federal law and the maximum fees telcos can be charged.

Filed in the District Court for Western New York, Verizon’s lawyers will be attempting to argue that the implementation of the new telecommunications code by the city will prohibit the rollout of 5G technologies in the area. This is of course early days, though it could go some way in creating legal precedent throughout the US.

Using FCC rules which were passed last September, Verizon will argue the newly adopted telecommunications code in the City of Rochester violates the maximum fee of $270 a year which can be charged by the local governments. Although we were unable to figure out how much each site could cost Verizon annually, it does appear to run into the thousands.

“To better serve its customers and the City and to begin to serve new customers and provide new services, Verizon Wireless seeks to extend, densify, and upgrade its wireless network infrastructure, including to install additional Small Wireless Facilities to support the provision of current and next-generation telecommunications services such as 5G and to deploy fiber to connect these facilities,” the filing states.

“To successfully do this, Verizon Wireless requires new approvals from Defendant to access City property.

“As a result of Defendant’s actions, Verizon Wireless has been, and will continue to be, damaged and irreparably harmed absent the relief requested herein. The harm caused by Defendant’s unlawful actions includes, but is not limited to, an effective prohibition on Verizon Wireless’s ability to provide telecommunications services in the affected area of the City.”

Similar to regulatory changes in the UK with the new Electronic Communications Code, the FCC is attempting to protect the interests of the telcos. As real-estate owners know the telcos have no choice but to increase the number of cell sites to provide the promised 5G experience to consumers, they are in a position of power. The new rules from the FCC, and the creation of the $270 annual limit, is supposed to create a responsible transaction which benefits both parties.

However, it does not appear the City of Rochester agrees with the position of the FCC. In creating its own telecommunications code, it does appear higher fees can be charged for cell sites, while some officials state they are attempting to reduce potential clutter and eyesores created by the additional mobile infrastructure.

Looking at the timeline, Verizon wrote to city officials to ask for revisions to the code on January 10 and February 7, before the code was enacted on February 20 without any amendments, taking effect on April 1. Another letter was sent on April 15 questioning whether the code was compliant with federal law, with city officials finally responding on April 30 suggesting they were happy with the set-up. On July 30, the city officials demanded payment from the telco.

In short, Verizon is claiming the fees are acting as a prohibitor to the delivery of connectivity in the city, therefore federal law is being violated.

What is worth noting, that due to the focus on mmWave for the delivery of 5G services in the US, more cell sites will have to be deployed. This is unavoidable, as to deliver the higher speed promised by 5G, higher-frequency airwaves will have to be utilised. This does not appear to be a problem, however coverage distance will have to be sacrificed leading to the densification plans set-forward by the telcos.

Although this is the first lawsuit of this nature which has been brought to our attention, we suspect there are numerous other local governments attempting to sweat public assets to secure more funding. This is one of the first, but this might become quite a common lawsuit to read about over the coming months and years, as densification strategies gather momentum.

China reportedly warns India not to ban Huawei from 5G

China has told India not to exclude Huawei from its upcoming 5G trials, or Indian businesses will face retaliations, Reuters reports.

Quoting its “sources privy to internal discussions in New Delhi”, the news agency Reuters reported that the warning shots of “reverse sanctions”, should India ban Huawei from its 5G business under pressure from the US, were fired when the Indian Ambassador was summoned to the Foreign Ministry.

India will start trialling 5G in the coming months but has not selected the vendors yet. Ravi Shankar Prasad, the telecom minister, told the parliament earlier that Huawei was one of the vendors that have submitted proposals, though he did not name the others.

“On the issue of Chinese enterprises participating in the construction of India’s 5G, we hope the Indian side makes an independent and objective decision, and provides a fair, just and non-discriminatory commercial environment for Chinese enterprises’ investment and operations, to realize mutual benefit,” said the spokesperson of China’s foreign ministry in a statement sent to Reuters. “Huawei has carried out operations in India for a long time and has made contributions to the development of Indian society and the economy that is clear to all.”

Like all obscure diplomatic parlance, the statement said less than what is left unsaid. However, the stress on “independent” is a clear message that India should calculate its own gains and losses when making the decision, independent of US pressure.

When it comes to security, the parliamentary committee tasked to evaluate the vendors has not found evidence to suggest that Huawei has comprised the security in its current business in India, according to Reuters’ sources.

Similar to the difficult choice the post-Brexit UK has to make, siding with the US or siding with China, when it comes to how to deal with Huawei, India is also caught in the cross fire of the trade war, and its situation is arguably trickier. The US is India’s most important trade partner and the country the Modi government (which has just won the general election with an enlarged majority) desperately would love to be on good terms with.

China, on the other hand, closer to home but is a much smaller trading partner, though a few of India’s leading companies (Tata, Infosys, etc.) do have a limited presence. Meanwhile, the world’s two most populous countries share a long border and do not always see eye to eye. In 2017 there was a two-month long army standoff in a disputed area between the two countries.

While our expert suggested that a way out for the UK could be a government mandated multi-vendor policy, a similar idea was devised by the Indian National Security Advisory Board (NSAB). But instead of asking the telcos to deploy equipment from more than one vendor, the NSAB experts suggested that, if the telcos choose to use Huawei hardware, then the software “to drive equipment” should be Indian-made. This may look reasonable on paper, but since 5G is so heavily software reliant, it is hard to predict how the demarcation will be drawn.