Abu Dhabi investment fund buys 1.85% Jio Platforms stake

Reliance Industries have found a fifth investor to purchase a handsome stake in Jio Platforms, its digital business unit, with Mubadala signing a $1.2 billion cheque for 1.85%.

Confirmed via Twitter, Khaled Abdulla Al Qubaisi, CEO of the Aerospace, Renewables and ICT portfolios for Mubadala, revealed the $1.2 billion investment will make the firm a stake holder in Jio Platforms, the holding company of disruptive telco Reliance Jio and numerous other digital ventures. “This investment is in line with our current ICT strategy and complements our portfolio of investments in telecoms, satellite operations, data centres and other ICT infrastructure,” Al Qubaisi said.

For Reliance Industries, it certainly caps off a successful seven weeks, though who knows whether there are other irons in the fire.

Jio Platform investments since April 22, 2020
Partner Stake Investment Date
Mubadala 1.85% $1.2 billion 4 June
General Atlantic 1.34% $860 million 18 May
Vista Equity Partner 2.32% $1.5 billion 11 May
Silver Lake 1.15% $750 million 4 May
Facebook 9.9% $5.7 billion 22 April
Total 16.56% $10.01 billion

As you can see from the table above, it certainly has been a profitable couple of weeks for the Reliance Industries MD Mukesh Ambani. Aside from the additional cash which is being invested into the business to continue network deployment and upgrades, there are some interesting synergies.

Facebook, for example, offers interesting opportunities to work with SMEs in the emerging cashless economy. General Atlantic already invests in Doctolib, digital healthcare platform in Europe to connect health professionals and patients. Mubadala is the same.

One of the Mubadala investments happens to be Yahsat, a satellite company which offers voice and data coverage across 161 countries. Not only could this company assist Jio by improving the connectivity patchwork in India, it is also an interesting partner to have in the mix for international roaming.

Each of these investors have expertise and investments which would be of interest to the Jio connectivity mission, or the second wave of monetization which follows the democratisation of the mobile internet.

4G subscriptions in India (2015-21), thousands
Year Bharti Airtel Vodafone Idea Reliance Jio Other Total
2015 1,459 21* 77 1,557
2016 10,800 9,541* 72,000 3,700 95,150
2017 30,000 36,998* 160,091 22,466 242,130
2018 77,067 75,300 280,100 22 433,061
2019 127,345 104,200 370,000 604,745
2020 180,491 105,062 406,978 702,686
2021 219,718 110,344 403,310 754,803

*For simplicity, Vodafone India and Idea Cellular subscriptions have been bundled together

Source: Omdia World Information Series

The table above offers a lot of information, but there are a few very important points which we would like to draw attention to.

Firstly, the total number of 4G subscriptions in India. At 754 million, there is still plenty of headroom for growth in a country where the population exceeds 1.3 billion. Secondly, the Reliance Jio disruption dragged the India market through a digital revolution from 2016 onwards. And third, Reliance Jio has a much greater opportunity to diversify revenues through digital services as it has more 4G subscriptions than its rivals.

When you look at the subscriptions data for all mobile technologies, adding everything from 1G through to 5G, the market share battle looks a lot more flattering for Bharti Airtel and Vodafone Idea, but it is a misleading picture. We are focusing on the 4G subscriptions as there is much more potential for additional revenues from this generation of mobile connectivity.

The blunt force object approach to telecoms is selling more subscriptions at an attractive price. Reliance Jio is clearly better at this than rivals, and there is more opportunity to sell 4G contracts in India. This will make Reliance an interesting investment, but the more savvy investors will look at everything this connectivity enables.

Through Jio Platforms, Reliance Industries has launched ventures into digital entertainment, AI, enterprise connectivity, IOT and many others. Democratising connectivity is an entry point to build a second wave of businesses as more of India is brought into the digital economy. These additional investments could be healthcare orientated, offering an alternative to traditional banking infrastructure or digitising government services. As the growth of Silicon Valley has shown, there is potential to make fortunes by leveraging connectivity.

This is why Jio Platforms is getting foreign investors excited. There is so much more to India’s digital economy than selling 4G subscriptions.

Amazon said to be considering $2 billion stake in Bharti Airtel

The strange big tech arms race in the Indian telecoms sector looks set to escalate further if Amazon buys a major stake in Bharti Airtel.

The rumour comes courtesy of Reuters, which has had a word with no less than three people who reckon they’re clued up on the situation. They say Amazon is in early-stage talks to buy a stake worth at least $2 billion in Indian mobile operator Bharti Airtel. That would apparently equate to around 5% of the company, although it seems Amazon could double that investment if it got a sudden rush of blood.

While the Indian telecoms market is arguably the number one growth opportunity in the global market, the operators left standing are all in a lot of debt. That, combined with the depressed value of assets thanks to the coronavirus-induced global recession means there are some great investment opportunities. Not only do they offer potential capital growth, having a piece of the action also grants access to billions of Indian punters.

Which explains why US internet giants are showing such an interest. In April Facebook chucked $5.7 billion at Reliance Jio and last week it was reported that Google is having a sniff around Vodafone Idea. While all this cash will doubtless come with major strings attached, this is probably good for the Indian telecoms sector as a whole as it should enable the operators concerned to accelerate their network rollout plans.

Road to successful digital transformation: Platform, Ecosystem, and Continuous Reinvention

There aren’t many telecom operators in the world that have not yet realised the importance of digital transformation. However, too often we have seen piecemeal measures being taken, which almost invariably lead to unsatisfactory results.

To succeed in digital transformation, telecoms industry stakeholders need to collaborate and embrace a holistic approach, building from platform up, reaching out to partners beyond the conventional telecoms domains to develop an ecosystem that can address changing market demands, and continuously delivering the most up to date solutions to enable customer value creation.

It is a valid statement that every telecom operator is different from the next one, because the customers they are serving are different, by geography, by segment, or by demographics, often by all of these factors. On the other hand, there is also strong commonality between operators, because the fundamental requirements to support digital service provision that most of the customers demand are the same. These include data collection, storage, governance, and cross-domain data analysis, frictionless handling and delivery of content and service, accurate billing, payment settlement, and many more.

This makes it a classic scenario where the 80:20 principle should apply. In other words, about 80% of a typical customer’s demand to power their digital services can be satisfied by a strong unified platform. Such a platform should be able to satisfy most use cases, carry out common tasks like network planning, construction, maintenance, optimisation, and operations, and should be equipped with the full AI suite, including AI algorithm engine, one-stop AI development environment, and AI service operation.

The platform should also have the flexibility to enable partners to develop or customise their own use cases. This is where the other 20% of customer requirement should be addressed. Despite the strong commonality between operator demands, no single platform can satisfy all the different requirements, and these are better served by a vibrant ecosystem gravitated towards the platform. Such a “pull” effect can be achieved with the platform’s capability to enable, to certify, to support, to incentivise, and so on.

When it comes to incentives to attract more partners to the ecosystem, different revenue sharing schemes can be implemented. For example, if the customer’s demand can be satisfied by a partner’s standard solution, in other words, if the partner does not need to customise its solutions for the customer, revenues may be split equally between the platform and the partner. In cases where partners need to customise their solutions to meet customer needs, the partners should have a bigger share of the revenues. The platform can also set up an “application marketplace” to host apps developed by partners. In such cases, dominant revenue sharing models used by leading consumer and business application stores, for example Salesforce AppExchange should be applied.

One operational characteristic that has separated internet companies from conventional telecom operators is that internet companies would undergo continuous delivery of new features and functions while telecom operators’ networks and services are more static. This needs to change if telecom operators’ digital transformation is to succeed. Such continuous reinvention is not limited to functions and technologies of the digital platform either, it should also continuously improve the enablement of the ecosystem that the platform orchestrates. Equally important is that such continuous delivery of improvement should not only be frequent but also discreet, without interrupting customers’ business operation.

As we can see, successful interaction between the three key elements, the platform, the ecosystem, and the continuous operation, to create values for customers relies heavily on the strengths of the platform.

Source: Huawei

Huawei’s General Digital Engine (GDE) is such a unified big data platform. It is built with the company’s expertise accumulated and refreshed from over three decades’ experience of serving telecom operators and other customers around the world. Such expertise has been with our engineers but with the GDE platform, it is now digitised and can serve all the customers in a broad range of service scenarios. It is also equipped with Huawei’s artificial intelligence and machine learning capabilities to help customers cope with and predict market and business demands that go beyond the capability of manual calculation.

Such expertise and capability are continuously being updated, to make the platform more powerful and able to meet more customer needs, therefore simplifying the transformation, shortening the time to market, and optimising lifetime total cost of ownership. Huawei will keep updating the platform, at least twice a year, to enable partners to deliver customisation more easily.

The platform is also the anchor point of a broader ecosystem, working with operator customers to first engage qualified existing partners, then to recruit new partners.

Moreover, the platform, the ecosystem, and the continuous operation mode all live by these values:

  • Agility: always ready to adapt to new market and customer needs and opportunities
  • Openness: open-minded approach to new technologies and new approach to solve problems
  • Equality: treating all partners in the ecosystem equally and fairly

Rakuten takes first step towards a hybrid operator/vendor telco

Rakuten and NEC will develop a containerized standalone (SA) 5G core network, which will become one of the first products available on the Rakuten Communications Platform (RCP).

Although any news or developments coming out of Tokyo are of interest to the world nowadays, there are two very distinct elements to this announcement. Firstly, the creation of a containerized SA 5G core network, and secondly, the emergence of a hybrid telco model, where Rakuten is an operator but also a vendor, selling products to other telcos who want to embrace the open revolution.

“We are very excited to collaborate with NEC on the development of our standalone 5G core network,” said Tareq Amin, CTO of Rakuten Mobile.

“Our partnership with NEC represents a joint collaboration to build an open, secure and highly scalable 4G and 5G cloud native converged core, that will also become a key feature of the highly competitive services we will offer to global customers through the Rakuten Communications Platform.”

The containerised SA 5G network core will be built on software source code developed by NEC, powering the standalone network launch in 2021 (theoretically). Although the product itself is not exactly revolutionary, the concept has been discussed for years, the selection of NEC is a notable one.

NEC software will be the brain of Rakuten’s network, one which is build on OpenRAN technology and virtualised components. This is a vote of confidence in the Japanese vendor, a mark of credibility in an ecosystem which is still in its embryonic days. The inclusion in one of the industry’s most ground-breaking projects certainly gives it an advantage over rivals, many of whom are attempting to justify their existence in the Open ecosystem.

The Rakuten overarching mission is one which has captured the imagination and interest from telcos around the world; an attempt to build a network entirely with ‘open’, non-proprietary technologies. Should it work, it could be a gamechanger when it comes to the telco supply chain.

The promise from Rakuten is to deploy a network cheaper than via traditional means, but also to slash operational costs. The executive team has already said it envisions a network operations team of hundreds, as opposed to thousands as per normal, which could result in saving millions each year. If these savings are transferred through to lower data tariffs, there could be a disruptive force on the horizon.

Should this gamble pay off for Rakuten, there will be considerable interest in the ‘open’ ecosystem, with NEC collecting much of the plaudits but the likes of Mavenir, Parallel Wireless, Altiostar, Red Hat, Cisco, Innoeye and Netcracker all benefitting. These companies are of course very interesting, but it is the Rakuten Communications Platform (RCP) which is a more dramatic shift.

Rakuten has not been shy about his intentions to sell its ideas. It is an interesting move, as few telcos would want to sell their family jewels, and this is what the Rakuten ‘open’ network would be. This is the secret recipe, a competitive edge over rivals, but Rakuten wants to monetise this.

With all the innovation taking place in Rakuten’s network deployment strategy, the opportunity to monetize these ideas by selling to potential rivals is certainly a new approach. Few other telcos would want to take this approach, but few other telcos can implement this strategy in earnest, perhaps explaining why it is open to selling the secret recipe.

Rakuten’s network is greenfield, while most others are brownfield. Rakuten can implement these new ideas everywhere, whereas rivals can only consider elements here and there. Rakuten will always have an advantage taking a wholesale approach, whereas others can only take the bit-part route.

This is a new dynamic, a new business model for the telcos, creating a blended operator/vendor hybrid company. Should this work, it will be interesting to see how many other telcos embrace such a collaborative mindset, one which is very counterintuitive to attitudes today.

US path to mid-band spectrum not as simple as some make it seem

Despite many proclamations and posturing during the development years of 5G, mmWave is not living up to expectations, but securing valuable mid-band assets is becoming an increasingly complex project.

As it stands in the US market, T-Mobile US has access to 2.1 GHz spectrum to deliver 5G services. These assets were accessible due to the recently approved merger with Sprint and offers a significant advantage over Verizon and AT&T, both of whom are still operating in the high-frequency airwaves, the mmWave, which delivers high-speed and low coverage for an overall substandard experience.

Over the next 12-18 months, theoretically, more mid-band spectrum should be made available to the likes of Verizon and AT&T, as well as Dish as it expands its offering, through three separate spectrum auctions. However, there is still plenty which can go wrong in the meantime according to Chris Pearson, President of 5G Americas.

“If history shows us anything it is that we have not been very successful at co-operation,” Pearson said during a call with Telecoms.com.

What Pearson is referring to here is collaboration between private industry and public organisations to either harmonise spectrum usage or clearing the bands to offer more power to the mobile service providers. There are success stories, clearing the 1700-2100 MHz airwaves is one, but these outcomes are seemingly more the exception rather than the rule.

The issue with spectrum is simple. High frequencies offer exceptional download speeds but very poor coverage, while at the other end with low-frequency bands a telco can offer excellent coverage, but the download speeds and latency will be woeful. This is why mid-band assets are so important, it is a more palatable compromise between speed and coverage, a mobile experience which can be sold as an upgrade to customers.

When we asked Telecoms.com readers about how important the mid-band airwaves are 68% said without these assets it is impossible to deliver an attractive 5G service. Only 3% said the industry should be paying more attention to mmWave, and 8% believed mid-band spectrum is critical for the moment but its importance would fade behind mmWave eventually.

“Can we move along without it,” Pearson said. “Absolutely. But for the long-term we will need more spectrum.”

As Pearson highlights, there are three spectrum auctions on the horizon which are worth paying attention to. At the end of July, the ‘CBRS’ band at 3.5 GHz will make 150 MHz of spectrum available to the industry. In December, the C-Band airwaves (3.7-4.2 GHz) should be cleared up to make an additional 280 MHz of spectrum available. And the NCIA (NATO Communications and Information Agency) is currently producing a report to free up more assets in the 3.1-3.55 GHz range.

Theoretically, there should be plenty of spectrum available for the mobile network operators to deliver a comprehensive 5G solution, though this is under the assumption that everything runs smoothly.

Firstly, the ‘CBRS’ auction has already been delayed once. It should go ahead of course, but there is always a risk.

Secondly, the C-Band auction, scheduled to take place in December, is currently under threat from legal action. Several smaller satellite broadcasting companies who are being asked to vacate and/or move operations in these airwaves are kicking up a fuss. The aim is to shift the satellite operators in the 3.7-4.2 GHz range into a consolidated 200 MHz block, which would offer plenty of room for the telcos to play around it, but there are dissenters.

PSSI Global Services has filed a lawsuit in the District of Columbia arguing the FCC is crippling the entire industry by forcing through the changes in this spectrum band. Should this legal challenge gather momentum or spin-off into different directions, it could impact the availability of assets in the C-Band range, and subsequently delay the auction.

The final area is another very difficult issue to manage. The report which is being produced for the 3.1-3.55 GHz range has only completed one of six sections. This report is supposed to shed light on what the spectrum is being used for, by whom and ways which it can be rationalised to add more available spectrum for mobile operators. But Pearson highlighted that progress has been sluggish.

The issue seems to be that it is difficult to understand what the spectrum is currently being used for, the incumbents are not being the most helpful as there are confidentiality hurdles to negotiate. No-one officially knows what this spectrum is actually being used for which usually means it is something to do with the military or intelligence services.

Without co-operation from the incumbents, it becomes very difficult to audit these airwaves and create a logical strategy to move forward.

To understand the importance of mid-band spectrum, it is worth looking at the experience being delivered without access.

According to OpenSignal’s most recent analysis of the US market, Verizon is delivering speeds few other international telcos can compete with over mmWave, but this digital dream is only accessible to 0.5% of its 5G subscribers. Elsewhere, for example in the UK where mid-band spectrum is being utilised, there is a speed upgrade (albeit nowhere near as much) but 12X more users are able to access the 5G airwaves.

What is critical about 5G right now is not delivering gigabit speed over the air, there are no applications which require this today, but demonstrating 5G is an upgraded service. Speed and latency improvements are a must, but if the users cannot access them the money spent on 5G networks are a complete and utter waste of time.

The US does of course recognise this situation, Pearson highlighted there is momentum gathering in support of the telcos in Washington, however it is far from an ideal situation. This is a pain point, though there is plenty of risk on the horizon to acting as a blocker for the solution.

China leads the way as mobile network core market proves resilient

With the difficulties presented by COVID-19, the 5G roadmap might not have progressed as planned, but growth has remained steady for mobile core deployments.

There might be a few vendors nursing headaches as RAN deployments have not scaled as some would have expected, but some consolation can be found in the network core segment. Over the last twelve months, the segment grew 10% to nearly $8 billion with several high-profile deals inked, most notably in China.

“Our outlook has become more positive, especially since the Chinese service providers accelerated their plans for 5G Core deployments,” said David Bolan, Senior Analyst at Dell’Oro.

“China Mobile and China Unicom have completed their 5G Core tenders, and plan to launch 5G service early in 3Q20. We expect other Chinese service providers will follow very soon. This has raised our outlook to an anticipated growth of 14 percent year over year for the trailing four quarters ending in 1Q21.”

In April, China Mobile selected Ericsson, ZTE and Huawei to deploy 5G network cores across the country, while Nokia saw a minor victory by securing a contract for core deployments with China Unicom. With China Telecom and China Broadcast Network, the newly created fourth telco, undergoing their own tenders, there could be some PR wins on the horizon.

While China is surging forward with its network deployment strategy, it is not alone. In Germany, some activities might be inhibited by the on-going coronavirus pandemic, however Telefonica Deutschland has awarded the contract to deploy its own network core to Ericsson.

“As a network operator serving the most mobile customers in Germany, we have a special social responsibility to provide secure networks,” Telefonica Deutschland CEO Markus Haas said.

Work should be completed on the network core during 2021, with the team targeting network slicing and edge computing services.

“With our cloud compatible 5G core network, we are entering a new technology era,” said Mallik Rao, CTO of Telefónica Deutschland. “Gigabit data rates, real-time communication and massive IoT – these visions are now becoming reality.

“We have a clear plan for the further development of our network infrastructure towards a standalone 5G network that can handle the massive data streams of the future and open up new digital business models for all our customers. In doing so, we are relying on the latest network technologies that the market has to offer.”

Similar to other European nations, German telcos have made the decision to remove Huawei, and other vendors who would be deemed high risk, from network cores. Interestingly enough, this trend does not seem to have had too much of a material impact on Huawei’s business. Dell’Oro estimates Huawei and Ericsson combined for over half of the market, while Nokia, ZTE, and Cisco more than 25%.

Although the network core elements of 5G is not the most financially rewarding for the infrastructure vendors, it is a very good sign for the industry. Although widespread installation of 5G base stations are an easy boast, 5G services cannot be delivered in earnest without a 5G network core, enough fibre in the ground and a dispersed cloud network where enough attention has been given to the edge.

Progress in the core is progress for 5G as new services, such as network slicing and automation, can be more effectively delivered. It might not be the most profitable part of the industry, but perhaps a more material indicator of 5G progress. 5G RAN offers a speed upgrade, somewhat of an aesthetic benefit, but the core offers the opportunity to deliver services which were not realistic in the 4G era.

As MasMovil becomes latest acquisition target, are more takeovers on the horizon?

KKR, Cinven and Providence have combined forces to buy Spanish telco MasMovil, but with depressed share prices and regulatory opinions shifting, it could be the first of many corporate transactions.

The merger and acquisition landscape has been somewhat quiet over the last few months, since the COVID-19 pandemic set in across the world, but we struggle to believe there are not cash rich investment funds considering weighty purchases. The most successful investment funds are only such because they can sniff an opportunity, and this is exactly what the MasMovil acquisition should be viewed as; corporate opportunism.

There are still approvals needed from Banca de Espana, the Spanish Telecoms ministry and Industry & Commerce ministry (foreign investment approval), as well as competition authorities in the EU, China, Turkey, Serbia and Israel. However, we suspect the process will run smoothly, especially considering MasMovil CEO Meinrad Spenger has already said he would support the transaction.

First reported by Reuters, the trio of bankers have now made an official public tender offer for $3.3 billion, a 22% premium on the opening share price this morning (June 1). Share price has surged 20%, as one would expect, though it has only just crept above the pre-lockdown levels.

This is what is very interesting about the telco market currently; share price for all major and minor telcos is severely depressed. For those who have money available, and the desire to push into the telecoms space, it is a very attractive opportunity currently.

Share price of selected European telcos during COVID-19 lockdown period
Telco Share Price, June 1 Share Price, Feb 3 Change
BT 120.51 163.34 -26%
Telecom Italia 0.48 0.34 -29%
Telefonica 6.11 4.48 -26%
Telenor 17.75 15.02 -15%
Orange 12.80 10.98 -14%
Vodafone 150.82 134.86 -11%

Share prices accurate at the time of writing – 10.30am, June 1

Some of the companies mentioned above would be too big to consider to be an acquisition target, Orange or Telefonica for example, though others could certainly fall into the right bracket. BT has a market capitalisation of £11.9 billion and is underperforming against UK rivals considerably, while the likes of KPN in the Netherlands could be another interesting target. Sitting third in the mobile market share rankings in the Netherlands, a cash injection and refreshed strategy could be a worthwhile gamble with the telco’s market capitalisation currently €9.42 billion.

Of course what is also worth noting is that the opportunity for acquiring business is not just limited to the bankers. Thanks to a ruling from the European Court of Justice, telcos might have renewed enthusiasm for market consolidation.

Last week, the General Court of the European Court of Justice annulled a decision made in 2016 to block a merger between O2 and Three in the UK on the grounds of competition. In annulling this decision, it challenges the long-standing belief that mergers which would take a market from four operators to three would be vetoed automatically.

This decision is very important for those who have been championing market consolidation. Some argue fewer telcos would results in more concentrated network investment, as well as scaled economics thanks to larger customer bases. The decision from the European courts opens the door for potential market consolidation.

There are of course markets where consolidation is not realistic, the Netherlands or Belgium for example where there are only three mobile network operators (MNOs) today, but there are others where this could be an interesting development. Spain is certainly one of them.

The Spanish market is one where there is plenty of competition. There are currently four major mobile operators, albeit MasMovil is an MVNO, while Euskaltel announced plans to challenge the market with a Virgin Media branded proposition. KKR, Cinven and Providence want to take control of MasMovil, but might Orange be tempted to muscle in on the action?

Telco subscriptions in Spain (2018-2021)
Telco 2018 2019 2020 2021
Orange 19,450,963 19,016,941 19,783,330 19,890,931
Telefonica 18,384,400 18,916,801 19,579,529 20,040,114
Vodafone 15,500,832 15,427,639 15,262,546 15,406,460
MasMovil 6,760,000 7,435,000 7,513,777 7,952,289

Source: Omdia World Information Series

MasMovil could look attractive to Orange for several reasons. Firstly, this is a telco which is heading in the right direction, subscriptions are growing year-on-year. Secondly, MasMovil has bought into the convergence business model which is being championed by the Orange Group. And finally, MasMovil is a MVNO customer of Orange’s Spanish wholesale business, making integration a bit simpler.

With the European courts turning a new page on market consolidation, possibly indicating authorities might be more accommodating of such transactions, this could be an idea which is being discussed in the Orange offices. It would make sense for Orange’s ambitions in the country, while MasMovil is open to some sort of transaction.

Some might also suggest Telefonica would be interested, but with the management team desperate to reduce the €44 billion debt burden and its credit ratings not exactly sparkling, this is unlikely. Vodafone might have considered such a move at another time, but it has larger problems to tackle without adding the complications of an acquisition, most notably in India and Italy.

Speculation aside, KKR, Cinven and Providence will attempt to buy the Spanish challenger telco. With a depressed share price and appreciation for the importance of the telecoms industry at its highest levels, we would not be surprised if this is only the first of several transactions from investment funds, though telco consolidation is also another story worth keeping a close eye on.

A look back at the biggest stories this week

Whether it’s important, depressing or just entertaining, the telecoms industry is always one which attracts attention.

Here are the stories we think are worth a second look at this week:


GSMA cosies up to O-RAN Alliance

The GSMA, the telco industry lobby group, has announced a new partnership with the O-RAN Alliance to accelerate the adoption of Open Radio Access Network (RAN) technologies.

Full story here


Europe backtracks on market consolidation opposition

The General Court of the European Court of Justice has annulled a decision made in 2016 to block the merger between O2 and Three in the UK, potentially opening the door for consolidation.

Full story here


Huawei CFO loses first legal battle in extradition case

Huawei CFO Wanzhou Meng, the daughter of Ren Zhengfei, has lost her first legal battle in Canada and will now have to face an extradition case.

Full story here


Data privacy is in the same position as cybersecurity five years ago

It has taken years for the technology and telecoms industry to take security seriously, and now we are at the beginning of the same story arc with privacy.

Full story here


Indian telco association pushes for ‘floor tariffs’ on data pricing

In an open letter to India’s telecoms regulator, the Cellular Operators Association of India (COAI) has pressed for quicker decision making on pricing restriction rules.

Full story here


UK’s National Cyber Security Centre launches another Huawei probe

The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) has confirmed it is attempting to understand what impact potential US sanction directed towards Huawei would have on UK networks.

Full story here


 

Making Sense of the Telco Cloud

In recent years the cloudification of communication networks, or “telco cloud” has become a byword for telecom modernisation. This Telecoms.com Intelligence Monthly Briefing aims to analyse what telcos’ transition to cloud means to the stakeholders in the telecom and cloud ecosystems. Before exploring the nooks and crannies of telco cloud, however, it is worthwhile first taking an elevated view of cloud native in general. On one hand, telco cloud is a subset of the overall cloud native landscape, on the other, telco cloud almost sounds an oxymoron. Telecom operator’s monolithic networks and cloud architecture are often seen as two different species, but such impressions are wrong.

(Here we are sharing the opening section of this Telecoms.com Intelligence special briefing to look into how telco cloud has changing both the industry landscape and operator strategies.

The full version of the report is available for free to download here.)

What cloud native is, and why we need it

“Cloud native” have been buzz words for a couple of years though often, like with many other buzz words, different people mean many different things when they use the same term. As the authors of a recently published Microsoft ebook quipped, ask ten colleagues to define cloud native, and there’s good chance you’ll get eight different answers. (Rob Vettor, Steve “ardalis” Smith: Architecting Cloud Native .NET Applications for Azure, preview edition, April 2020)

Here are a couple of “cloud native” definitions that more or less agree with each other, though with different stresses.

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), an industry organisation with over 500 member organisations from different sectors of the industry, defines cloud native as “computing (that) uses an open source software stack to deploy applications as microservices, packaging each part into its own container, and dynamically orchestrating those containers to optimize resource utilization.”

Gabriel Brown, an analyst from Heavy Reading, has a largely similar definition for cloud native, though he puts it more succinctly. For him, cloud native means “containerized micro-services deployed on bare metal and managed by Kubernetes”, the de facto standard of container management.

Although cloud native has a strong inclination towards containers, or containerised services, it is not just about containers. An important element of cloud native computing is in its deployment mode using DevOps. This is duly stressed by Omdia, a research firm, which prescribes cloud native as “the first foundation is to use agile methodologies in development, building on this with DevOps adoption across IT and, ideally, in the organization as well, and using microservices software architecture, with deployment on the cloud (wherever it is, on-premises or public).”

Some would argue the continuous nature of DevOps is as important to cloud native as the infrastructure and containerised services. Red Hat, an IBM subsidiary and one of the leading cloud native vendors and champions for DevOps practices, sees cloud native in a number of common themes including “heavily virtualized, software-defined, highly resilient infrastructure, allowing telcos to add services more quickly and centrally manage their resources.”

These themes are aligned with the understanding of cloud native by Telecoms.com Intelligence, and this report will discuss cloud native and telco cloud along this line. (A full Q&A with Azhar Sayeed, Chief Architect, Service Provider at Red Hat can be found at the end of this report).

The main benefits of cloud native computing are speed, agility, and scalability. As CNCF spells it out, “cloud native technologies empower organizations to build and run scalable applications in modern, dynamic environments such as public, private, and hybrid clouds. Containers, service meshes, microservices, immutable infrastructure, and declarative APIs exemplify this approach. These techniques enable loosely coupled systems that are resilient, manageable, and observable. Combined with robust automation, they allow engineers to make high-impact changes frequently and predictably with minimal toil.”

To adapt such thinking to the telecom industry, the gains from migrating to cloud native are primarily a reflection of, and driven by, the increasing convergence between network and IT domains. The first candidate domain that cloud technology can vastly improve on, and to a certain degree replace the heavy infrastructure, is the support for the telcos’ own IT systems, including the network facing Operational Support Systems and customer facing Business Support System (OSS and BSS).

But IT cloud alone is far from what telcos can benefit from the migration to cloud native. The rest of this report will discuss how telcos can and do embark on the journey to cloud native, as a means to deliver true business benefits through improved speed, agility, and scalability to their own networks and their customers.

The rest of the report include these sections:

  • The many stratifications of telco cloud
  • Clouds gathering on telcos
  • What we can expect to see on the telco cloud skyline
  • Telco cloud openness leads to agility and savings — Q&A with Azhar Sayeed, Chief Architect, Service Provider, Red Hat
  • Additional Resources

The full version of the report is available for free to download here.

Making Sense of the Telco Cloud

“Telco cloud” has become a byword for telecom modernisation, though views on exactly what the cloudification of communication networks entails may vary from people to people. This Telecoms.com Intelligence monthly briefing, sponsored by Red Hat, explores the implications of telecom operators’ migration to cloud on their strategies, as well as the different options they may pursue. Although in the long run telecom operators and internet companies will find increasing convergence, and we are seeing more cross-ownership between the two types of businesses, telco’s evolution to cloud native will be a long process and may take different shapes.