Finland joins the quest for quantum computing strengths

The Technical Research Centre of Finland is going to build the country’s first quantum computer, joining a growing European contingent to compete at the front of next generation computing technology.

VTT, Finland’s state-owned Technical Research Centre (Teknologian tutkimuskeskus VTT Oy) announced that it will design and build the country’s first quantum computer, in partnership with “progressive Finnish companies from a variety of sectors”, aiming to “bolster Finland’s and Europe’s competitiveness” in this cutting-edge technology.

“In the future, we’ll encounter challenges that cannot be met using current methods. Quantum computing will play an important role in solving these kinds of problems,” said Antti Vasara, CEO of VTT. Referring to the country’s challenge of post-COVID-19 recover, Vasara said “it’s now even more important than ever to make investments in innovation and future technologies that will create demand for Finnish companies’ products and services.”

The multi-year project, with a total cost estimated about €20-25 million, will run in phases. The first checkpoint will be about a year from now, when VTT targets to “get a minimum five-qubit quantum computer in working order”, it said in the press release. Qubit, or “quantum bit”, is the basic information unit in quantum computing, analogous to binary digit, or “bit”, in classical computing.

In all fairness, this is a modest target on a modest budget. To put the 5-qubit target into perspective, by late last year, Google claimed that its quantum computer had achieve 53-qubit computing power. It could perform a task in 200 seconds that would take Summit, one of IBM’s supercomputers, 2.5 days by IBM’s own admission. By the time of writing, VTT has not responded to Telecoms.com’s question on the project’s ultimate target.

When it comes to budget, the VTT amount is easily dwarfed by the more ambitious projects. Although the most advanced quantum computers in the world are developed and run by the leading American technology companies and academic institutions, for example the MIT, IBM, and Google. But other parts of the world are quickly building their own facilities, including businesses and universities in Japan, India, China, and Europe. One of the high-profile cases recently is IBM’s decision to build Europe’s first commercial quantum computer in German’s state-backed research institute in Fraunhofer, near Stuttgart.

In addition to getting closer to and better serving the European markets in the future, IBM’s decision to build a quantum computer in Europe is also to do with GDPR requirement. While European businesses can use IBM’s quantum computer located in the US, through the cloud, they may hesitate when sending user data outside of the EU. The Fraunhofer project has been personally endorsed by Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor. The federal government has pledged €650 million investment for quantum computing, though not in the Fraunhofer project alone.

When it comes to quantum computing applications in the communications industry, at least two areas it can have strong impact. The first is security. Quantum computing will enable new modes of cryptography. The second is new materials. Daimler, the carmaker, has already used IBM’s quantum computers to design new batteries for its electric cars by simulating the complex molecule level chemistry inside the battery cells. On top of batteries, another research topic in new materials in the communications industry is to find silicon replacement as semiconductor in extremely high radio spectrums.

Despite its modest scope, the VTT undertaking is significant. Not only does it give Finland the right to boast of being the first Nordic country to build its own quantum computer, the success of the project would “provide Finland with an exceptional level of capabilities in both research and technology”. Faced with the worst economic crisis since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Nordic nation is looking to technology breakthroughs for sustainable revival and long-term competitiveness. Quantum computing capability of this project, if not pursuing supremacy, limited by its scope, may at least give Finland the table stake.

Amazon launches quantum computing service

Amazon Web Services (AWS) has announced the launch of Braket, a quantum computing service, as well as two research centres for the technology.

This is not to say the world will be revolutionised by quantum computing tomorrow, but the new service allows scientists, researchers, and developers to begin experimenting with computers from quantum hardware providers. As with anything AWS related, the economies of scale afforded through cloud computing services make the prospect of quantum computing more affordable for the ecosystem.

“With quantum engineering starting to make more meaningful progress, customers are asking for ways to experiment with quantum computers and explore the technology’s potential,” said Charlie Bell, SVP of Utility Computing Services at AWS.

“We believe that quantum computing will be a cloud-first technology and that the cloud will be the main way customers access the hardware. With our Amazon Braket service and Amazon Quantum Solutions Lab, we’re making it easier for customers to gain experience using quantum computers and to work with experts from AWS and our partners to figure out how they can benefit from the technology.”

Amazon Braket is a fully managed service is a single development environment which will allow customers to build quantum algorithms, test them on simulated quantum computers. This is the first-step in engaging the ecosystem and democratising a technology which is only accessible (and understood by) a very small number of people around the world.

Alongside the launch of Braket, AWS will also be launching two research centres. The first, the AWS Center for Quantum Computing, which is being established at Caltech, will focus on academic research to further the segment. The second, Amazon Quantum Solutions Lab, will focus on working with customers to make more practical solutions for industry.

Google claims quantum computing breakthrough, IBM disagrees

Google says it has achieved ‘quantum supremacy’, as its Sycamore chip performed a calculation, which would have taken the world’s fastest supercomputer 10,000 years, in 200 seconds.

It seems quite a remarkable upgrade, but this is the potential of quantum computing. This is not a step-change in technology, but a revolution on the horizon.

Here, Google is claiming its 53-qubit computer performed a task in 200 seconds, which would have taken Summit, a supercomputer IBM built for the Department of Energy, 10,000 years. That said, IBM is disputing the claim suggesting Google is massively exaggerating how long it would take Summit to complete the same task. After some tweaks, IBM has said it would take Summit 2.5 days.

Despite the potential for exaggeration, this is still a breakthrough for Google.

For the moment, it seems to be nothing more than a humble brag. Like concept cars at the Tokyo Motor Show, the purpose is to inflate the ego of Google and create a perception of market leadership in the quantum computing world. Although this is an area which could be critically important for the digital economy in years to come, the technology is years away from being commercially viable.

Nonetheless, this is an impressive feat performed by the team. It demonstrates the value of persisting with quantum computing and will have forward-thinking, innovative data scientists around the world dreaming up possible applications of such power.

At the most basic level, quantum computing is a new model of how to build a computer. The original concept is generally attributed to David Deutsch of Oxford University, who at a conference in 1984, pondered the possibility of designing a computer that was based exclusively on quantum rules. After publishing a paper a few months later, which you can see here if you are brave enough, the race to create a quantum computer began.

Today’s ‘classical’ computers store information in binary, where each bit is either on or off. Quantum computation use qubits, which can either be on or off, as well as being both on and off. This might sound incredibly complicated, but the best way to explain is to imagine a sphere.

In classical computing, a bit can be represented by the poles of the sphere, with zero representing the south pole and one representing the north, but in Quantum computing, any point of the sphere can be used to represent any point. This is achieved through a concept called superposition, which means ‘Qbits’ can be represented by a one or a zero, or both at the same time. For example, two qubits in a single superposition could represent four different scenarios.

Irrelevant as to whether you understand the theoretical science behind quantum computing, the important takeaway is that it will allow computers to store, analyse and transfer information much more efficiently. As you can see from the claim Google has made, completing a calculation in 200 seconds as opposed to 10,000 years is a considerable upgrade.

This achieved can be described as ‘quantum supremacy’, in that the chip has enabled a calculation which is realistically impossible on classical computing platforms. From IBM’s perspective, this is a step forward, but not ‘quantum supremacy’ if its computer can complete the same task in 2.5 days.

If this still sounds baffling and overly complex, this is because quantum computing is a field of technology only the tiniest of fractions of the worlds’ population understand. This is cutting-edge science.

“In many ways, the exercise of building a quantum computer is one long lesson in everything we don’t yet understand about the world around us,” said Google CEO Sundar Pichai.

“While the universe operates fundamentally at a quantum level, human beings don’t experience it that way. In fact, many principles of quantum mechanics directly contradict our surface level observations about nature. Yet the properties of quantum mechanics hold enormous potential for computing.”

What is worth taking away here is that understanding the science is not at all important once it has been figured out by people far more intelligent. All normal people need to understand is that this is a technology that will enable significant breakthroughs in the future.

This might sound patronising, but it is not supposed to. Your correspondent does not understand the mechanics of the combustion engine but does understand the journey between London and South Wales is significantly faster by car than on horse.

But what could these breakthroughs actually be?

On the security side, although quantum computing could crack the end-to-end encryption software which is considered unbreakable today, it could theoretically enable the creation of hack-proof replacements.

In artificial intelligence, machine learning is perfect area for quantum computing to be applied. The idea of machine learning is to collect data, analyse said data and provide incremental improvements to the algorithms which are being integrated into software. Analysing the data and applying the lessons learned takes time, which could be dramatically decreased with the introduction of quantum computing.

Looking at the pharmaceutical industry, in order to create new drugs, chemists need to understand the interactions between various molecules, proteins and chemicals to see if medicines will improve cure diseases or introduce dangerous side-effects. Due to the eye-watering number of combinations, this takes an extraordinary amount of time. Quantum computing could significantly reduce the time it takes to understand the interaction but could also be combined with analysing an individual’s genetic make-up to create personalised medicines.

These are three examples of how quantum computing could be applied, but there are dozens more. Weather forecasting could be improved, climate change models could be more accurate, or traffic could be better managed in city centres. As soon as the tools are available, innovators will come up with the ideas of how to best use the technology, probably coming up with solutions to challenges that do not exist today.

Leading this revolutionary approach to computing is incredibly important for any company which wants to dominate the cloud industry in the futuristic digital economy, which is perhaps the reason IBM felt it was necessary to dampen Google’s celebrations.

“Building quantum systems is a feat of science and engineering and benchmarking them is a formidable challenge,” IBM said on its own blog.

“Google’s experiment is an excellent demonstration of the progress in superconducting-based quantum computing, showing state-of-the-art gate fidelities on a 53-qubit device, but it should not be viewed as proof that quantum computers are “supreme” over classical computers.”

Google measured the success of its own quantum computer against IBM’s Summit, a supercomputer which is believed to be the most powerful in the world. By altering the way Summit approaches the same calculation Google used, IBM suggests Summit could come to the same conclusion in 2.5 days rather than 10,000 years.

Google still has the fastest machine, but according to IBM the speed increase does not deserve the title of ‘quantum supremacy’. It might not be practical to ask a computer to process a calculation for 2.5 days, but it is not impossible, therefore the milestone has not been reached.

What is worth noting is that a pinch of salt should be taken with both the Google and IBM claims. These are companies who are attempting to gain the edge and undermine a direct rival. There is probably some truth and exaggeration to both statements made.

And despite this being a remarkable breakthrough for Google, it is of course way too early to get exciting about the applications.

Not only is quantum computing still completely unaffordable for almost every application data scientists are dreaming about today, the calculation was very simple. Drug synthesis or traffic management where every traffic signal is attempting to understand the route of every car in a major city are much more complicated problems.

Scaling these technologies so they are affordable and feasible for commercial applications is still likely to be years away, but as Bill Gates famously stated: “We always overestimate the change that will occur in the next two years and underestimate the change that will occur in the next ten.”

Microsoft Azure casts its eye towards Quantum computing

Microsoft has announced the formation of its Quantum Network in an effort to develop the world’s first scalable quantum computer and quantum applications.

The Network, which was announced during Microsoft’s Startup Summit, is a community which brings together various universities, suppliers, enterprise organisations and start-ups to grow this futuristic segment. It might seem like an unconceivable concept right now, but CEO Satya Nadella has seemingly developed a culture which will not allow Microsoft to sit still, a problem which brought about the dark days of the noughties.

“The Microsoft Quantum Network is our commitment to establishing the partnerships required to build the quantum workforce and the quantum economy,” said Todd Holmdahl, Corporate VP of Azure Hardware Systems Group at Microsoft (pictured). “We believe both are vital to solving some of the world’s toughest problems.”

Of course, Microsoft is not the only competitor in the race to create scalable quantum computing services and products. IBM Q was one of the first industry initiatives to focus on the segment, while Google has created its own division known as AI Quantum. AWS has hinted it will be getting involved before too long, praising the National Quantum Initiative Act in a blog post, though nothing official has emerged just yet. And it’s not just the tech superpowers, Bleximo and ColdQuanta are two companies which received seed funding in 2018.

A classical computer has a memory made up of bits, where each bit is represented by either a one or a zero, however quantum computing maintains a sequence of qubits, which can represent a one, a zero, or any quantum superposition of those two qubit states. The simplest way of explaining this is by imagining a sphere.

In classical computing, a bit can be represented by the poles of the sphere, with zero representing the south pole and one representing the north, but in Quantum computing, any point of the sphere can be used to represent any point. This is achieved through a concept called superposition, which means ‘Qbits’ can be represented by a one or a zero, or both at the same time. For example, two qubits in a single superposition could represent four different scenarios.

Although this is an incredibly simplistic description of the science, it will allow computers to store, analyse and transfer information significantly more efficiently. Each year, the volume of data we consume is growing astronomically, driving the need for such computational power.

While this does sound incredibly beneficial for the world, what is worth noting is this is a segment in its very early days. Progress has been made in creating these supercomputers, though it is far from being perfected, and scalability is nothing more than a distant dream right now. The main problem, aside from incredibly difficult science, seems to be maintaining stability of the machines. Incredibly cold temperatures are needed, while even slight vibrations can cause disruptions.

Eventually, quantum computers will be able to solve complex mathematics problems at speeds which are inconceivable in today’s world. This will become increasingly important in areas such as security, with end-to-end encryption technologies reliant on the concept of it being impossible to solve equations in an efficient enough manner. Should nefarious individuals get their hands on the technology, the currently unbreakable codes would be vulnerable.

Just to demonstrate the power of quantum computing, back in 2015, Google announced it had developed a supercomputer which was more than more than 108 times faster than what was considered classical computing at the time. Computational power has increased in the four years since, but the sheer chasm between classical and quantum is clear.

It might sound like a risk, but on the other hand, cryptography could benefit from this technology significantly. Quantum-based cryptographic systems would be much more secure than what we would consider the norm.

This euphoria will not replace classical computing, as there will always be simplistic usecases such as spreadsheets or email for example, but there are hordes of more complex scenarios which could benefit from quantum computing. The sciences could hugely benefit, as well as more everyday usecases such as scheduling flight runway activities at airports.

Of course, for any of the futuristic ideas to be considered there needs to be scalability. This is one of the main objectives of this Microsoft, bringing quantum computing to the masses quicker than competitors. The technology might sound decades off, but as Bill Gates said; “most overestimate what they can do in one year and underestimate what they can do in ten”.