Nvidia takes 5G to the edge with help from Ericsson and Red Hat

Graphics chip maker Nvidia has unveiled its EGX Edge Supercomputing Platform that is designed to boost 5G, IoT and AI processing at the edge of the network

Nvidia has long been the market leader in GPUs (graphics processing units), which has enabled it to get a strong position in supercomputing, where the parallel processing qualities of GPUs come in especially handy. This EGX initiative seems to be Nvidia’s attempt to translate that position from datacentres to the edge computing.

“We’ve entered a new era, where billions of always-on IoT sensors will be connected by 5G and processed by AI,” said Jensen Huang, Nvidia CEO. “Its foundation requires a new class of highly secure, networked computers operated with ease from far away. We’ve created the Nvidia EGX Edge Supercomputing Platform for this world, where computing moves beyond personal and beyond the cloud to operate at planetary scale.”

There seems to be a fair bit of support for this new platform, with a bunch of companies and even a couple of US cities saying they’re already involved. “Samsung has been an early adopter of both GPU computing and AI from the beginning,” said Charlie Bae, EVP of foundry sales and marketing at Samsung Electronics. “NVIDIA’s EGX platform helps us to extend these manufacturing and design applications smoothly onto our factory floors.”

“At Walmart, we’re using AI to define the future of retail and re-think how technology can further enhance how we operate our stores,” said Mike Hanrahan, CEO of Walmart Intelligent Retail Lab. “With NVIDIA’s EGX edge computing platform, Walmart’s Intelligent Retail Lab is able to bring real-time AI compute to our store, automate processes and free up our associates to create a better and more convenient shopping experience for our customers.”

On the mobile side Ericsson is getting involved to build virtualized 5G RANs on EGX. As you would expect the reason is all about being able to introduce new functions and services more easily and flexibly. More specifically Ericsson hopes the platform will make virtualizing the complete RAN solution cheaper and easier.

“5G is set to turbocharge the intelligent edge revolution,” said Huang. “Fusing 5G, supercomputing, and AI has enabled us to create a revolutionary communications platform supporting, someday, trillions of always-on, AI-enabled smart devices. Combining our world-leading capabilities, Nvidia and Ericsson are helping to invent this exciting future.”

On the software side a key partner for all this virtualized 5G fun will be Red Hat, which is getting its OpenShift Kubernetes container platform involved. It will combine with Nvidia’s own Aerial software developer kit to help operators to make the kind of software-defined RAN tech that can run on EGX.

“The industry is ramping 5G and the ‘smart everything’ revolution is beginning,” said Huang. “Billions of sensors and devices will be sprinkled all over the world enabling new applications and services. We’re working with Red Hat to build a cloud-native, massively scalable, high-performance GPU computing infrastructure for this new 5G world. Powered by the Nvidia EGX Edge Supercomputing Platform, a new wave of applications will emerge, just as with the smartphone revolution.”

Things seemed to have gone a bit quiet on the virtualization front, with NFV, SDN, etc having apparently entered the trough of disillusionment. Nvidia is a substantial cloud player these days, however, and judging by the level of support this new initiative has, EGX could a key factor in moving the telecoms cloud onto the slope of enlightenment.

IBM and Red Hat seal the deal

The $34 billion acquisition of opensource enterprise software vendor Red Hat by venerable tech giant IBM has finally been completed.

The mega M&A was first announced last October and, given the size of it, seems to have gone through relatively quickly. Now begins the significant undertaking of integrating two such massive organisations that may well have quite distinct cultures.

IBM was founded in 1911 and has undergone several transformations to become the enterprise software and services company it is today. Red Hat only came into existence in 1993 and has always focused on the decidedly un-corporate open-source software community. IBM will be hoping some of its youthful vigour and flexibility will rub off, but that remains to be seen.

The official line is that the acquisition makes IBM one of the leading hybrid cloud providers as well as augmenting its software offering. There’s much talk Red Hat’s independence being preserved but, of course, it will now be taking orders from IBM.

“Businesses are starting the next chapter of their digital reinventions, modernizing infrastructure and moving mission-critical workloads across private clouds and multiple clouds from multiple vendors,” said Ginni Rometty, IBM chairman, president and CEO. “They need open, flexible technology to manage these hybrid multicloud environments. And they need partners they can trust to manage and secure these systems.”

“When we talk to customers, their challenges are clear: They need to move faster and differentiate through technology,” said Jim Whitehurst, president and CEO of Red Hat (what’s the difference?). “They want to build more collaborative cultures, and they need solutions that give them the flexibility to build and deploy any app or workload, anywhere.

“We think open source has become the de facto standard in technology because it enables these solutions. Joining forces with IBM gives Red Hat the opportunity to bring more open source innovation to an even broader range of organizations and will enable us to scale to meet the need for hybrid cloud solutions that deliver true choice and agility.”

That’s it really. There’s lots aspirational talk and general banging on in the press release, but you get the gist of it. Whitehurst will join the senior management team and report into Rometty, who seems to possess every senior management position worth having. IBM has been steadily increasing cloud as a proportion of total revenues and the pressure is now on to take that growth to the next level.

It’s Red Hat, but not as we know it

Software vendor Red Hat is celebrating the launch of Enterprise Linux 8 and the approval of its acquisition by IBM with a change of wardrobe.

As arguably the best known company to be named after an item of clothing, the hat itself is central to Red Hat’s brand and image, so any decision to muck about with it, therefore, is not to be taken lightly. But when incoming CMO Tim Yeaton chatted to people about the logo he was distressed to hear they found the dude wearing the hat to be sinister and even evil.

Showing some of the qualities that presumably lead to his promotion Yeaton quickly concluded that having an ‘evil’ logo was a potential marketing liability and dedicated the next year and a half to resolving the matter in an appropriately open source way. This exhaustive process apparently came to a simple conclusion: ditch the dude, resulting in the dude-less logo you see above.

The evolution of the Red Hat logo coincides with a couple of other pretty significant milestones for the company. Tech giant IBM was recently advised that the US Department of Justice has concluded its review of the Red Hat acquisition and said it’s got no problem with it and as far as the US is concerned this is an unconditional green light. IBM apparently reckons the whole thing will be wrapped up later this year.

Lastly Red Hat recently announced the first major new version of its Enterprise Linux platform – RHEL 8. As a platform designed with datacenters in mind, RHEL is of increasing relevance to telcos as they move ever more of their stuff into the cloud and the edge. Red Hat is positioning RHEL 8 as the platform for the hybrid cloud era and name-dropped lots of other associated buzzwords like containers and devops. We wouldn’t even know which end of the box to open with this stuff, so hopefully this vid as well as some canned quotes will help you understand what the big deal is.

 

Stefanie Chiras, vice president and general manager, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat

“Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 embraces the role of Linux as IT’s innovation engine, crystallizing it into an accessible, trusted and more secure platform. Spanning the entirety of the hybrid cloud, the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform provides a catalyst for IT organizations to do more than simply meet today’s challenges; it gives them the foundation and tools to launch their own future, wherever they want it to be.”

Tibor Incze, technical lead, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Datacom Systems

“The capacity for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 to not only run multiple versions of the same application or database on a specific operating system but to also have a clear and efficient way to manage them is a significant benefit to Datacom and our customers. As we continue to execute on our internal DevOps strategy, we’re also pleased to see improved container capabilities in the operating system and extensive automation, all factors that will help us bring differentiated services to our end users.”

John Gossman, distinguished engineer, Microsoft Azure

“We have seen growth in applications being deployed using Red Hat Enterprise Linux on Azure, including Microsoft SQL Server, for cloud-native, hybrid, and cloud migration scenarios. We’re excited to see what customers will create with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 on Azure with continued integrated support from Microsoft and Red Hat, as well as the operating system’s new capabilities to build applications for workloads like AI.”

Arlen Shenkman, executive vice president, Global Business Development and Ecosystems, SAP

“Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8 for SAP Solutions offers high availability capabilities, which are important for SAP workloads, and downtime is unacceptable for business critical applications such as S/4HANA. For more than two decades, we’ve worked with Red Hat on maintaining a stable, open foundation for SAP applications, helping our customers make smarter decisions, faster, across the hybrid cloud.”

Red Hat gives thanks for Turkcell virtualization win

Turkish operator Turkcell has launched a virtualization platform called Unified Telco Cloud that’s based on Red Hat’s OpenStack Platform.

As the name implies this new platform is all about centralising all its services onto a single virtualized infrastructure. This NFVi then allows east selection and implementation of virtual network functions, or so the story goes. Examples of operators going all-in on this stuff are still sufficiently rare for this to be noteworthy.

As a consequence this deal win is also a big deal for Red Hat, which has invested heavily in attacking the telco virtualization market from an open source direction, as is its wont. Red Hat OpenStack Platform is its carrier-grade distribution of the open source hybrid cloud platform. Turkcell is also using Red Hat Ceph Storage, a software-defined storage technology designed for this sort of thing.

“Our goal is to remake Turkcell as a digital services provider, and our business ambitions are global,” said Gediz Sezgin, CTO of Turkcell. “While planning for upcoming 5G and edge computing evolution in our network, we need to increase vendor independence and horizontal scalability to help maximise the efficiency and effectiveness of our CAPEX investment.

“With the Unified Telco Cloud, we want to lower the barrier to entry of our own network to make it a breeding ground for innovation and competition. In parallel, we want to unify infrastructure and decrease operational costs. Red Hat seemed a natural choice of partner given its leadership in the OpenStack community, its interoperability and collaboration with the vendor ecosystem and its business transformation work with other operators.”

Another key partner for Turkcell in this was Affirmed Networks, which specialises in virtualized mobile networks. “We initially selected Affirmed Networks based on their innovation in the area of network transformation and virtualization and their work with some of the world’s largest operators,” said Sezgin.

It’s good to see some of the endlessly hyped promise of NFV actually being put into effect and it will be interesting to see what kind of ROI Turkcell claims to have got from its Unified Telco Cloud. With organisations such as the O-RAN Alliance apparently gathering momentum, open source could be a major theme of this year’s MWC too.

Seven success factors for partnering in the age of open source

Telecoms.com periodically invites third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this piece Susan James, Senior Director of Telecommunications Strategy at Red Hat, explores the ideal balance of in-house and outsourced talent in order to make the most of open source opportunities.

The breadth of technology knowledge that service providers now require has increased exponentially, as the number of employees is stable or in decline in most service providers, and the pool of needed specialist digital talent hasn’t been able to keep pace.

With a more diverse and collaborative ecosystem than ever before, choices are available – but what’s the right balance of making the most of your own talent versus looking externally? Here are several considerations when deciding how, when, and with whom to partner.

  1. Focus on your core business

For most companies, success comes from the core business. You have to closely examine your business and ask what your core business can provide that no one else can.

It’s easy to look at other companies and be tempted to duplicate the way they do things as a template for your own business. However, you need to recognise what’s good about your business, and focus on maximizing those aspects with innovation, rather than trying to replicate what others are doing.

When you know your core business, you can make informed decisions on what to build yourself, where to use external people to solve a problem, and what areas need third party software to do the job.

  1. Diversify to STEAM ahead

With a growing shortfall of specialized digital skills, we need to encourage people to enter emerging technology from outside of the expected STEM fields (science, technology, engineering and maths). Hence the A for ‘arts’ in the emerging term STEAM. We must be open to diverse types of skills and perspectives coming into the industry; they can help us understand the diverse customer base we all have.

In a recent internal meeting, I did a quick straw poll of how many people were engineers – less than half had an engineering background. I myself have an economics degree and ended up as a software product manager. You don’t need an engineering degree to use software, and you don’t need one to understand how to build software. I encourage you to look at your business as a whole, and what different perspectives can bring, when developing software. This applies to hiring as well as team building and partnering.

  1. Choose thought leaders

You have your core strategy and your internal teams. What’s your criteria for choosing who to team up with inside and outside your organization? Thought leadership is a priority, surely. But what makes a thought leader?

I would argue that true thought leadership today is not just someone who can solve today’s technology problems; nor is it painting a technical vision of the future. It’s recognizing the need to shape your organization with the capabilities that enable you to seize unknown opportunities that lie ahead. Red Hat’s CEO Jim Whitehurst calls this ‘organizing for innovation’. He argues that in today’s dynamic environment, planning as we know it is dead. Instead, you must build the mindset and the mechanisms that enable you to move faster and change as needed.

  1. Seek shared philosophy

Ask yourself what kind of partners you want to be associated with, and how you want to be perceived in the market. Move forward with partners whose core values align with yours. For example, as the world moves increasingly towards open source, do you want to be perceived as a leader in upstream* innovation? Do you want to be an active contributor to open source communities and help influence new features that are developed for real world needs? Or, do you desire to be a leader in technology adoption for bringing new capabilities to market? Look for a partner that displays or complements what you want to see in your business.

*Upstream communities are the projects and people that participate in open source software development and are also known as innovation engines.

  1. Prioritize honesty

Some say the measure of a true friend is someone brave enough to tell you the truth, and this can apply in business as well. Some companies aren’t used to openness and honesty that brings – they are accustomed to being told what they want to hear by partners. So when they do hear the truth, it can come as a shock. They may see it as confrontational or they may look for a second meaning.

But being honest and upfront enables companies to grow together. It provides the opportunity to quickly identify threats and know what you’re dealing with, both good and bad. Working in open source communities makes it easier to be honest about deficiencies because everyone can see them. All code is fully exposed and everyone works on the same information and code base, which allows everyone to more easily unite around common causes and problems.

When evaluating potential partners, determine their participation in open source communities, and be clear about the importance of open, honest communication in all business dealings.

  1. Establish clear partner engagement models

A relationship with a partner can be multifaceted. Collaborating in open source development is a separate engagement from working with that same partner on the business side of things, and likely looks quite different.

Upstream communities are all about rapid iteration, creativity, and innovation. Going to market with a product must be about reliability, security, and making sure the product works in practice.

It’s possible for these two areas to overlap: business needs can influence communities in a certain direction, and upstream collaboration between partners can solidify a business relationship. Or, you might work harmoniously with a company upstream, yet go out and compete with each other fiercely on the sales side.

Therefore, be clear from the outset about your engagement models and what constitutes success in each area.  If you are not able to see a “win” for both parties, then long term success of the partnership is questionable.

  1. Understand open source

The proliferation of open source across industries is allowing new players to enter markets, and existing players to work more closely together. There are different ways to leverage open source technologies, and it’s important to understand how different uses impact your business.

Downloading open source software for free doesn’t mean that it doesn’t cost you anything. If you make customizations to that open source software, you need to be aware of what you’re taking on internally. Ensuring that the software is secure ongoing and understanding how to manage the lifecycle takes resources and competence.  Making changes that are not delivered upstream requires you to manage monitoring, maintenance, support, updates (including upstream changes), and the full software lifecycle yourself.

Choosing the supported software route (enterprise version of open source community software) requires you to pay a subscription fee to a software vendor, but it’s the vendor’s job to stabilize the software, certify it works with an ecosystem of other hardware and software, ensure it is safe to use over its lifetime, and provide guidance on the best way to integrate it with the existing environment for the desired results.

Different vendors differ in their level of open source community participation. Vendors that do not contribute all changes back to upstream projects become out of sync with the community version and can no longer take advantage of community innovation.

It’s also important to note that as software development in an area becomes less cutting-edge, people can be less likely to stick around. And unless you’re recognized as a leader in that particular area, it can be hard to attract people. Such might be the challenge for a communications service provider trying to recruit talent for working on containers and competing with companies recognized for container innovation.

This relates back to your core business – what would you rather have your people working on? Where can your internal innovation and differentiation bring you the most value?

Final word

This isn’t a ‘one and done’ process – it’s cyclical. You should continually evaluate your business objectives and results in the context of what’s happening around you, and adjust your approach as you go. Remember too that it’s ok to make mistakes – it’s the mistakes that help you learn for the future. A company that is strategic in the projects it gets involved in, and one that is not afraid to change and drop the projects that aren’t successful is going to be more agile and adaptable to change.

Be open to diverse skill sets, and be honest within your organization and with your partners about what’s working and what’s not. These are all long term strategies that will best position you for success.

 

SusanJamesSusan joined Red Hat in May, 2018, after 27 years at Ericsson, where she was head of Product Line NFV infrastructure. While at Ericsson, she worked in Enterprise, Wireline, Network and Cloud organizations. She worked extensively with the IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS), and was responsible for a number of the network functions in the Ericsson portfolio. A product management veteran, her career has focused on developing products to address technology transitions, and the establishment of new business areas.

How easy will it be for IBM to digest Red Hat?

Imagine our surprise the day before a lunch scheduled with the CTO of Red Hat when IBM announced it was buying his company.

Sometimes the journalism gods, those that are left, smile on even the humblest of hacks and today it was our turn. Lunch with Chris Wright (pictured below, with said hack) had already been arranged with the promise of delivering the kind of light Linux chit-chat over a glass of red that we all secretly crave. But then, out of the blue (pun intended) IBM announced it’s going to buy Red Hat for $34 billion and things suddenly got a bit more spicy.

Now, you don’t get to be the CTO of a major company by speaking injudiciously to the press, so we didn’t expect Wright to have much to say on the relative merits of the acquisition itself. Instead we wanted to know more about what Red Hat brings to the table, such that a venerable tech giant would want to drop such a serious chunk of change on it.

The core of Red Hat’s product strategy for the past few years has been the hybrid cloud. In its simplest terms this refers to the use of both private, on-premise server capacity and the public cloud as found in colossal data centers provided by the likes of AWS, Microsoft and Google. Increasingly this applies to pretty much all larger enterprises so it’s a pretty important place to be if you’re serious about the B2B tech space.

Sharing this writer’s love of a pun, Wright conceded that the cloud is a nebulous term, but that’s why you need companies that have made it their business to get their heads around it, such as Red Hat. IBM is, and always has been, a B2B tech company, so it’s easy to see why it would want to buy a company that specialises in one of the most important and arcane manifestations of that.

Everyone in tech has probably had to puzzle over one of those baffling software architecture slides that attempt to explain how everything fits together via the use of endless rectangles piled on top of each other like some geeky game of Jenga. Throw hundreds of those into a virtualised environment spanning any number of actual physical locations and you get somewhere close to the kind of challenge faced by today’s CTO.

Between the cloud and the cloud user lies an extended value chain of technologies and services dedicated to making that relationship as useful and intuitive as possible. One good example of this is the banking app, through which anyone can now whizz thousands of pounds around the world in an instant. For this to be made possible a hell of a lot of robust technologies have to exist between the bank’s servers and the client device.

According to Wright, Red Hat plays across that whole value chain, so for that reason alone it’s easy to see its appeal to IBM. But Red Hat is also deeply rooted in the Linux, open-source culture, which isn’t necessarily an obvious fit with IBM’s notoriously rigid corporate philosophy. As with so much M&A, how effectively the cultures of the two organisations are reconciled will be the single most important factor in determining whether this deal goes down smoothly or results in corporate indigestion.

Chris Wright Red Hat Telecoms

IBM aims to boost its strategic imperatives with $34 billion acquisition of Red Hat

IBM has announced by far the largest acquisition in its history with the acquisition of cloud and open source software vendor Red Hat.

$34 billion is several times more than IBM has previously spent on an acquisition, which indicates just how important it thinks this is to its future prosperity. Red Hat has expanded from a developer of Linux-based business software to being involved in most places you might find B2B open source software, including the cloud and telecoms.

While most venerable tech companies seem to be in a constant state of so-called transformation, this has especially been the case with IBM as it seeks to replace its declining legacy businesses with shiny new ones. As a consequence it has four clear strategic imperatives in the form of cloud, security, analytics and mobile, revenue from which recently overtook legacy stuff for the first time.

But IBM has apparently decided this organic transformation isn’t happening quickly enough and has decided a nice, juicy bit of M&A is required to hasten the process. Most reports are focusing on how Red Hat will contribute to IBM’s hybrid cloud efforts, and thus give it a boost in competing with the likes of Amazon, but Red Hat’s activities in the telco cloud specifically shouldn’t be underplayed.

“The acquisition of Red Hat is a game-changer,” hyperbolised IBM Dictator (Chairman, President and CEO) Ginni Rometty. “It changes everything about the cloud market. IBM will become the world’s number one hybrid cloud provider, offering companies the only open cloud solution that will unlock the full value of the cloud for their businesses.

“Most companies today are only 20 percent along their cloud journey, renting compute power to cut costs,” she said. “The next 80 percent is about unlocking real business value and driving growth. This is the next chapter of the cloud. It requires shifting business applications to hybrid cloud, extracting more data and optimizing every part of the business, from supply chains to sales.”

IBM Red Hat Rometty Whitehurst cropped

“Open source is the default choice for modern IT solutions, and I’m incredibly proud of the role Red Hat has played in making that a reality in the enterprise,” said Jim Whitehurst, President and CEO, Red Hat (pictured, with Rometty). “Joining forces with IBM will provide us with a greater level of scale, resources and capabilities to accelerate the impact of open source as the basis for digital transformation and bring Red Hat to an even wider audience –  all while preserving our unique culture and unwavering commitment to open source innovation.”

Cloud and open source have been major themes in the tech M&A scene recently. Microsoft continued its transition from closed software box-shifter with the recent $7.5 billion acquisition of code sharing platform GitHub. Meanwhile open source big data vendors Cloudera and Hortonworks have decided to merge and earlier this year Salsforce dropped $6.5 billion on MuleSoft to power its Integration Cloud.

In M&A, the party line from the company being acquired is usually something along the lines of it enabling them to take the next step in its evolution thanks to the greater resources of its new parent, and this was no exception. “Powered by IBM, we can dramatically scale and accelerate what we are doing today,” said Whitehurst in his email to staff announcing the deal. “Imagine Red Hat with greater resources to grow into the opportunity ahead of us. Imagine Red Hat with the ability to invest even more and faster to accelerate open source innovation in emerging areas.” And so on.

He went on to explain that, while he will report directly to Rometty, Red Hat will continue to operate as a ‘distinct unit’, whatever that means. Usually this sort of talk is designed to sell the concept that it will remain the same company it was before the acquisition, but with loads more cash to play with. Let’s see.

IBM would be mad to mess around with Red Hat too much as it seems to be doing just fine and reported 14% revenue growth in its last quarterlies. Then again you don’t pay a 60% premium for a company just to accrue its revenue and how IBM integrates Red Hat into the rest of its offerings will be what determines the success of this bold move. There are, sadly, no signs the company plans to change its name to Big Blue Hat, which is a worrying early a missed opportunity.

We’re getting closer to the NFV promised land

Talking with Red Hat and Netscout at MWC 2018 reveals that NFV seems to be finally getting there, and not a moment too soon.

From Red Hat EMEA we met Timo Jokiaho, Principal Technologist for Telco (right, above), and Nik Stankau, Business Development Director for Telco (left). Red Hat makes its money from fine-tuning open source software to make it commercial-grade, so it’s in a good position to comment on the state of the software being developed to make everything work – the plumbing if you like – as we move into the 5G era.

They explained that, within Europe at least, France is setting the pace when it comes to NFV development – especially Orange and SFR. Apparently the arrive of Free Mobile a few years ago, and the resulting trashing of margins, motivated the incumbent operators to look harder for efficiencies and one source of those is expected to be NFV.

The flexibility, scalability and ability to innovate that is promised by NFV will be a big part of this. One more specific subset will be Media Function Virtualization, which will offer flexibility when it comes to the use of resources for video provision. This seems to be a refinement of the network slicing concept that will allow dynamic allocation of network resources at times of peak video usage.

As you might expect from Red Hat, they think a big reason for the progress they observe is the non-proprietary approach that is facilitated by open source. Operators are increasingly taking control of the process away from traditional vendors, especially when it comes to orchestration. They also noted that containers are set to be a major factor in the next phase of development of the telecoms plumbing.

Over at Netscout we met Richard Kenedi, President of the New Markets Business Unit, and Petrit Nahi, Chief RAN Scientist. They explained that business assurance specialist Netscout has been accelerating in the telco direction with the help of acquisitions such as Arbor Networks. Thanks to its network and service assurance work Netscout feels in a good position to comment on the state of the network.

They confirmed that NFV is definitely getting there and that the increased focus we’re seeing as 5G gets nearer is forcing practical action upon the industry. Initially CSPs are likely to focus a lot on capacity, and fixed-wireless access seems to be getting a lot more traction thanks to good R&D on millimetre-wave propagation. Meanwhile the low-latency part of the 5G equation is leading to a lot of talk about mobile-edge computing.

The third pillar is IoT and Netscout confirmed our previous finding that it’s all about NB-IoT now. They confirmed that there is a lot of CSP activity around NB-IoT and that the activity is largely moving from B2C to B2B implementations and business models. They also said network slicing will be a critical factor in taking IoT to the next level. Lastly they confirmed the vibe we got from a lot of other people at the show that the overall market will bottom-out this year and then start to pick up.

As with so much else at MWC 2018 the perspective from a couple of companies involved in the plumbing of the network was a sense of ramping and practical measures being taken in preparation for 5G in 2019 and beyond. Which is just as well as, unless we get that stuff right, all the clever New Radio in the world won’t amount to much.

Elisa is proud of its efficient SON

Finnish operator Elisa is so happy with its self-organising network tech, developed with Red Hat, that it wants the whole world to know about it.

Elisa is quite big on uncapped data tariffs and as a consequence experiences disproportionately high volumes of traffic over its network. This has led it to make a special effort to make its network more efficient, which is where SON comes in. Developed on Red Hat’s OpenShift Container Platform, Elisa SON claims to double the user data throughput on the existing network.

“Our automated network optimization solution offers operators both operating and capital expenditure savings,” said Elisa CTO Kalle Lehtinen. “For example, in Elisa’s own network in Finland, the software actively monitors and tests the network, making more than two million tests and 2,000 changes on daily basis. Less resource-intensive manual work is required and the existing investments can be fully utilized.”

“With Elisa’s approach offering unlimited data plans to subscribers, its networks carry a high volume of mobile data, meaning it has focused on optimising network performance and getting maximum value out of its existing equipment,” said Santiago Madruga, head of Telco and ICT EMEA at Red Hat. “Thanks to this drive, it has developed innovative SON capabilities. We are proud to collaborate closely with Elisa to deliver SON on Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform.”

This is obviously a PR coup for Red Hat too, especially since, in its briefing documents, Elisa speaks about having tried various off-the-shelf vendor SON solutions but couldn’t find anything that did the job well enough. This is also yet another example of operators growing frustrated with the vendor community and taking more ownership of overcoming their technological challenges themselves, and now Elisa has a product it can sell on to other operators too.