Q2 smartphones: Samsung grows, Huawei slows and Apple flows

The latest global smartphone shipment numbers reveal a return to growth for Samsung, a major reduction in growth for Huawei and transition for Apple.

As you can see from the table below, Q2 2019 marked the first quarter in which Samsung registered year-on-year smartphone shipment growth for the first time in almost two years, in an overall market that continues to contract. One of the reasons for this could be the Galaxy S10 being better received than its predecessor as well as it being the main early 5G phone.

“Samsung shipped 76.3 million smartphones worldwide in Q2 2019, jumping 7% annually from 71.5 million units in Q2 2018. Samsung has lifted its global smartphone marketshare from 20% to 22% in the past year,” said Neil Mawston of analyst firm Strategy Analytics. “Strong sales in midrange and entry segments increased Samsung’s shipments, but its profit margin declined due to fierce price competition.”

While Huawei’s smartphone shipments continued to grow, it was at a much slower rate than for the past couple of years, but that was still a considerable achievement all things considered. “Huawei captured a healthy 17 percent global smartphone marketshare in Q2 2019, up from 15 percent a year ago,” said Mawston. “Huawei surged at home in China during the quarter, as the firm sought to offset regulatory uncertainty in other major regions such as North America and Western Europe.”

Apple iPhone shipments declined for the third quarter in a row, as Apple continues to diversify in favour of services such that iPhones accounted for less than half of total Apple revenues for the first quarter ever. “Apple iPhone shipments fell 8 percent annually, making it the worst performer among the world’s big-five smartphone players,” said Woody Oh of SA. “Apple is stabilizing in China due to price adjustments and buoyant trade-ins, but other major markets such as India and Europe remain challenging for the expensive iPhone.”

The rest of the table is all about the Chinese vendors, all of whom saw flat year-on-year growth. “Oppo took fifth position with 9 percent global smartphone marketshare during the quarter, holding steady from 9 percent share a year ago,” said SA’s Lindi Sui. “Oppois expanding hard into Western Europe, with new models like the Reno 5G, but it is coming under pressure at home in China from a resurgent Huawei.” Lucky Western Europe.

Talking of Chinese vendors, Counterpoint Research has identified massive growth from a new brand called Realme, which managed to ship almost five million units, having only started a year ago. Realme seems to specialize in the sub-premium category, in common with OnePlus, which is also owned by Shenzhen-based BBK Electronics, along with Oppo, but the focus of Realme’s hard expansion seems to be India.

q2 2019 smartphones

Global smartphone shipments plunge to lowest level since 2014

The decline of the global smartphone market continues but nobody sent Huawei the memo as it raced past Apple into second place.

According to Strategy Analytics, from which we derive the majority of our smartphone numbers below, 330.4 million smartphone units were shipped in Q1 2019. This represented a year-on-year decline of 4% and marked the lowest quarterly total since Q3 2014. Among the vendors Apple was the biggest loser and was easily overtaken for second place by Huawei thanks to remarkable 50% year-on-year shipment growth.

“The global smartphone market has declined again on an annual basis, but the fall is less severe than before, and this was the industry’s best performance for three quarters,” said SA’s Linda Sui. “Global smartphone shipments are finally showing signs of stabilizing, due to relatively improved demand in major markets like China. The outlook for later this year is improving.”

“Huawei surged 50% annually and outgrew all major rivals to ship 59.1 million smartphones worldwide during Q1 2019, up from 39.3 million in Q1 2018,” said Neil Mawston of SA. “Huawei captured a record 18 percent global smartphone marketshare in Q1 2019. Huawei is closing in on Samsung and streaking ahead of Apple, due to its strong presence across China, Western Europe and Africa.”

“Apple iPhone shipped 43.1 million units to capture 13 percent global smartphone marketshare in Q1 2019, dipping from 15 percent a year ago,” said Woody Oh of SA. “Apple lost ground in China during the quarter and is struggling to make headway in price-sensitive India. However, decent price cuts in China and India during recent weeks indicate the iPhone will bounce back slightly in those two countries in the next quarter.”

While shipments might be going down the toilet, the total value of those shipments seems to be stable thanks to increasing average selling prices. “By revenue, the situation is healthier, due to higher average prices (like expensive iPhones),” said Mawston. “Global revenue today is broadly around the same level as the average quarter last year.”

smartphone shipments q1 2019

Huawei forecast to have narrow advantage in 5G RAN race

Analyst firm Strategy Analytics has taken a look at the runners and riders in the global 5G race and has Huawei ahead of its rivals by a nose.

In a report titled ‘Comparison and 2023 5G Global Market Potential for leading 5G RAN Vendors – Ericsson, Huawei and Nokia’, SA took a look at the relative competitiveness of the big three kit vendors when it comes to 5G radio access network kit and made some market share forecasts accordingly.

The long and short of it, as you can see in the first table below, is that SA reckons by 2023 Huawei will account for around a quarter of the 5G RAN market, while Ericsson and Nokia will have closer to 23%. On top of that the ‘others’, largely Samsung and ZTE, will account for almost 30% between them, which is a decent effort. Samsung seems to be doing especially well in South Korea, funnily enough.

SA 5G RAN chart

“By 2023 5G looks to be a very competitive global market as this premium technology finally achieves economies of scale that will drive down the costs per Gigabyte of throughput to make 5G an affordable technology on a global basis,” said Phil Kendall of SA. “The neck and neck battle between Huawei, Ericsson and Nokia for share of 2023’s 5G radio access should lower costs for all segments of mobile, IoT and fixed 5G applications, even as smaller new vendors find specific niches below these three.”

The report also digs down into the strengths and weaknesses of the big three vendors. Specifically it looks at five broad categories: R&D, patents, product portfolio, product performance and deployment support. The bad news for the Nordic vendors is that Huawei comes top in all five categories, only having to share that spot with the other in the case of product portfolio. It looks like Ericsson needs to start putting its hand in its pocket and Nokia wants to take on a few more engineers.

SA 5G RAN comparison

“R&D investment backed by market scale is the most crucial factor for the long term competitiveness of 5G infrastructure vendors,” said SA’s Guang Yang. “Huawei has maintained steady growth in its 5G R&D investment, which bodes well for long term advances in energy efficient, cost effective 5G technology.”

With all that in mind it’s kind of surprising SA doesn’t anticipate a bigger lead for Huawei in four years’ time. The reason, presumably, is that Huawei will be excluded from a bunch of markets thanks to all the US aggro it faces. Opinion seems to be divided about how much slack will be picked up by Chinese sales, with Huawei revealing it has yet to do any 5G deals in mainland China, but the analyst in the video below still seeing that country as a big competitive advantage for them.

 

Prepaid market is an operator blind spot – research

Some new research commissioned by mobile financial services company Juvo has concluded operators are wasting loads of cash through prepaid churn.

The research was conducted by Strategy Analytics, which is having a busy day. It took a look at eight prepaid-dominant markets: Argentina, Brazil, India, Malaysia, Mexico, the Philippines, South Africa and Thailand; and concluded that in these markets alone, operators wasted $670 million last year replacing lost prepaid subscribers.

Otherwise known as PAYG or contract-free, the prepaid market probably gets a bit overlooked in developed markets as there’s nothing operators like more than signing someone up to a nice, fat two year contract. But as well as being a big piece of the action in developed markets, it tends to dominate developing ones.

Now, on one level remarking that churn is an issue in a market with no contractual obligation involved seems like a bit of a redundant statement. Of course punters are going to shop around and exhibit minimal loyalty. But the apparent point of Juvo commissioning this study is to show there are still plenty of things that could be done to efficiently reduce this churn.

It should also be noted that Juvo, in common with all other companies, doesn’t tend to just commission surveys for a laugh. It contends that what it has to offer can help operators with this prepaid lack of stickiness and has consistently messaged on the matter of prepaid churn. But that said, the findings of this study still have independent merit.

Prepaid accounted for 71% (5.7 billion) of global mobile connections and 32% ($265 billion) in service revenues in 2018. In developing economies those numbers move strongly in the direction of prepaid, for example is accounts for 94% of connections and 80% of revenue in Africa. SA also says it’s more profitable than you might think, with EBITDA margins of 40-55% in developing markets (apart from India, where Jio has thrown a spanner in the works).

SA Juvo 1

This background is designed to set up the punchline which is, of course, churn. The second chart below shows monthly prepaid churn of 3.1-6.5% across the countries studied. This equates to 37-80% annually meaning that, on average, operators have to totally replace their prepaid subscriber base every couple of years.

SA Juvo 2

“Until now, the industry has been in the dark on the scale of the costs associated with prepaid mobile churn, and the portion of prepaid OPEX spent on reacquiring the same customers,” said Phil Kendall of SA, the author of the report. “What this research allows us to do is to confidently calculate the profit that can be unlocked when prepaid churn is reduced. Success in the highly volatile, promotion-fueled prepaid market will go to those operators who can improve customer loyalty, allowing them to make strategic choices between OPEX reduction, accelerated growth or investment in service differentiation.”

“The market opportunity here is 5.7 billion customers and over $265 billion in annual revenue,” said said Steve Polsky, CEO of Juvo. “However it is hampered by huge churn and missed opportunities. As an industry, we need to talk about prepaid, we need to change our approach and we need to put identity at its heart. Prepaid customers in emerging markets consistently churn because they are constantly told ‘no’. No you’re out of airtime. No you don’t have enough money. We have to start with ‘yes’.”

The report, called ‘Death by a thousand nos’, offers a deeper dive into the prepaid churn issue, as well as some top tips on what to do about it, and can be downloaded from the Juvo website. With a major driver of the postpaid demand – the smartphone market – in significant decline, it seems likely that prepaid will become a bigger deal for all operators. So it’s probably a good idea to start thinking about how to make the most of it.

UK and US smartphone markets in steep decline

The latest numbers from industry trackers Strategy Analytics reveal UK smartphone shipments fell 14% in Q4 2018.

The main culprit seems to be UK smartphone market leader Apple, which seems to be having a bit of a nightmare all over the world right now. Apple shipped 700,000 fewer iPhones in Q4 2018 than it did in the year ago quarter, which is a drop of 19%. Second placed Samsung suffered a similar decline, dropping 400k shipments. This placed Huawei actually managed to increase its shipments by 200k, which meant it stole a big chunk of market share from the big two.

“Despite fear of trade wars and Brexit, Huawei has cracked the UK smartphone market,” SA’s Neil Mawston told Telecoms.com. “If current growth trends continue, Huawei will overtake Samsung as the number two UK smartphone player later this year. Samsung’s UK smartphone marketshare has halved in the past five years, and it must take urgent steps to arrest the decline, before it is too late, but he ‘big 3′ brands still made up three in four of all smartphones sold in the UK last year.”

“UK smartphone shipments declined 14 percent annually from 8.5 million units in Q4 2017 to 7.3 million in Q4 2018,” said Rajeev Nair of SA. “United Kingdom is the largest smartphone market in Western Europe and it is suffering from weak sales, due to longer replacement rates, a lack of wow designs, and Brexit uncertainty causing consumers to hold off on some new purchases.”

“Samsung clung on to second place with 19 percent smartphone marketshare in the UK during Q4 2018, down from 21 percent a year ago,” said Woody Oh of SA. “Samsung is facing intense competitive pressure from Huawei, who is targeting Samsung’s core segments in the midrange and premium-tier with popular models such as the P20. Huawei’s UK smartphone marketshare has leapt from 8 percent in Q4 2017 to 12 percent in Q4 2018. Huawei is growing fast in the UK, due to heavy co-marketing of its models with major carriers like EE.”

 

UK Smartphone Shipments (Millions of Units) Q4 ’17 Q4 ’18 Growth YoY (%)
Apple 3.7 3.0 -19%
Samsung 1.8 1.4 -22%
Huawei 0.7 0.9 36%
Others 2.3 2.0 -15%
Total 8.5 7.3 -14%
UK Smartphone Vendor Marketshare (%) Q4 ’17 Q4 ’18
Apple 43.5% 41.1%
Samsung 21.2% 19.2%
Huawei 7.8% 12.3%
Others 27.5% 27.4%
Total 100.0% 100.0%
Source: Strategy Analytics

SA has also been looking at the US market recently and while the shipment decline is even worse on the other side of the pond, seems that Google’s Pixel brand is starting to get some serious traction over there.

“Google’s Pixel 3 range benefited from weakness at Apple, Samsung, ZTE and others,” blogged Mawston. “Apple saw longer replacement rates, due to its battery-replacement program encouraging owners to hold on to existing iPhones for longer. Samsung struggled, due to soft sales of the flagship Galaxy S9 model. ZTE was shunned by authorities and carriers and demand for its smartphones collapsed. Google Pixel 3 is starting to resonate with US consumers who are searching for something new, such as eSIM connectivity or AI.

SA Q4 2018 US smartphone chart

Smartphone market continues to plunge, with Samsung worst hit

Samsung’s smartphone shipments have declined for the past four quarters and the overall market has followed.

At the same time Huawei continues to go from strength to strength. Annual smartphone shipment growth of 41% allowed Huawei to take second place in the global rankings last quarter and 32% growth this quarter was enough to keep Apple at bay once more. Samsung’s shipments declined by 13% this quarter and if these trends keep up Huawei could grab the top spot before long – a previously unthinkable event.

“Global smartphone shipments tumbled 8 percent annually from 393.1 million units in Q3 2017 to 360.0 million in Q3 2018,” said Linda Sui of analyst firm Strategy Analytics. “The global smartphone market has now declined for four consecutive quarters and is effectively in a recession. The smartphone industry is struggling to come to terms with heavily diminished carrier subsidies, longer replacement rates, inventory buildup in several regions, and a lack of exciting hardware design innovation.”

“Samsung is losing ground to Huawei, Xiaomi and other Chinese rivals in the huge China and India markets,” said Neil Mawston of SA. “Samsung must solve its China and India problems before it is too late. Huawei remains the world’s second largest smartphone vendor with 14 percent share. Huawei has little presence in the valuable North America market, but its Android models are wildly popular in most of the rest of the world, particularly Asia and Europe.”

One interesting twist to the numbers was Apple’s decision to stop reporting shipment numbers from next quarter onwards. Since this is always its strongest quarter you have to wonder what Apple is playing at. “Starting with the December quarter, we will no longer be providing unit sales data for iPhone, iPad and Mac,” said Apple CFO Luca Maestri on the earnings call. “As we have stated many times, our objective is to make great products and services that enrich people’s lives, and to provide an unparalleled customer experience so that our users are highly satisfied, loyal and engaged.

“As we accomplish these objectives, strong financial results follow. As demonstrated by our financial performance in recent years, the number of units sold in any 90-day period is not necessarily representative of the underlying strength of our business. Furthermore, a unit of sale is less relevant for us today than it was in the past, given the breadth of our portfolio and the wider sales price dispersion within any given product line.”

Fair enough but the market will be the judge of how relevant Apple’s unit shipment numbers are. Companies like Strategy Analytics will still publish estimates and journalists will still write about them. Apple was one of the few smartphone vendors that still published its numbers so maybe it has decided, as has LG, to get in line with its competitors on this, with the overall declines in the smartphone market possibly contributing to that decision. But the weak reasoning offered above will leave many unanswered questions in the minds of investors.

Smartphones Q3 2018

Amazon loosens tight grip on smart speaker market

New estimates from Strategy Analytics have Amazon maintaining its lead in the smart speaker market, but it’s starting to erode as more mainstream brands hit the market.

Being first to market has its advantages, but these leads are rarely maintained. Getting a jump on the early adopters of course offers a massive advantage, but more often than not the money is made in mainstream market penetration. Unfortunately for those who attempt to use the first-to-market strategy as a means to break the status quo, Joe and Jane Bloggs on the street usually revert to brands they are comfortable with.

“Amazon and Google accounted for a 69% share of global smart speaker shipments in Q2 2018 down from over 90% in Q2 2017,” said David Watkins of Strategy Analytics. “The drop is not only a reflection of growing competition in the smart speaker market but also Amazon and Google’s inability to break into the fast growing Chinese market that is dominated by local powerhouse brands such as Alibaba, JD.com and Baidu.”

Looking at the estimates, Strategy Analytics believes Amazon’s global smart speaker share of shipments fell to 41% in Q2 2018 from 44% in Q1 and 76% in Q2 2017. Google has increased its share to 28% in Q2 2018, up from 16% during the same period last year, while technology giants Apple and Samsung are intensifying competition, as are more traditional audio brands such as Sonos and Bose.

Amazon and Google are still the dominant players as it stands, though companies like Apple and Samsung, both of whom made their names in the hardware space, will test out brand loyalty with their own products. That said, consumers in the mainstream market, the majority who have more basic understanding of the technology industry, will like lean towards brands such as Sonos and Bose. These are common names in the audio market already and brands people have been buying for years; reputation and credibility means a lot for consumer purchases.

With the two market disruptors starting to flag out front, we suspect market share will gradually become more even, with Amazon and Google eventually falling back further. But do they actually care?

We’ve said this before, but these are two companies which do not have an outstanding pedigree in the hardware markets. It has not been a cash-cow for the pair, who have both focused on software and services. We believe this will be the long-term focus of both Amazon and Google.

Launching low-cost devices onto the market and capturing the attention of the highly-vocal tech enthusiasts was an excellent move. It normalised the products and demonstrated to the traditional manufacturers there is money to be made in smart speakers. Now the rest of the industry are playing catch-up, some might suggest it is mission accomplished. The pair can go back to focusing on the aspects which they are more comfortable with.

Both Amazon and Google make cash through the desires of consumers to have more of their lives online. They operate in the virtual world, making money off the ecosystem and creating free services which are attractive to the consumer. In Google’s cash it is the search engine, as well as video platforms and mapping products. For Amazon, it’s the dominant eCommerce platform, and more recently it has been venturing into subscriptions. For both the idea is simple; create an idea which is user friendly, before making money off the connection between consumers and third-parties.

The same business model is possible in the smart speaker world. Whether it is referrals for a takeaway or ordering weekly groceries, Amazon and Google can make money off the digital experience, not simply selling devices to consumers.

The issue to start with that the devices weren’t present in homes around the world, but that hurdle seems to have been conquered. With the products gathering momentum, the mission of normalising day-to-day uses of the virtual assistants can begin. This is where Amazon and Google will make billions in recurring revenues.

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Google, Alibaba and Apple erode Amazon’s smart speaker dominance

Research firm Strategy Analytics has published its latest numbers on the global smart speaker market and they reveal rapid growth and diversification.

Amazon, of course, was the first mover in this market with its Alexa-driven speakers sold aggressively through its own dominant retail channel. As you can see from the table below it pretty much owned the smart speaker market a year ago, but the situation is very different today. With Google, Alibaba and Apple among the tech giants to have made their move in that time.

“Amazon and Google accounted for a dominant 70% share of global smart speaker shipments in Q1 2018 although their combined share has fallen from 84% in Q4 2017 and 94% in the year ago quarter,” said David Watkins of SA. “This is partly as a result of strong growth in the Chinese market for smart speakers where both Amazon and Google are currently absent. Alibaba and Xiaomi are leading the way in China and their strength in the domestic market alone is proving enough to propel them into the global top five.”

“Further strong growth in smart speaker sales confirms our view that this new market is far more than just a flash in the pan,” said David Mercer of SA. “Today’s smart speakers are by no means the finished article but they have captured the consumer imagination and we will see rapid evolution in design, functionality and associated use cases over the coming years. We are clearly heading towards to a time in the not too distant future when voice becomes a standard mode of technology interaction alongside established approaches like keyboard, mouse and touchscreen.”

Mercer is spot on about the voice UI, although it could end up being most important in cars and wearables, rather than the living room. It’s also worth juxtaposing this market with smartphones, which amounted to 345 million units in Q1 2018. While the young smart speaker market is growing rapidly, it’s still a faction of the size of smartphones and is unlikely to ever achieve those kinds of volumes because of its relatively limited utility.

Global Smart Speaker Market by Vendor: Q1 2018 (Shipments in Millions of Units)
Vendor Q1 ’18 Shipments Q1 ’18 Market Share Q1 ’17 Shipments Q1 ’17 Market Share Growth Y/Y
Amazon 4.0 43.6% 2.0 81.8% 102%
Google 2.4 26.5% 0.3 12.4% 709%
Alibaba 0.7 7.6% 0.0 0.0% ~
Apple 0.6 6.0% 0.0 0.0% ~
Xiaomi 0.2 2.4% 0.0 0.0% ~
Others 1.3 13.9% 0.1 5.8% 806%
Totals 9.2 100.0% 2.4 100.0% 278%
Source: Strategy Analytics Smart Speaker service

Apple sold 16 million iPhone X in Q1 – far more than any other smartphone model

Research firm Strategy Analytics reckons Apple managed to shift 16 million units of its flagship smartphone last quarter, defying pessimistic reports.

At the start of this week we reported on a rumour that Apple had significantly cut order for the X with its manufacturers because it was struggling to shift what it already had. That rumour turned out to be pretty much rubbish when Apple announced solid numbers a couple of days later and SA’s estimate serve to reinforce that impression.

“We estimate the Apple iPhone X shipped 16.0 million units and captured 5 percent market share worldwide in Q1 2018,” said Juha Winter of SA. “For the second quarter running, the iPhone X remains the world’s most popular smartphone model overall, due to a blend of good design, sophisticated camera, extensive apps, and widespread retail presence for the device.

“Apple has now shifted almost 50 million iPhone X units worldwide since commercial launch in November 2017. The Apple iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus shipped 12.5 and 8.3 million units, respectively, for second and third place. The previous-generation iPhone 7 shipped a respectable 5.6 million units for fourth place. Combined together, Apple today accounts for four of the world’s six most popular smartphone models.”

You might expect the rest of the list to be occupied by the Samsung but you would be sorely mistaken. The fifth best-selling smartphone model globally was the Xiaomi Redmi 5A, which is not a bad effort considering that’s mainly direct (as opposed to operator-subsidised) sales. Let’s see if Xiaomi’s strategic alliance with Hutchison helps it climb the table further. Then, finally, comes the Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus which, to be fair, hasn’t been shipping for long.

Linda Sui, Director at Strategy Analytics, added, “Xiaomi has become wildly popular across India and China,” Said SA’s Linda Sui. “Xiaomi is selling a huge volume of smartphones through online channels, with key retail partners including Flipkart and JD.”

“Samsung’s new flagships, Galaxy S9 and S9 Plus, only started shipping toward the end of the first quarter, but shipments are already off to a very good start,” said SA’s Woody Oh. “We expect the S9 Plus to become the best-selling Android smartphone globally in the second quarter of 2018.”

Global Smartphone Shipments by Model (Millions of Units) Q1 ’17 Q1 ’18
1.  Apple iPhone X 0.0 16.0
2.  Apple iPhone 8 0.0 12.5
3.  Apple iPhone 8 Plus 0.0 8.3
4.  Apple iPhone 7 21.5 5.6
5.  Xiaomi Redmi 5A 0.0 5.4
6.  Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus 0.0 5.3
Rest of Total Market 332.3 292.3
Total 353.8 345.4
Global Smartphone Marketshare by Model (% of Total) Q1 ’17 Q1 ’18
1.  Apple iPhone X 0.0% 4.6%
2.  Apple iPhone 8 0.0% 3.6%
3.  Apple iPhone 8 Plus 0.0% 2.4%
4.  Apple iPhone 7 6.1% 1.6%
5.  Xiaomi Redmi 5A 0.0% 1.6%
6.  Samsung Galaxy S9 Plus 0.0% 1.5%
Rest of Total Market 93.9% 84.6%
Total 100.0% 100.0%
Total Growth YoY (%) 6.2% -2.4%
Source: Strategy Analytics

 

SA is having a busy week, having published its Q1 2018 tablet shipment numbers too. Apple is doing nicely in that area too, shifting almost twice as many units as second-placed Samsung in a declining market.

“Leading vendors are bouncing back with new hardware and value-added features such as improved stylus capabilities, AR, and digital assistants to support new use cases and double down on their appeal consumer and enterprise markets,” said SA’s Chirag Upadhyay. “Our interactions with computing devices are rapidly changing and companies like Apple, Amazon, and Huawei are staying ahead of the curve with targeted product improvements.”

SA tablets Q1 2018

Smartphone market Q1 2018: Apple is doing just fine

Amid rumours that sales of its flagship smartphone have disappointed, Apple posted yet another set of impressive numbers.

The past few weeks saw a bunch of stories all claiming to have insight into the Apple supply chain, suggesting that the flagship iPhone X hasn’t been selling in anything near the volumes Apple was hoping for. Apparently it’s too expensive and the screen is too fragile.

Well Apple’s Q1 2018 numbers pretty much contradict those rumours, with Apple shifting 52.2 million iPhones in the quarter, a 3% increase on the year-ago quarter. Apple doesn’t publish splits by model, but iPhone revenues were up were up 14% annually, indicating an increased average selling price, which seems likely to be due to the X.

“Apple iPhone shipments have grown year-on-year in three of the past 4 quarters,” said Neil Mawston of Strategy Analytics, from whom we derive much of the data in our smartphone shipment table. Apple’s ultra-premium iPhone X is proving relatively popular in some markets like China and the US, while there remains scope for additional expansion in emerging regions such as India and Africa.”

The other story of the quarter is the continued overall decline of the global smartphone market, with shipments falling by 2%, having fallen a fair bit in the previous quarter too. A lot of the reason for this will be China, which everyone seems to agree is in relatively steep decline, but it looks like replacement cycles are lengthening in developed markets too.

Q1 2018 smartphone table


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