NBC’s opportunity to cut through the streaming noise with Olympics

With NBCUniversal set to launch its own streaming service in 2020 the risk of content fragmentation is becoming more apparent, but this only underlines the importance of a niche.

Although many of these streaming services might think they are doing something innovative or novel, in reality they are copycatting Netflix. The big issue is that Netflix is already moving onto the bigger and better. Original content is the new frontier, though NBCUniversal might have stumbled across another unique selling point.

“Peacock will be the go-to place for both the timely and timeless – from can’t-miss Olympic moments and the 2020 election, to classic fan favourites like The Office,” said Bonnie Hammer, Chairman of Direct-to-Consumer and Digital Enterprises business unit.

The Olympics, and live streaming sport on the whole, is an area which the streaming giants have largely ignored to date. Amazon has dabbled with tennis, NFL and has a few English Premier League games for the 2019/20 season, while Twitter (admittedly not a streaming service) has got a partnership in place with the PGA Tour. YouTube has toyed with some live events, but never nailed it. It’s a bit sporadic, rather than a coherent assault.

With the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, NBCUniversal has a great opportunity to carve a niche and create a unique position in streaming ecosystem.

Through the NBC Olympic channel, the company has produced every Summer Olympics since Seoul in 1988 and every Winter Olympics since Salt Lake City in 2002. It has all media rights on all platforms to all Olympic Games through to 2032, paying $7.75 billion (US rights) in 2014.

This is a major attraction for consumers around the world and could form the central cog of a new type of streaming service if the team plays its cards right. Olympics coverage averaged 27.5 million viewers across all platforms, with streaming growing particularly. Nearly more than 2.71 billion minutes of coverage was streaming from the Rio Olympics, more than double the previous two events combined.

This is what the new streaming challengers need to understand; they cannot replicate the success of Netflix.

Disruptors to a fast-evolving ecosystem often try to do this and it fails due to the rapidly changing landscape. Netflix found success in being a content aggregator, bringing together titles from a variety of different sources. This model is dead. It cannot be replicated.

The creation of Peacock is another sign of content fragmentation. From next year onwards, Netflix viewers will no-longer be able to view titles such as ‘The Office’, ‘Parks and Recreation’, ‘Brooklyn Nine-nine’ and ‘30 Rock’. This is a consequence of each of the newly emerging platforms. When HBO Max emerged, Netflix lost ‘Friends’, ‘The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air’ and ‘Pretty Little Liars’. With Disney+, all Marvel content will be removed from the Netflix library.

This is a dangerous position for any challengers. The Netflix model is dead because everyone wants to home their content exclusively. The value to the consumer of the aggregator model which drove Netflix in the early years is dwindling away as the content landscape becomes increasingly fragmented.

This is the importance of original content for the streaming services; it allows the creation of a selling-point beyond price. Admittedly, the Netflix original content will not appeal to everyone, but it has big enough budgets to create the breadth and depth, so each show does not have to be a catch-all, mass market product. Anyone who thinks they can compete with Netflix on original content will have to spend a lot of money to do so.

With coverage of the 2020 Election and the Tokyo Olympics on the NBCUniversal streaming platform, there is a notable opportunity to create a proposition which can cut through the noise.

Another very interesting opportunity for NBCUniversal is a fast-emerging trend in the content world; interactivity. This was a notable theme at IBC 2019, and sports presents an opportunity like few other genres.

Viewers could personalise their experience through the selection of different cameras or commentators. Value add content can be generated for months prior to the live-streaming of the event. Technologies such as virtual and augmented reality have a natural home in the sports ecosystem. Partnerships can be developed for additional monetization. There are endless troves of data points to engage every niche of viewer. The opportunity to build a more complete story all the way through the year is very evident.

The question is how aggressive NBCUniversal will be. Will it expand into other sports and live events? Will it look to drive engagement outside of the US market? These are unknowns and will largely be dependent on the delivery of the Tokyo Olympics, though it has a very good opportunity.

IBC 2019: European Broadcasting Union joins FANG regulatory choir

The European Broadcasting Union (EBU) is the latest organization to start singing the praises of greater regulation, transparency and accessibility for the internet giants.

It is starting to become a tune to which we are all accustomed to, and it should come as little surprise the victims of aggressive disruption are calling for greater control, but the EBU has joined the regulatory choir at IBC 2019. Speaking during the conference, Noel Curran, Director General of the EBU, fired the shots across the Atlantic at Silicon Valley.

“Why is there no regulation in terms of data?” Curran stated. “Right now, we have an unregulated social media sector, being dominated by four or five big companies that have unprecedented amount of control.”

Again, this is a familiar story. Momentum has continued to gather behind the technology giants of Silicon Valley, compounding an already incredibly influential position. The broadcasters have been left behind, the telcos are attempting to drive relevance and the politicians are no-longer the most influential people in a country.

To add some context to the situation, one of the reasons ‘traditional’ broadcasters are in such a precarious position right now is a lack of evolution. This is an industry which progressed very little prior to the introduction of the streaming giants. Content might have changed, as has the technology to deliver said content, but the business models and engagement of consumers was stagnant.

The door was open for disruption, and if an industry doesn’t disrupt itself, troublemakers from the outside will do it.

Aside from the technology, the talent and the budgets, the FANG companies can harness the power of insight. As Curran points out above, these companies have a treasure trove of information the ‘traditional’ broadcasters can only dream of accessing. It not only allows the disruptors to create innovative business models through hyper-targeted advertising but enables them to make smarter decisions. FANG companies know their customers intrinsically, and it is fuelling growth.

This is another gripe from the ‘traditional’ broadcasting industry; the likes of Netflix and Amazon are not enthusiastic about sharing the wealth of insight. All3Media CEO Jane Turton confirmed what many of us already knew this week; the FANGs haven’t ever voluntarily or knowingly shared this valuable insight, and this is not changing.

This is the competitive edge Silicon Valley has. Sharing this data might encourage more of the ‘traditional’ broadcasting industry to sympathise with the FANGs, however why would they want to erode their advantage? It isn’t a level-playing field right now, though this is only because the FANGs are more forward-thinking and resourceful when it comes to the digital economy.

Perhaps this is something the ‘traditional’ broadcasting lobby will be pushing for in the future. Access to the data and regulation which forces FANG to play nice. The technology giants will of course resist, and we have already seen how powerful its own lobby can be, but the number of opponents is starting to add-up.

Disney+ to launch in November as streaming segment starts to look crowded

Disney has announced it will launch its video streaming service in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the Netherlands alongside the US in November, but how much appetite is there in the market?

This is the big question which the streaming world is facing; how many streaming services can be introduced before saturation point is reached in the profitable segment?

Alongside the likes of Netflix, Prime Video, Hulu, Now TV, YouTube, Fubo, Sling TV and several other niche services such as Nickelodeon and Fox News, Disney+, HBO Max and Apple TV will be fighting for the consumers attention. With so much fragmentation, you have to wonder whether the first-golden age for the streaming segment is coming to a close.

Today, Disney+ has given concrete plans for its launch, while Apple has been the subject of rumours. At Disney, the streaming service will debut in the US at the beginning of November, in Canada and the Netherlands on 12th November and in Australia and New Zealand on the 19th November.

Looking at the launch, Disney does seem to be ticking the right boxes in terms of content, it already owns an impressive library and has got some promising commitments to original titles, but you have to wonder about everything else.

Let start with experience. The likes of Hulu, Netflix and Prime Video have been honing their platforms for some time, and this could be one of the defining feature when it comes to winning the scrap for long-term subscribers. One of the attractive elements of OTT streaming services are the month-by-month commitment; customers can up and leave very quickly should they find issue with the service and getting them back will be tough.

Disney does not have any experience when it comes to creating or managing these platforms, whereas rivals have got years behind them. This could be a very important factor, especially when it comes to mobile.

Another challenge Disney will face, and we are surprised it hasn’t done more to address it on launch, is the brand awareness of the service. Fighting for eyeballs is a very expensive and tricky game to play, and while Disney has one of the most prominent brands on the planet, it has zero credibility when it comes to the delivery of digital content. Some might also question the breadth and depth of content which the library will contain.

This is why we are surprised Disney isn’t launching the service through local partnerships. Netflix and Amazon have already shown how powerful partnerships can be, embedding services in existing content aggregator platforms is an excellent way to win eyeballs and tempt subscriptions. This would have been an obvious route to take, leaning on the credibility and billing experience of a local partner, a telco for example.

That said, it is not too late. The service will be expanded to every major market by the end of the year, Disney claims, and there certainly are some multi-national telcos who could help generate exposure and credibility in some major markets. Vodafone or Deutsche Telekom could offer excellent exposure across Europe, as would Telefonica, as well as the LATAM markets. These partnerships could offer a direct, trusted and validated link to local consumers.

Another element to consider for the telco partnerships is the delivery of content over mobile. This is a different dynamic than the traditional means of viewing content, and few can offer the same expertise as the telcos. Mobile could be a significant tool for the armoury moving forward, and it will be interesting to see how the experience is received by consumers.

However, this does not address the wider issue which is lurking on the horizon; customer fragmentation.

When there were only two or three major services available, consumer wallets might have been able to tolerate numerous subscriptions. However, it is quickly getting to a point where choices will have to be made, as these services are not priced that cheaply anymore.

£6.99 or £10.99 isn’t realistically that much, however the quality of the services might decline. In years gone, these services were aggregators, but with the content owners clawing back titles off rival platforms, the libraries will get smaller. With Disney for example, all the Marvel content will be taken back, and with HBO’s service, titles like Friends will be removing from wider distribution.

What is worth noting is that original content could replace some of these titles, however, the pursuit of the next Breaking Bad or Game of Thrones is a perilous pursuit; not everything will be a winner, or appeal to a wide enough audience. There is a risk the quality of content could degrade as the streaming segment becomes more fragmented.

This is of course a negative view on the quality of content, the increased competition might welcome in a new era of quality programming. However, there are a lot of duds which are launched onto the unsuspecting world.

It is also worth noting that there is plenty of room for growth across the world. Markets like the US, UK or Germany might not present much greenfield growth for new subscribers, but there are still a few more hundred million in developed and developing markets to capture profits from.

Since Netflix changed the entertainment world with its streaming offering, hoovering up revenues, many have tried to replicate the success. You have to wonder how many services the segment can tolerate and remain the bountiful bonanza which many investors have been promised.

Third-parties are next battleground in video streaming war

Securing a partnership with the likes of Netflix and Amazon might be the golden-ticket for the telcos, but no-one should forget they have as much negotiating power as the OTTs.

For the telcos, convergence is an oasis of profit in the barren desert of the connectivity industry. As traditional means of generating cash are either destroyed (SMS and voice tariffs) or increasingly squeezed (CAPEX investments for 5G), many telcos are searching for differentiation to charge more and prove they can add value beyond the utilitised connectivity column. Content is a very popular route for many to take.

Aside from attempting to create content platforms, more telcos are seeking third-party relationships to move into the aggregator business model. This is a very sensible approach to business, the telcos can add a lot of value to the OTTs and securing a partnership with one of the more prominent streaming players is a key cog to their own ambitions. However, despite the desperation of the telcos, they should consider themselves on equal terms to the OTTs.

“Every telco is fighting to become an aggregator, but there is also a battle between the streaming OTTs to gain visibility,” said Paolo Pescatore of PP Foresight.

As Pescatore notes, outside of the two major players in the streaming world (Amazon Prime and Netflix), achieving visibility and scale can be very difficult. This is and will continue to be an incredibly congested field, therefore the relationship between telcos and OTTs could add an edge for any challenger.

Looking at the growth opportunities for the OTTs, there is plenty of cheddar left on the table, though in the developed markets, there are only crumbs left. Take the US for example, here Netflix subscriber growth has slowed, suggesting the glass ceiling for direct customer acquisition has been reached, or will be in the near future. The question is how these final customers can be engaged? Third-party relationships are key here.

At IBC last year, Maria Ferreras, VP of EMEA Business Development at Netflix highlighted that partnerships with telcos were an important cog as the streaming giant continues to evolve. At the time, the discussion was primarily from a billing relationship, though there are plenty of other opportunities.

Partners with their own content platform offer Netflix and Amazon something incredibly important; real-estate. Whoever can secure the most prominent position on the content platform will gain additional visibility and engagement with customers. It is evidence the OTTs are buying into the convergence strategies employed by the telcos, but also the value of the telco relationship with the customer.

Looking around the world, these partnerships are becoming much more common. Netflix has been embedded in the Sky platform in the UK, while Amazon Prime has been integrated into the Virgin Media platform. Mexico’s Totalplay has become the first operator in LATAM to add Amazon Prime to its TV service, while Vodafone Spain has secured partnerships with Netflix, HBO Spain and Amazon Prime.

There are of course numerous ways in which these partnerships can develop. Some are simply billing relationships, allowing the streaming service to be added onto the monthly bill, while some can have the OTT experience embedded into the content platform offered by the partner. What is clear, however, is this is an arms race from the OTTs.

The more partnerships which are in place, the more opportunity there is to engage potential customers and increase subscriptions. These partnerships are not only about securing visibility or accessing billing systems, but also leaning on another brands credibility to engage customers who wouldn’t have been previously accessible.

Interestingly enough, there aren’t many telcos or content providers who have relationships with more than one of the streaming giants. This might be a coincidence, or there might well be a desire from the OTTs to secure exclusivity through the platform of choice, even if it is not made official or public.

The challenge which many will face is going toe-to-toe with Amazon and Netflix. If these partners are securing the best relationships with the telcos, they will gain the most eyeballs on their services. Disney is company which will certainly want to lean on relationships with third-parties, but it will have to move sharpish to ensure it is not shut out.

Although Disney is one of the most prominent brands on the planet, it is almost unknown in the content world. This will present a challenge in two ways. Firstly, cutting through the background noise to educate the user on its offering, and secondly, the billing relationship.

For both of these challenges, third-party relationships with telcos and content platform owners can help. A direct line of communication is already in place, visibility can be offered through apps, billing relationships already exist, and third-parties are looking for partners to help build bundling options.

If Disney is going to be successful in its pursuit of streaming fortunes, it will need more than engaging content. It already has the content, and the ambitions for original content creation do look promising. The challenges will be in terms of securing visibility and credibility in the eyes of the consumer.

Telcos should realise sooner rather than later that they are an equal partner to the OTTs in this context, as they are just as desperate to secure favourable partnerships as the telcos. This is the next battleground in the streaming race; partners mean prizes.

The UK is turning to VoD – Ofcom

Half of UK homes now subscribe to TV Streaming services, reveals a new Ofcom report, as the country increasingly opts for video-on-demand.

The precise proportion is 47%, which is lower than some might expect given the apparent ubiquity of Netflix, Amazon Prime, etc, but still a significant jump from 39% just a year earlier. Furthermore, since many people have more than one service, the total number of subscriptions increased by 25%. If this keeps up it won’t be long before nearly all of us spend our evenings consuming copious amounts of VoD.

This is the headline finding from Ofcom’s latest Media Nations Report, which takes a deep look at the country’s media consumption habits. Any parent won’t be at all surprised to hear that younger people far prefer on-demand video over traditional broadcast and, as a result, consumption of the latter is in rapid decline. Thanks to the oldies broadcast telly is still the most popular form of video consumption, but not for long.

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“The way we watch TV is changing faster than ever before,” said Yih-Choung Teh, Strategy and Research Group Director at Ofcom. “In the space of seven years, streaming services have grown from nothing to reach nearly half of British homes. But traditional broadcasters still have a vital role to play, producing the kind of brilliant UK programmes that overseas tech giants struggle to match. We want to sustain that content for future generations, so we’re leading a nationwide debate on the future of public service broadcasting.”

The UK state seems to be in a mild panic about the decline in viewership of what it considers to be public service broadcasting, which means any old rubbish that’s publicly-funded. It’s highly debatable how much of the content produced by the BBC provides any kind of public service other than distracting us for a few minutes, but Ofcom seems to still think it’s really important.

This last table is especially illustrative of the current state of play, with younger adults all about YouTube and Netflix. If Ofcom had surveyed teenagers we suspect that bias would have been even more pronounced and as these trends continue the TV license fee is going to become increasingly hard to justify.

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Disney complicates video streaming market with $13 per month bundle

Content giant Disney has unveiled what it presumably hopes will be a Netflix-busting bundle of Disney+ ESPN+ and Hulu in the US.

Disney+, the core streaming service for Disney movies and other video content, had previously been announced at a cost of $7 per month. Disney also owns the majority of sports content network ESPN, and general TV content service Hulu, so it’s bundling them together with Disney+ for a grand total monthly cost of $13 – five bucks less then they cost individually and coincidently exactly the same as regular Netflix costs in the US.

“I’m pleased to announce that in the United States, consumers will be able to subscribe to a bundle of Disney+, ESPN+ and ad-supported Hulu for $12.99 a month,” said Disney CEO Bob Iger on the company’s recent earnings call. “The bundle will be available on our November 12 launch date.”

Commentary on this seems to be universally positive, with many observing that it’s very good value for money.

“The move throws down the gauntlet to Netflix and other rival services,” said Tech, Media and Telco Analyst Paolo Pescatore. “For sure it is competitively priced and seeks to reduce fragmentation. Initially, it seems that Disney is looking for scale but will need to increase revenue to recoup the significant investment. Consumers have some tough decisions ahead as they can’t sign up to all the streaming services.”

ITV and BBC to launch yet another streaming service

The streaming segment is already looking pretty crowded, but ITV and the BBC have decided to pair up to add another premium option into the mix with BritBox.

Priced at £5.99 a month, the service will launch in the final quarter of 2019, undercutting digital rivals who have been making life so difficult for the traditional players these last few years.

“We have a world beating TV industry with outstanding content,” said BBC Director General, Tony Hall. “The BBC and ITV are at the centre of that. Together, we have been responsible for delivering the majority of ‘must see’ moments on British TV over the last decade. That ‘must see’ content will now be on BritBox.”

“The agreement to launch BritBox is a milestone moment. Subscription video on demand is increasingly popular with consumers who love being able to watch what they want when they want to watch it,” said Carolyn McCall, CEO of ITV. “They are also happy to pay for this ease of access to quality content and so BritBox is tapping into this, and a new revenue stream for UK public service broadcasters.”

Although negotiations did seem to be on rocky ground occasionally, the BBC did appear to be showing a preference to its own iPlayer service, it might attract interest from various different segments of the UK population. The BBC has attracted plaudits for its programming over the last few years, especially around multi-series boxsets, where this service will focus.

BritBox will now become the home for all BBC and ITV programming once they fall off the streaming services which are already in place. Although ITV is free to put its programming on the ITV Hub for as long as it wants, it is believed Ofcom will force the BBC to make its programming available for a year on the iPlayer.

Bearing in mind both of these organizations already have streaming services for free, some might question what the point of this new service actually is, though there is an opportunity to combine forces and drive original programming exclusively for BritBox. Details are relatively thin on the ground, but the team will take the same approach as Netflix and Amazon, creating exclusive original content to attract subscribers.

Netflix share price slumps 11% as Q2 falls short of expectations

Netflix blames price increases and an under-performing content slate for poor performance in the second quarter of 2019.

Revenues and profits might be up, but these are two metrics which have never seemingly bothered Netflix shareholders that much. What seems to be bothering the twitchy investors is tepid subscriber growth and increased competition in the streaming segment; ultimately these will both lead to the revenue and profitability metrics, but the point is to cast an eye on the horizon not today.

And it appears some investors do not share the same optimism as the Netflix management team as share price slumps 11% in overnight trading.

“… as you can see over the past 3 years, sometimes we’re forecast high,” CEO Reed Hastings said during the earnings call. “Sometimes we forecast low. This is one where we forecasted high. There was no one thing.

“And if I think about three years ago, we were also light, and we never really were confident of the explanation. Then, we were $2 billion in quarterly revenue. Now, we’re going $5 billion. And so, it’s easy to over-interpret the quarter membership adds, which are a bit noisy. So, for the most part, we’re just executing forward and trying to do the best forecast we can.”

Subscription numbers are of course all important for what effectively is a single revenue stream business model, and the numbers aren’t the most flattering. 2.7 million net additions compared to the 5 million which were forecast at the beginning of the quarter, including a net loss of 130,000 in the US. When you consider the US currently accounts for roughly 48% of total revenues, this becomes an issue.

Hastings is playing his hand exactly as you would expect. In the early years, Netflix told investors not to worry about the money as subscriber gains are going through the roof; the money would come eventually. Now, Hastings and co. are telling investors not to worry about subscribers because the money is rolling in.

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What is worth noting is that one bad forecast, one dip in subscribers, does not engulf Netflix in flames. Its not ideal, but as long as it doesn’t become a trend there shouldn’t be much to worry about.

Understanding why is of course critical however should Netflix want to rebound to the 7 million subscription gains it is promising over the next three months.

Firstly, price increases have not landed well with the subscribers according to CFO Spencer Neumann. The biggest churn rates across the world were in the markets where Netflix had announced price increases, the US for example, though strong performance in Q1 and a poor content slate over Q2 were also factors which contributed to the numbers.

Neumann suggests the first quarter of 2019 was particularly strong, perhaps pulling forward subscriptions and emptying the sales funnel for the second quarter, while the team has suggested the content slate was not as attractive as previous periods. This should change in the future however as the business moves from a licensing model to one which is more governed by original content.

Over the next couple of years, certain companies are going to start pulling back content from the Netflix catalogue, Disney and WarnerMedia/AT&T are prime examples. Not only will this decrease the variety of content on the platform, removing some fan favourites as well, but it will also strengthen the opposition.

Netflix has not blamed competition for the poor performance this quarter, suggesting there has been not material change to the competitive landscape just yet, though some shareholders might be getting a bit worried. Netflix is facing some difficulties at the moment, while bigger disruptions are on the horizon with Disney and AT&T readying their own streaming services.

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What is also worth noting is content; Netflix is the market leader in the streaming market and is in the strongest position to deal with increased competition. There of course will be some difficult conversations to be had in the future, but this is still a business heading in the right direction.

Total revenue for the quarter was $4.9 billion, up 26% year-on-year, while the management team is forecasting $5.2 billion for the next three months, a 31% year-on-year jump. Globally, paid memberships increased to 151.5 million, while there were more than 7 million free trials across the second quarter.

On the pricing front, although this might have a slight negative impact on churn and subscription gains in the short-term, collecting additional revenue each month is only going to be a positive in the long-term. Netflix is still very affordable for the majority.

Looking forward, the team has suggested the first couple of weeks of the current quarter has demonstrated an acceleration in subscriptions, while churn is returning the levels experienced prior to the price increase. And while it might seem internet TV is taking over the world, there is still plenty of room for growth according to the team, both in terms of the linear/streaming dynamic and the opportunity on mobile.

Another factor to consider is the spend which is being allocated to original and localised content; few in the industry can compete with the Netflix numbers in this column. And as content becomes more fragmented through the various streaming platforms, the more original content Netflix produces, the more attractive is becomes as a service to consumers.

Netflix is still in a very strong position, but it is not going to have the same free-reigning dominance as it has experienced over the last few years. A diluted content library, price hikes and increased fragmentation will have a say in the fate of the business, but it is still in the strongest position of this increasingly competitive segment.

AT&T gets streaming with HBO Max

Gone are the days when the consumer could get all the content they wanted in one place as AT&T’s WarnerMedia joins the streaming landgrab.

With Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu, Disney, HBO and numerous other streaming services on the market before too long, the fragmentation of content is looking like it could be a serious problem for the consumer. Whether splitting the spoils has an overarching negative impact on the segments profits remains to be seen, but customers wallets can only be pushed so far; how many streaming services can each customer be expected to have?

That said, AT&T is in a strong position with this proposition. In HBO, it owns a lot of promising content already, playing into consumer nostalgia, and it does seem to be heading in the right direction in terms of original programming.

“HBO Max will bring together the diverse riches of WarnerMedia to create programming and user experiences not seen before in a streaming platform,” said Robert Greenblatt, Chairman of WarnerMedia Entertainment and Direct-To-Consumer.

“HBO’s world-class programming leads the way, the quality of which will be the guiding principle for our new array of Max Originals, our exciting acquisitions, and the very best of the Warner Bros. libraries, starting with the phenomenon that is ‘Friends’.”

With the service set to debut in Spring 2020, AT&T is promising 10,000 hours of programming from the outset. Full series of ‘Fresh Prince of Bel Air’, ‘Friends’ and ‘Pretty Little Liars’ will feature in the content library, as well as new dramas such as ‘Batwoman’ and ‘Katy Keene’.

Looking at future Max Original series, the list is quite extensive. ‘Dune: The Sisterhood’ is an adaptation of Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson’s book based in the world created by Frank Herbert’s book Dune. ‘Lovecraft Country’ is a horror series based on a novel by Matt Ruff. ‘The Plot Against America’ will be a reimagined history based on Phillip Roth’s novel.

The ingredients are all in place to ensure AT&T makes a sustained stab at cracking the streaming market which has been dominated by the OTTs to date. There are a couple of questions which remain however.

Firstly, pricing. Can executives price the service competitively while also sustaining investments in content? Secondly, experience. Will the platform meet the high-expectations set by consumers thanks to the high-bar set by Netflix? And finally, culture. Will AT&T allow WarnerMedia to operate as a media business or will it impose the traditional mentality of telcos onto the business?

AT&T has bet big on the content world and it can ill-afford to fluff its lines on its debut. Having signed an $85 billion deal to acquire Time Warner and spent what seems like decades battling various government departments to authorise the transaction, the telco will need to see some ROI sooner rather than later.

The question is whether the momentum in the streaming world can be sustained. Platforms like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime were attractive in the early days because there was consolidation of content onto a single library. With more streaming services becoming available, the fragmentation of content might well become a problem before too long. Consumers will have to make choices on what service to subscribe to, limiting the profits of the individual providers.

The days of subscribing to everything might be a thing of the past before too long; wallets can only be pushed so far.

Diversification into profitable segments is certainly a sensible strategy in the days of meagre connectivity profits, but $85 billion is a lot to spend on a hunch.