Consumers won’t be happy, but an Indian price hike is necessary

Reliance Jio is the latest Indian telco to announce an increase in mobile prices, but considering the precarious position the market is in, it is probably much needed.

Vodafone Idea and Bharti Airtel were the first to suggest a price hike was on the horizon, perhaps due to the $13 billion spectrum bill the government offered them, but Reliance Jio is not far behind. According to the Economic Times of India, the increased tariffs are necessary to fuel fresh network and technology investments.

This move might mean the constant flow of subscribers for Reliance Jio slows, and it may have a dampening impact on the aggressive expansion of the digital economy in the country. But these are short-term compromises which might have to be made for the long-term health of the industry.

Country ARPU ($)* Av. price per GB ($)** Av. monthly income ($)*** Percentage of income
United Kingdom 21 6.66 3,445 0.193%
India 1.6 0.26 168 0.155%
USA 32 12.37 5,238 0.236%
South Africa 6 7.19 479 1.501%
South Korea 27 15.12 2,550 0.592%
France 20 2.99 3,423 0.087%
China 7 9.89 789 1.253%
Finland 20.2 1.16 3,979 0.029%

* Figures from Ovum World Cellular Information Service

** Figures from Cable.co.uk

*** Figures from Worlddata.info

While the Indian consumer might not be thrilled by the increase in monthly costs for connectivity, it perhaps should not come as a surprise. As a percentage of monthly income, India does have some of the lowest mobile connectivity costs, price per GB, worldwide and as has been seen from the quarterly financials, the telcos cannot tolerate these tariffs for too much longer.

Over the last twelve months, quarterly revenues at Vodafone Idea have been slowly declining. It is difficult to come year-on-year financials, the combined entity isn’t old enough, but in the last quarterly earnings call the quarter-on-quarter results saw revenue decrease by roughly 4%. At Bharti Airtel, the story is very similar. Since Reliance Jio’s entry full-year revenues are only heading one direction, down, though it does seem to be picking up slightly for the second-half of 2019.

In 2016, India needed a disruption and it got it with the introduction of Reliance Jio. This is a market which was falling woefully behind international trends when it came to connectivity accessibility, but perhaps the current situation is an overcorrection. The price per GB is very low, offering more accessibility to the digital economy, but this is clearly not sustainable.

Vodafone and Idea merged to make a single service provider, Telenor exited the market because of pricing pressures, Reliance Communications fought but ultimately lost, state-owned BSNL needs to be propped-up with government funds and Airtel is flagging. With insolvency rumours swirling around the merged Vodafone Idea business, it does appear Reliance Jio is the only healthy telco.

This does not paint the picture of a healthy telecommunications industry. Some suggest the market might be heading towards a monopoly, and it is difficult to argue when you look at the trends. Competition is a key word in almost every region, and it is dwindling in India.

Consumers might severely dislike the idea of increased mobile tariffs, but the current prices are certainly not sustainable; it looks to be a necessary evil. In comparison to other markets, there is perhaps room to increase prices in India.

In certain markets, the price per GB is far too high, it creates a digital divide, but India is the opposite end of the scale. The current pricing landscape might make the digital economy more accessible, but if it destroys competition in the long-run the final outcome will be a net-loss.

Vodafone and Bharti set to raise prices help pay government bill

Beleaguered Indian operators Vodafone Idea and Bharti Airtel have indicated they will need to start charging their customers more.

Neither of them explicitly blamed the massive government bill they’ve been asked to pay for the unspecified price hike, but the fact that it has happened so soon after they got the bill and that they made the announcements almost simultaneously means it’s very unlikely to be a coincidence. The increase will kick in at the start of next month.

“To ensure that its customers continue to enjoy world class digital experiences, Vodafone Idea will suitably increase the prices of its tariffs effective December 1, 2019,” said Vodafone Idea in a statement to Business Standard. “The acute financial stress in the telecom sector has been acknowledged by all stakeholders and a high level Committee of Secretaries headed by the Cabinet Secretary is looking into providing appropriate relief.”

“The telecom sector is highly capital intensive with fast changing technology cycles that require continuing investments,” said Bharti Airtel in a statement to the Economic Times. “It is, therefore, extremely important that the industry remains viable to support the vision of Digital India. Accordingly, Airtel will appropriately increase price offerings in the month beginning December.”

Their nemesis Reliance Jio announced a month ago that it was going to start charging for stuff it had previously given away for free, which led to some muttering. Now that its competitors are also raising their prices it’s clear that the government cash grab will ultimately cost regular people. Vodafone and Bharti will be hoping their customers don’t punish them too much for this move, but it will surely lead to them losing some more business to Jio.

CTA suggests Trump’s tariffs doing more harm than good

The Consumer Technology Association (CTA) has labelled the logic behind President Donald’s Trump’s trade strategy with China as a “one-step-forward, two-steps-back” approach.

The current resident of the White House certainly does polarise opinion, though the CTA is claiming the strategies in play during trade talks with China are having a negative impact on the consumer. With an election looming large on the horizon, if the idea of Trump hitting the US wallet consumer gains traction, it could prove to be a very damaging piece of rhetoric.

“The tariff delay on $250 billion worth of Chinese goods is welcome news for American businesses and consumers – but a one-step-forward, two-steps-back approach means US businesses will continue to struggle under the burden of tariffs and uncertainty in supply chains,” said Gary Shapiro, CEO of the CTA.

“American businesses thrive when they can dedicate their time and resources to innovating and competing globally, not checking Twitter for trade policy updates and combing through HTS codes to find which products are facing higher taxes. We’re encouraged by the progress from today’s round of trade talks and hope that President Trump will stop using tariffs as a weapon during this Phase 1 agreement.”

According to estimates from the CTA, US consumer tech companies paid an additional $1.8 billion on tariffs in August alone, with $124 million on products critical to 5G deployment. Considering these figures are only focusing on a single month, and 5G network deployment is not scaled to mass market just yet, the bill is likely to be eye-wateringly higher in the future.

Although Trump’s approach to Chinese trade negotiations has been criticised by industry, the consumer has not necessarily been involved in the argument. And why should it? Trade talks are something which happen in the background without the ‘man on the street’ being too bothered in the past, though there is a different element to consider here; if wallets start to get impacted, the very citizens Trump is supposed to be protecting from the evil communists might start to get a bit irked.

Citizens are consumers after all, and in a consumer-driven society, cheaper is usually better. There will of course be homage paid towards quality, though this can only be drawn out so far. Consumers have gotten used to paying less and getting products right now. Being asked to pay more for the dubious claim of national security might not sit well with some.

According to the same data presented by the CTA, the tariffs have the consumer technology an additional $14 billion since they were first introduced in July 2018. $1.3 billion can be attributed to 5G-related products. These costs derived from a more expensive supply chain will be eventually passed onto the consumer.

What is worth noting is that there is probably worse to come if the President decides this approach to negotiations is proving successful. And we suspect from the tone of statements and tweets, the inner-circle of US politics are very much committed.

This is perhaps one of the worst elements of the current saga for US business, the idea of uncertainty. If these companies knew exactly what was going to happen, changes could be made to the supply chain. It might cost a little more, and while this is not ideal, operational efficiencies could be driven elsewhere. Knowing that there is something terrible on the horizon is much better than it popping-out from behind a tree.

The risk of the unknown, and a political leader who seemingly reads the Beano for strategic inspiration is likely to make many businesses very nervous.

Tim Cook smooth talks Trump away from tariffs over dinner

Over dinner this weekend, Apple CEO Tim Cook has seemingly added to the softening position President Trump is taking on trade tariffs imposed on goods and services from China.

The last week has seen several new rumours emerge from the mill, suggesting the White House is backing away from its aggressive stance against China. It of course remains to be seen whether Congress will allow Trump to de-escalate the situation, though it does appear Trump wants to switch-up the rhetoric.

“I had a very good meeting with Tim Cook, I have a lot of respect for Tim Cook, and Tim was talking to me about tariffs,” Trump said to US reporters over the weekend.

“And one of the things is that he made a good case, is that Samsung is the number one competitor and Samsung is not paying tariffs because they are based in South Korea, and it’s tough for Apple to pay tariffs if they are competing with a very good company that is not.”

Finding consistency in the Trump rhetoric is similar to discussion the pros and cons of VAR with the Mad Hatter. Aside from these comments, some US companies will supposedly have until Christmas to work with Chinese suppliers, Huawei Technologies will allegedly be given another three months to buy from US suppliers and Trump has promised violence against protesters in Hong Kong will negatively affect trade talks.

Looking at the extension, sources are now suggesting Huawei will be granted another temporary general licence. The additional three-month window will offer another reprieve to US suppliers, though it is highly-likely Congress will start to throw a bit of a temper tantrum. Political opponents of Trump have already shown distaste for the mood swings of the President, and we suspect road-blocks will be introduced.

The only consistency from the trade conflict between the worlds’ two largest economies is inconsistency.

We are yet to read Trump’s “The Art of the Deal” but perhaps there is a chapter on shifting goal posts. The strategy from the White House seems to be escalate and de-escalate tensions regularly, perhaps to confuse political opponents in Beijing so a cohesive counter-strategy cannot be formed.

Here, Cook’s comments are exactly what you would expect from a CEO who has little concern with geo-politics. Cook and the Apple management team will not want to take sides, simply sell iPhones to iLifers, irrelevant to where they live, at a price which generates the most profit. The tariffs threaten this mission.

Apple might be able to recover its second-place in the smartphone market share rankings before too long, such is the damage which is being dealt to the Huawei consumer business, but how will Samsung benefit?

If Huawei’s international customers stop buying Huawei devices, sales will be redirected elsewhere. However, if Apple is not able to keep the price of its devices down, it will struggle to compete. Apple will firstly have to convince Android users to switch to iOS, but also not to be tempted by Samsung, or more price-sensitive brands such as OPPO, LG, OnePlus or Xiaomi.

What is not entirely clear is how broad the tariffs conversation actually was. We suspect Cook simply argued Apple should be exempt from the tariffs, why should he want to help anyone else, though there will be plenty of companies keeping an eye on the developing situation. Trump could find himself in a very difficult situation if preference is shown to a few hand selected companies.

If there is a game plan scribbled on the back of a Burger King menu somewhere in the Oval Office, it will either be the musings of a mad-man or the work of a strategic genius. The number of moving parts and dummy passes is enough to make anyone’s head spin.

Trump backs off tech tariffs as threat to consumer wallet gets real

There is seemingly only one thing which is more important to President Donald Trump than winning the trade-war, and that’s getting re-elected to the White House for a second term.

The latest message from the White House is a simple one; technology companies will largely avoid the threatened tariffs because it might punish the consumer financially. The fourth quarter is fast approaching, a period which is usually very profitable for the consumer technology giants due to Christmas purchases, the political fallout could be quite damaging.

Announced by the Office of the US Trade Representative, certain products will be exempt from trade tariffs to be introduced on September 1. These products include smartphones, laptops, gaming consoles, some toys, computer monitors, and various items of footwear and clothing. The tariffs will instead be introduced on December 15, once the store shelves have been stocked and many consumers would have completed their Christmas shopping.

“We’re doing this for Christmas season,” Trump said to US reporters. “Just in case some of the tariffs would have an impact on US customers which so far they have virtually none. The only impact is that we’ve collected over $60 billion from China.

“Just in chance it would have an impact on people, we’re delaying the tariffs, so they won’t be relevant to the Christmas season.”

This might be a short-term win for the consumer, but let’s not forget, the tariffs will be introduced eventually. Consumer goods will increase in price, as there are few firms who are patriotic. Manufacturing facilities would not be on the other side of the world if they were, they would create jobs and facilities in the US. There is a financial benefit to manufacturing products elsewhere or purchasing components from China.

Trump has stated there have been no impact to the consumer to date, but there will be. Anyone who believes the consumer will be protected from the additional cost acquired through these tariffs is either naïve or stupid.

There have of course been numerous technology companies lobbying for exemption from the tariffs however this reprieve is much more expansive. Share prices have increased by 4.5% for Apple following the quip from Trump, however toy manufacturer Mattel saw a 4.6% gain, while shoe designer Steve Madden saw a 3.4% boost.

For the moment, this is a good thing for the consumer, however it will likely only be temporary. Trump has escalated and de-escalated the trade-war with China where it suits his ambitions, and this smells like another tactical withdrawal. The aggression has been anything but consistent, with some ego stroking thrown in and the promise of a progressive phone call never too far away. This is usually followed up by a significant announcement or claim from one of the hawkish politicians.

The see-sawing might well be a ploy by the White House to destabilise trade-talks, perhaps an attempt to manoeuvre into a more advantageous position. This might well be the case here, though there is perhaps an eye being cast to the next Presidential Election.

There is now 446 days left until the next Presidential Election and the campaigning will start to ramp up in the new year. As the Democrats already have plenty of ammunition to hurl towards the Oval Office, the last thing Trump needs is fresh wounds from an overly expensive Christmas shopping list to be lurking in the already financially straining January.

This looks to a momentary reprieve in the trade-conflict which has dominated headlines in the technology world for 2019. As it stands, the tariffs will be introduced, but at least US consumers can get their hands on the latest Apple flagship device first.

Vodafone ‘rips up the rulebook’ with new 5G pricing model

With EE claiming the ‘first’ accolade many telcos seem to think is critically important, Vodafone needed to do something different to gain attention; this pricing move might well be an important one.

The idea is simple. Instead of tiering pricing plans on monthly data allocations, unlimited data packages can be purchased with tiered limits of speeds. Customers can select the package which is best suited to the way in which they use their devices.

This approach is certainly an interesting one and certainly has the potential to disrupt the status quo. Vodafone is not the telco giant it once was in the UK. It sits third in the market share ranking for mobile subscriptions and is a comfortable distance away from the top two. However, a new approach to pricing might get the team back to its former glory days.

Brand O2 EE Vodafone Three
Market share 36% 33% 20% 11%

Statistics from Ovum’s World Cellular Information Service (WCIS)

With ‘Unlimited’ data plans, the tariffs are designed with 5G in mind. Vodafone UK CEO Nick Jeffrey pointed out that 5G is much more than a smartphone. A tsunami of devices will be connected to the network soon enough, and consumers will be digesting data in new ways; the last thing 5G consumers want to worry about is reaching a monthly data allocation.

“These tariffs are perfect for the over-the-top generation,” said Consumer Director Max Taylor.

Instead of tiering tariffs on consumption allocations each month, customers will be able to subscribe to download speed limits, with unlimited data pools. As you can see below, there are three tiers to take into consideration.

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Taylor suggested each of these tiers have been designed with experience in mind. The slowest, with a maximum speed of 2 Mbps, is for those who do little more than message, browse the internet or distract themselves on social media. The next tier is for those with an average data appetite; 10 Mbps is more than enough to run SD video on the go, while the final tier is for the heavy data consumers, gamers for instance.

Although this is a very interesting approach for Vodafone, what is worth noting is this is not the first time this pricing structure has been used. Elisa in Finland has been tiering its data plans on speed limits for years, but this should not take away from what is a very interesting switch from Vodafone.

“Vodafone’s move into unlimited data and its decision to price 5G the same as 4G indicate the emergence of a challenger mentality,” said Kester Mann of CCS Insight. “This is in sharp contrast to its traditional premium-focussed approach. It could spell bad news for Three, which has built a strategy based on challenging industry norms.”

One party which will not be happy with the news is Three. Over the coming months, the ‘challenger’ telco will be launching its own 5G proposition and we suspect it might be brewing up its own disruption. As Heavy Reading’s Gabriel Brown noted to us at the launch event, such an announcement from Vodafone might ‘steal some of the wind from Three’s sails’.

What is worth noting is the ‘Unlimited’ tariffs will only be available for SIM-only customers. You can see the pricing tiers for subsidized handset contracts at the bottom of the article, there is some opportunity for competitors to undercut Vodafone.

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Finally, Vodafone is taking a page out of the BT playbook by tackling the connected everywhere challenge. In launching its ‘5G Gigacube’ FWA product, the team are also supplying a convergence tariff to allow for seamless connectivity everywhere and anywhere. And for £50 a month, with an Amazon Alexa smart speaker included in the bundle, it is an attractive proposition.

Like Three, Vodafone is looking to challenge the traditional home broadband market. The FWA offering doesn’t need a landline or an engineer to hook-up the equipment, it is a simple and cheap alternative to fixed broadband. With home and mobile broadband, both 4G and 5G, bundled in with an Amazon Alexa for £50 a month, this might turn a few heads.

If Vodafone is to make moves in the UK connectivity market, it needs to do something different. This is what the last couple of years have all been about, turning the oil tanker. It now has a new converged network, Redstream, more legacy IT systems are being switched-off each year, nine more in 2019, and the financials have returned to growth for the first time in five years. When you add in the new pricing model, convergence strategy and innovation hubs to bolster the enterprise business, things are looking positive for Vodafone.

After giving up its market-leading position years ago, Vodafone is starting to look like a business which can challenge at the top of the UK connectivity market once again.

Vodafone and EE 5G tariffs point towards a new form of digital divide

If the technology industry wants 5G to change the world, placing prohibitive pricing on data tariffs is a strange way to go about it.

The count-down clock to 5G is heading towards the small numbers, and now Vodafone customers will be able to pre-order 5G-ready devices and decide on what tariffs they are able to afford. Unfortunately for some, the prices might prove to be too much of a premium for wallets to stomach.

Devices and various different tariffs are now available for pre-order through the Vodafone website.

Tariff Samsung Galaxy S10 5G Xiaomi Mi MIX 3 5G
5 GB Red Extra £149 upfront, £58 monthly £99 upfront, £50 monthly
15 GB Red Extra £99 upfront, £62 monthly £99 upfront, £54 monthly
30 GB Red Extra £49 upfront, £66 monthly £49 upfront, £58 monthly
60 GB Red Extra £49 upfront, £70 monthly £49 upfront, £62 monthly
25 GB Red Entertainment £99 upfront, £69 monthly £49 upfront, £61 monthly
50 GB Red Entertainment £49 upfront, £73 monthly £49 upfront, £65 monthly
100 GB Red Entertainment £49 upfront, £77 monthly £49 upfront, £69 monthly

All contracts set at 24 months

What is missing from the above table is a nod to Huawei. Vodafone has hit the pause button on devices from the under-fire Chinese brand. As with EE, Huawei’s 5G phone will not be sold through the Vodafone website for pre-order. It would appear this will be the case until the difficulties with the operating system and ecosystem are ironed out.

Despite these complications, the prices are what the prices are.

“Given its high-profile battle with EE to lead in 5G, I expected Vodafone’s initial tariffs to be punchier,” said Kester Mann of CCS Insight. “The entry £50 offer includes just 5 GB of data; on a 5G network, customers could quickly burn through that.”

Mann is absolutely correct; 5 GB will not last long given the promise of the 5G ecosystem and the usecases envisioned. However, upgrading to bulkier tariffs is perhaps cost prohibitive, potentially creating a new digital divide.

As it stands, the price is prohibitive for some. £52 as a starting point is a high barrier to entry. It seems only the privileged will be comfortable with spending so much on a connectivity contract, creating a society of ‘haves’ and ‘have nots’ and another potential digital divide.

Although there have been promises 5G tariffs will be priced on similar levels to 4G, the premium should come as little surprise. People will be prepared to pay for bragging rights.

It should also be noted EE has priced the connectivity options at the same levels. Vodafone have slightly undercut EE for 5G tariffs, but not by much. This is perhaps a situation which we should have expected. Until all four MNOs are on the market with a 5G proposition, threatening to steal valuable postpaid subscriptions, the price will remain lofty.

Tariff OnePlus 7 Pro 5G Samsung Galaxy S10 5G Oppo Reno 5G
30 GB, one swappable £64 a month, £50 upfront £74 a month, £10 upfront £59 a month, £50 upfront
30 GB, two swappables £69 a month, £50 upfront £79 a month, £10 upfront £69 a month, £50 upfront
60 GB, two swappables £74 a month, £30 upfront £84 a month, £10 upfront £69 a month, £30 upfront
60 GB, one swappable £69 a month, £30 upfront £79 a month, £10 upfront £69 a month, £30 upfront
120 GB, three swappables £79 a month, £10 upfront £89 a month, £10 upfront £74 a month, £10 upfront
100 GB, two swappables £74 a month, £10 upfront £84 a month, £10 upfront £69 a month, £10 upfront
10 GB, two swappables £59 a month, £170 upfront £69 a month, £130 upfront £54 a month, £170 upfront
10 GB, one swappable £59 a month, £70 upfront £69 a month, £30 upfront £54 a month, £70 upfront
10 GB, two swappables £64 a month, £70 upfront £74 a month, £30 upfront £59 a month, £70 upfront

All contract set at 24 months

As you can see, the prices are not consistent with the overall rhetoric of the industry. For many years, the industry has preached of democratizing connectivity, while 5G was supposed to be a technology which benefitted the masses.

At the moment, the risk of a digital divide is very apparent. The rich will get the benefits while the poor remain in the 4G-era. While the genuine 5G usecases are yet to emerge, this is not necessarily an issue. 5G offers little more than increased speeds right now, a premium which isn’t really needed with the applications and services which are currently on the market.

Over the next 6-12 months, Three and O2 will enter the fray with their own networks. This should cause the price of 5G connectivity to tumble. Hopefully at least, as the current state-of-play is a connectivity world which has been designed for the privileged.

EE 5G hits the ground running

Sneaking in-front of Vodafone to debut on May 30, EE’s 5G proposition will be launched across six cities in the UK with a range of different devices and interesting bundling options.

While the launch of the network was announced last week, BT Consumer CEO Marc Allera gave much needed colour to the deployment plans at a media event in London and to be fair to BT and EE, it does look pretty impressive.

From today, customers will be able to pre-order bundles from EE as well as choose from multiple devices. The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G will of course be one of the options, though customers will also be privy to exclusive deals with the Samsung Fold, Oppo Reno 5G and the LG V50 ThinkQ, as well as Huawei’s FWA device and the HTC 5G Smart Hub.

While all of the devices certainly promise a lot, the LG approach is perhaps the most interesting. The device itself is pretty much as you would expect, though a separate module is also included, allowing the device to be clipped in to add an extra screen (as you can see below). Head of LG Mobile UK Andrew Coughlin said the product has been designed with multi-taskers in mind, with each screen working independently of the other.

The device also has the potential to open up entirely new experiences when it comes to gaming.

LQ Images

What you will not see over the next few months is a Huawei device launched in partnership with EE. Allera suggested the pause button has been hit on this relationship, due to the difficulties the firm is facing with its Android licence. If EE cannot guarantee performance of the device throughout the customers mobile contract, it will not partner with Huawei.

But onto the launch itself, six cities will experience the 5G euphoria on Day One, with another 10 added to the mix over the remainder of 2019. Building on the already completed work, EE plans to upgrade 100 base stations to 5G a month, taking the total to 1500 by the end of 2019.

“Today is Day One of our 5G journey, we are going to be the first in the UK and one of the first in Europe to bring our customers 5G,” said Allera.

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Always connected is not a new concept from EE, though it would not be a surprise to see the message ramped up over the next couple of months. With 4G, broadband, wifi and, soon enough, 5G, EE has a lot of connectivity assets to shout about. When you combine these different segments with the largest geographical 4G coverage of all the UK MNOs, this is a selling point which would genuinely interest our internet-obsessed society.

That said, advertisements will need a bit of ‘sexing up’ if they are to catch the attention of the mass market.

On the speeds side, it does look like EE will be launching its 5G network with the ambition of reaching 200 Mbps. However, the message will be more focused on reliability and consistent experience as opposed to peak speeds.

“Peak speed might be the headline, but it is not the story,” said Allera.

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Creative tariffs and bundling are where EE might be able to attract the most attention. 5G customers will not only gain access to faster download speeds and more reliable connections but will get the option to choose from various different zero-rating options to make the most of the connectivity euphoria. These options can be swapped out as the customer desires.

Finally, EE will be also be the exclusive partner of Niantec for the highly-anticipated follow-up to Pokemon Go; Harry Potter, Wizards Unite. Although Pokemon Go was a bit of a sham when it came to delivering on a genuine augment reality experience, the Harry Potter game looks much more immersive and truer to the definitions of AR. Considering the popularity of Pokemon Go, Niantec could certainly be onto another winner should it be able to nail the AR experience with this new title.

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What is worth noting, is this is only the first phase of the EE 5G strategy. The aim will be to have 5G present in 50 cities across the UK by this time next year, though in the first phase it will only be in the busiest areas. Although the geographical rollout will be quite limited, 8% of base stations will be 5G, these assets will deliver 25% of the total traffic running across the EE network.

The second phase of the deployment, starting in 2022, will see the rollout of EE’s brand new 5G core, as well as the introduction of new spectrum. This will be when the UK will be able to experience a genuine 5G network, with the prospect of cloud gaming, AR and immersive content living up to the promise. The final phase, 2023, will see the introduction of mission critical applications focusing on the low-latency angle of 5G.

Interestingly enough, despite all the criticism faced by Huawei in the press, EE will be launching its 5G proposition with Huawei at the core of the network. This is unavoidable and will only be temporary, EE will gradually phase out Huawei from the core, but it is a fact which has seemingly been overlooked or cleverly managed out of the public domain by the BT PR team.

5G is about to become very real for the consumer and soon enough there will be a battle between the MNOs to fight for attention. EE and Vodafone might be scrapping for the 5G lead right now, but this approach from EE looks very promising.

Ofcom outlines plans for 2019/20

With the country on the verge of realising the promise of the digital economy, the pressure is still on Ofcom to make sure a fair and sustainable landscape is developing. Here, the team outlines its plans for the next twelve months.

“It’s a great way of being able to explain why our work matters and what some of the areas are we want to give a particular focus to,” said Ofcom CEO Sharon White. “And it’s also a way of being able to be held accountable for those areas.

“This year we’re talking about two big consumer themes. Fairness for customers, how do we make sure whether your getting broadband or mobile, you’re getting a great deal, a fair deal from your provider, and the other big these is better broadband, better mobile wherever you live.”

The plan itself actually focuses on four areas. Firstly, better connectivity. Secondly, fairness for customers Thirdly, supporting UK broadcasting. And finally, raising awareness of online harms.

Starting with better connectivity, over the next 12 months the Government’s planned universal broadband service will be getting more attention, while the team will continue to focus on opening up access to BT’s network of underground ducts and telegraph poles. Addressing the mobile not-spots, more airwaves will hit the auction lots and it would be a fair assumption more coverage obligations will be heading towards the telcos.

On the fairness side, work will continue to ensure operators are being more transparent when informing customers about the best available deals and tariffs. One area which has been prioritised is for those customers who pay for their handsets bundled with airtime, or those who pay more because of their contract status.

Looking at UK broadcasting, the message here seems to be value for money and ensuring public service broadcasting is still fit for purpose. A lot has changed over the last five years, look at the growth of OTT streaming services and downfall of linear TV, and there is a feeling something needs to change to ensure public funds are being spent in the best interest of those who pay the taxes in the first place.

Finally, in terms of the final part of the programme, this will be a tricky one. There is of course a need for consumers to be more aware of the dangers of the digital economy, but this is an area which has been largely ignored to date. No-one is particularly to blame here, as without the consequences it becomes very difficult to educate on dangers and be taken seriously. That said, there have been plenty of scandals and data breaches in recent memory to give Ofcom ammunition.

With the 5G dawn breaking and the increased drive for fibre finally hitting home in the UK, there is plenty to be excited about but much work which needs to be done. An excellent example of this is the Which report panning ISPs for failing to deliver on consumer expectations. Telcos are traditionally slow-moving beasts, though technology developments are increasingly speeding up, dominating more of our lives, change might have to be forced through.

Ofcom not only needs to ensure there is an effective landscape for the telcos to thrive, it needs to ensure these benefits are being passed across to the consumer and the economy. The next twelve months promise a very business time for Ofcom employees.