Three UK talks up its 5G investment plans

The UK’s fourth MNO, Three, has given a public update on its investment priorities and plans for 5G.

The headline figure is £2 billion, which is what Three says it is committed to spend on 5G stuff. Apparently Three customers are more data-hungry than average, so it’s even more important that it drops enough cash to ensure its infrastructure can keep up. The intended message seems to be that Three is for real in the 5G era and the other UK MNOs had better watch their backs.

“We have always led on mobile data and 5G is another game-changer,” said Three CEO Dave Dyson. “Also described as wireless fibre, 5G delivers a huge increase in capacity together with ultra-low latency.  It opens up new possibilities in home broadband and industrial applications, as well as being able to support the rapid growth in mobile data usage.

“This is a major investment into the UK’s digital infrastructure. UK consumers have an insatiable appetite for data and 5G unlocks significant capability to meet that demand. We have been planning our approach to 5G for many years and we are well positioned to lead on this next generation of technology.  These investments are the latest in a series of important building blocks to deliver the best end to end data experience for our customers.”

Dyson also had some stuff to say on the matter of Huawei potentially getting a hard time from UK public bodies which you can read more about here. So where is all this wedge going to end up? Details are thin on the ground right now and it looks like the headline figure includes some investment already made. Three did offer the following highlights of its 5G investments so far.

  • Acquired the UK’s leading 5G spectrum portfolio
  • Signed an agreement for the rollout of new cell site technology to prepare major urban areas for the rollout of 5G devices, as well as enhance the 4G experience
  • Built a super high-capacity dark fibre network, which connects 20 new, energy efficient and highly secure data centres
  • Deployed a world-first – a 5G-ready, fully integrated cloud native core network in the new data centres, which at launch will have an initial capacity of 1.2TB/s, a three-fold increase from today’s capacity, and can scale further, cost effectively and quickly.
  • Rolled out carrier aggregation technology on 2,500 sites in busiest areas, improving speeds for customers

Q&A with Lynda Burton, Director of Wholesale at Three

With less than ten days until the MVNOs Europe 2018, the MVNOs Series spoke with Lynda Burton. Director of Wholesale at Three, Lynda owns MVNO, white-label partnerships, bulk messaging, carrier services and international roaming functions. In this interview, Lynda shares her predictions for 5G, its benefits to customers and partners, and the most exciting use cases. 

What are your predictions for 5G and what benefits will it bring to operators’ customers and partners?

We see the launch of 5G as a significant impact upon the market and one from which Three intend to get maximum advantage. We have more 5G spectrum than any other operator and with our plans for a fully virtualised network well advanced, we will be able to leverage all the benefits of 5G. Thanks to the rollout of 5G, our spectrum and new technologies like Massive MIMO, our network will be able to support almost thirty times the data that it does today – that means we can bring on more customers fully exploiting our wholesale business opportunities. It is really exciting for our team.  It also opens up new connected customer verticals, connecting people to people, people to things, and things to things in both business and consumer segments.

Can you also tell us a bit more regarding 5G use cases? Why MVNOs should be excited about it?

In the short term 5G is going to allow customers to do more of what they are doing now but much faster. In the consumer space this could mean a far superior low latency gaming experience and removing the need for fixed broadband – so few millennial customers value their fixed line, it is the natural progression for them to become a fully mobile connected household.
Longer term we see a significant opportunity in connectivity for business applications, whether that is connected health, car or other industries that need high bandwidth, low latency services, or the IOT applications where there are many millions of devices utilising the network.

Finally, our fully virtualised 5G network will allow “network slicing” effectively allocating portions of the network to a particular organisation or vertical. This is cutting edge stuff and the use cases are not fully defined yet, but because of the investments we have made in 5G we have the capability and can work internally and externally on how we bring it to market.

How are networks getting ready for 5G and how that includes MVNOs? i.e. Will operators ensure MVNOs have access to their wholesale 5G networks?

Operators across Europe are working on their 5G plans. At Three UK we have been planning meticulously for 5G for a long time. Our network and IT transformation, moving us to a completely new and fully virtualised core network, increasing the number of data centres, adding new mobile backhaul with SSE and redeveloping our IT systems, is progressing very well. When completed the core network we are building in partnership with Nokia will be a world first. Without this you cannot fully leverage all the capabilities of 5G. We have already secured more 5G spectrum than any other operator and this opens up a significant opportunity for us.

With regards to our MVNO partners, they are already briefed on our 5G strategy and we are continuing to update them. Historically Three UK has always offered our MVNOs network parity with Three Retail and this means that in the future MVNOs will be able to access 5G. We had the same approach to 4G access.  This was quite different to the approach of other operators who sought to retain premium services for their own retail customers, giving MVNO customers a more basic service – some of the larger MVNOs only gained access in the past two years. We don’t believe that holding new technologies back from our partners is a model that works. If we help them to grow, we’ll grow and that’s the model we will bring to 5G.

How can operators help their MVNOs to face the changing ecosystem? i.e. Are operators willing to reduce their wholesale rates if RLAH has a profound impact on their MVNOs’ businesses? Will operators be more flexible and work with MVNOs to negotiate their roaming deals?

That’s a lot of questions! Certainly at Three UK we have always had a flexible approach to working with our MVNOs, whether that is technical or commercial models. We believe that our success is driven from our MVNO’s success, so we are always open to having a dialogue if an MVNO needs our support, and that is on anything not just RLAH. We like to work out challenges together, we really do see our MVNO relationships as partnerships.

With regards to whether we would negotiate roaming deals on an MVNO’s behalf, we already offer a managed service on roaming for our MVNO lite customers, leveraging our roaming relationships with over 190 networks globally.

How do operators tackle the increased data demand from their customers?

Three’s own retail customers use more than 3x the average data consumption each month and our customers have recently voted us the best network for data. Delivering high speed and high bandwidth is our heritage – our network was designed for data.  All the projections have data demand growing exponentially over the next 5-10 years and 5G will help us manage that capacity in a cost-effective way.

What are your views on delivering a fully digital MVNOs? What do you consider the pros and cons of this model?

There a couple of ways that an MVNO could be considered fully digital, it could be that the MVNO can only be accessed via digital channels. So, customers buy online, access their account online and are served through online channels such as webchat. I definitely believe that for the right customer segments this is a model that really works. We only need to look at many of the other digital services like Netflix and Spotify to see that consumers are comfortable in buying service in a 100% digital channel, and I think it’s an area where we will continue to see growth. Obviously, there will be some segments of customers who prefer a face-to-face service, or the ability to call a call centre for help. In the short terms these customers are unlikely to want to migrate to a fully digital experience. But this is at the core of the MVNO ecosystem. MVNOs target different customers segments and offer them an experience which is differentiated from the mass market and serves that customer segment’s needs.

The second way an MVNO could be considered fully digital is if all the calls are handled through digital channels, in app calling, sometimes referred to as AppVNOs. Three offer a product that supports this model, our OTT virtual numbers. This allows organisations to set up a mobile calling experience within an App, for example if you wanted to have a mobile number in a dating app. It’s relatively early days for the product but we are seeing some interesting use cases and as always we are keen to exploit new technologies and ideas for our wholesale customers.

What are the best strategies when approaching customers via new channels? How can MNOs and MVNOs develop and implement their digital strategies better?

Accessing new customers through new and different channels is critical to the success of an MVNO partnership. Our recent partnership with Superdrug is a great example of this. The relationship enables Superdrug to add new benefits to customers within their loyalty scheme giving them a fantastic mobile offer and double loyalty points on all their spend in Superdrug.  For Three, we get to bring new and extremely loyal customers to our network through an entirely new channel.

In the Superdrug example we are using both retail and digital channels, all the joining journeys can be undertaken online, including setting up your SIM after buying it in a Superdrug store. The online account web pages and web help allows customers to service their account and get help through flexible and lower cost digital channels. Much of the infrastructure that supports this has been developed by Three as part of our white label platform, while Superdrug bring their outstanding understanding of their customers and how best to target and sell to them through stores and digital loyalty media. It’s an exciting proposition and opens up more opportunities for brands who may not have considered their loyalty scheme as a channel for telecoms services.

What are your views on network virtualization and its impact on operators?

I have already mentioned that virtualisation is crucial to fully leveraging the benefits of 5G but there are other enormous benefits that it will bring. It will allow us to be far more agile, delivering change in the network faster and ultimately allowing us to develop new products and services far faster than the competition, reacting to the ever-changing demands of our retail and wholesale customers. In short it will give us and our partners a significant competitive edge.

Automation is a key part of our network virtualisation story that will enable many activities that are manual today to be automated in the future, as well as providing instant self-healing capabilities improving network availability and reliability.

Hear from Lynda Burton at the MVNOs Europe 2018, taking place in London, 6 – 7 November 2018. Lynda will deliver a presentation on ‘Preparing for 5G – setting your MVNO up for 5G success’. Book your tickets now.

Three confirms job losses but says they’re nothing new

Three has responded to claims in the press regarding reported job losses; yes there will be a headcount reduction, but this is not something it has been hiding.

In an interview with the Press Association, CEO Dave Dyson confirmed there would be job losses as a result of a new technology platform being implemented, however this is not new. This is a project which has been underway for months, Three has been managing the process and has announced these cuts before.

Speaking to Telecoms.com, Three confirmed the job losses, roughly 300 positions in the IT department, though this is part of a greater automation and digital transformation project. This should not indicate there is a new efficiency programme.

“The changes will be phased over the next four years and we’ll be helping staff to find roles with our technology partners, in other parts of the Three business or outside Three where necessary,” the company has stated.

While it is never a positive job to talk about job losses, such developments should be taken with context. This is not a new initiative from Three, neither is it a particularly unique case across the industry. Numerous operators are reducing headcount as new technologies are implemented, old technologies are retired, processes streamlined and automation trends become more influential. Three has been named as the culprit in this example, but almost every operator is going through the same process, some with much more significant cuts.

Thanks to automation trends and the big squeeze on profit margins, operators are being forced to reduce exposure. Sometimes this does mean implementing new technology to replace a company’s  largest overhead; the workforce. According to data compiled by our sister site Light Reading, over the last two years, there has been a 6% drop in total jobs for the top 20 telcos in Europe and the America’s. AT&T and Deutsche Telekom are the top slashers, though America Movil isn’t too far behind.

In this example, cuts are coming, though it is a process which Three has been quite up-front about over the last couple of months. For those Three employees reading this, this isn’t another unpleasant surprise.

Don’t listen to the moaners, phones are great – Three

Three has launched a new marketing campaign designed to counter all the moaning about how bad phones are for you.

In a new campaign, simply named ‘Phones are Good’, the telco imagines how historical moments would have been different if smartphones had been around. From Henry VIII on Tinder, to the Titanic with GPS, it’s a bit of fun which indirectly encourages people to use the internet more, playing directly into Three’s USP.

“At a time when we are being told to get off our phones, Three’s customers are actually using them three and a half times more than other providers,” said Shadi Halliwell, Chief Marketing Officer at Three. “That’s because, unlike others, we understand how real people use their phones.

“And although we shouldn’t be on our phones 24/7, if it weren’t for our mobiles how would you find love lounging on the sofa? Buy new shoes while sitting on the toilet? Or get a chicken cooked, seasoned, garnished and delivered to your door at the drop of a hat? As the Best Network for Data, it is our duty to challenge the cynics, and help everyone see that Phones Are Good.”

As you can see from the video below, it’s a creative way to get Three’s message across, and quite entertaining.

While Three is suggesting all these wonderful ideas on how mobile phones could have changed the course of history, there is of course the other side of the coin…

  • If the Mesopotamians had used MyBuilder.com for its reviews of local tradesmen, their grain storage units would have never leaked and beer would not be a thing
  • The Spanish Armada of 1588 could have been successful in its mission to conquer England if Sir Francis Drake was taking numerous selfies for the perfect Instagram post instead of gazing onto the horizon
  • Had a clumsy Chinese chef been following a YouTube recipe he might not have dropped a natural coagulant called nigari into a pot of soybean milk and created Tofu
  • Juliet might never have fallen for Romeo had she done a bit of Facebook stalking beforehand (admittedly this didn’t really happen)
  • If Percy Spencer had been using a calorie counting app, he would have never had that chocolate bar in his pocket and invented the microwave
  • Finally, without the power of Twitter the US might have a logical and caring human being in charge…

Of course, the revolutionary impact of mobile devices, not just the smartphone, is countered with negatives. Instead of talking to that lonely women on the bus, we stare at cats playing the piano and or toddlers biting siblings fingers. But, we more connected to family members on the other side of the planet. There’s always rough with the smooth.

Ultimately Three is attempting to push the advantages of the internet and encourage more people to consume more data. As the telco which sells itself to the more digital-enthusiastic users, using the internet more benefits it. It sells itself on data volume more than anything else.

The idea of the smartphone contradicts all the lessons of politeness and paying attention which we were taught as children. Perhaps the next thing we should be worried about is virtual reality. Parents have been telling children all around the world sitting too close to a TV screen is bad for your eyes, yet VR places a screen inches in front of your face.

What is it with telcos and the ‘creative’ approach to advertising honesty?

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) has once again had to step in to put a stop to telco advertising, this time Three’s efforts, posing a pretty simple question; why do the telcos find it so easy to put misleading adverts into the world?

The latest ruling was surrounding Three’s ‘Go Roam’ claim, which states users are able to ‘Feel at Home’ by using their full data allowance without any extra costs in 71 countries. An investigation from the ASA found postpaid users were limited to 13GB and postpaid to 12GB, before costs were applied. There is text hidden away somewhere on the Three website pointing towards a fair use clause, though the ASA does not believe this is sufficient and Three has been misleading customers.

Three’s response to the claims was relatively simple. Firstly, most of it customers only use 0.75GB per month in a ‘Go Roam’ destination, therefore 12GB was excessive. Secondly, that the claim had been used since 2014 and was strongly associated with their brand, which supposedly makes it alright. It does appear some customers were using it for business purposes, making several trips abroad per month, while the offer had originally been intended for holidays.

This is a perfectly respectable defence from Three, but without informing the customer of these conditions, it doesn’t have a leg to stand on. Unfortunately this is becoming a common trend. Service providers seem to think they can do what they like before pointing to some obscure reference on websites, incredibly small print or a statement made to an irrelevant number of people at a niche event. While Three might have been caught out in this instance, it is not alone.

BT had a complaint upheld regarding its claims on wifi speeds in April. Sky was caught misleading customers in March regarding a price promotion. Vodafone was caught out earlier this month and in September for misleading claims in adverts featuring Martin Freeman. There are other examples, plus the pending investigations with the ASA and also dozens of examples over the last few months of ‘informally resolved’ incidents. Vodafone has ‘informally resolved’ 12 of these complaints so far in 2018, TalkTalk seven and O2 five. Some of these will be down to honest mistakes, but the complaints seem to becoming more common.

Of course the other factor which needs to be taken into account is the ‘up to’ metric which plagued telcos advertisements for years, misleading customers over speeds which can be achieved. Any normal person would have told any of the telco’s marketing team this is not a fair or honest way to communicate with the consumer, but it become commonplace. It seems the telcos are harbouring different standards when it comes to honesty than the rest of us.

EE holds onto Opensignal MNO crown

EE has held onto its position as the best performing UK MNO according to the latest figures from Opensignal.

For 4G download performance, EE maintained its leadership position with average download speeds of 29 Mbps between June and August, while it also led in upload speed, latency and availability. This is not to say there weren’t improvements elsewhere, Vodafone grew its average 4G download to 21.9 Mbps, though Three’s dropped with the telco slipping down to third place in the performance rankings.

4G might not have been a fruitful playground for Three, but it did steal the top-spot for 3G speeds off EE. With average speeds of 7.8 Mbps it edged just ahead of EE at 7.2 Mbps, though this will come as little comfort as telcos increasingly look to re-farm 3G spectrum to bolster 4G performance.

Interestingly enough, O2 is still maintaining its position as the leading telco in terms of market share, despite a damning review of the telco from Opensignal. O2 sat in last place for all categories aside from latency (3G and 4G) and availability, where it was second behind EE. O2 might arguably have the weakest network in the UK, the power of promotions seems to counter this position. The Priority loyalty programme is perhaps proving its worth in gold here.

While many will preach the benefits of having the best network, these figures show it’s not always about being the fastest.

Opensignal Awards

Three and O2 put positive spin on sh*t connectivity

Three and O2 have signed a deal with SSE Enterprise which will enable the pair to access its fibre ring, part of which is located in the Thames Water waste water network, to improve connectivity backhaul capabilities.

With 5G on the horizon, and demands for improved 4G experience, partnerships like this will be key to not only improve backhaul but also enable further 4G and 5G deployment by connecting cell sites and masts. Robust aggregation of fronthaul and backhaul access is necessary in order to provide greater resiliency, increase capacity and reduce latency. In other words, fibre is king if you want to meet the demands of the data-craving consumers.

Just to put things in perspective, UK data usage is set to grow thirteen-fold between 2017 and 2025 according to data from Ofcom, with the first 5G offerings set to hit the market during 2019. To meet this demand, 5G is key, enhanced 4G experience is key and backhaul is key. Fibre rules the roost.

“Networks will fundamentally underpin the UK’s digital economy and will be essential to 5G services,” said Colin Sempill, MD of SSE Enterprise Telecoms. “With this high capacity core in the London sewers, Three UK and O2 are tapping into our unique, diverse connectivity and putting their networks in a strong position to trial 5G offerings, while enhancing existing services for their customers.”

“New and innovative models are essential to improving the customer experience of mobile networks by increasing the availability of dark fibre for mobile backhaul and driving competition in the market,” said Dave Dyson, CEO of Three. “Our partnership with SSE Enterprise Telecoms and O2 is one of the first examples of using existing infrastructure to improve connectivity in an urban area.”

“This kind of agreement is essential to allow for continued investment and improvement of services for our customers,” said Brendan O’Reilly, CTO at O2. “This partnership is a great example of SSE Enterprise Telecoms, Three UK and O2 coming together in a collaborative and innovative way to address the growing challenge and pressure of obtaining access to fibre for mobile backhaul in the UK.”

SSE has been running some interesting projects to improve the speed and reduce the cost in terms of laying fibre over the last couple of months. In this example, SSE is licensed to lay fibre optic cables throughout Thames Water’s waste water network which it claims can reduce network deployment costs by 60% and speed up deployment by up to ten times. As the sewers can be as deep as 10 metres, laying the fibre in this way can decrease accidental fibre breaks as the traditional means see the cables laid only 12 inches below the surface. The waste water network is also geographically very wide-spread, it is a creative solution to the challenge of laying fibre more efficiently, even if it is a bit of a smelly one.

The agreement with Three and O2 will see approximately 100 points of connectivity exit from this central London sewer network via two BT Exchanges. By partnering with SSE Enterprise Telecoms, Three and O2 can operate their own Central London Area (CLA) network, while also accessing spare fibre ducts for future initiatives in London.

The last couple of months have seen SSE ink numerous deals with the telcos, including a separate partnership with Three where it has begun facilitating fibre optic connections for the telcos 20 core data centres. Last October, SSE also won a competitive tender from advanced fibre broadband specialists Grain to deliver network connectivity to Countesswells, a new £800 million development in Aberdeen.

UK MNOs accused of using handset subsidies to rip off their customers

Research from Citizens Advice reckons four million people in the UK are still paying back their phone subsidies after the end of their contracts.

This will come as no surprise to anyone who has reached the end of a postpaid contract that came with a subsidised handset. It’s universally understood that such things are part service contract and part financing on the device, but MNOs are generally deficient in contacting their customers when the contract period is over.

They do get in touch, but usually with misleading offers such as ‘free’ new handsets, when in fact they’re merely calling for the customer to initiate a fresh postpaid contract, complete with a subsidised handset. An honest exchange would also offer a SIM-only deal that would offer far more data for far less money in the absence of a new device.

Citizens Advice specifically calls out EE, Vodafone and Three, implying O2 does a better job on this matter. It reckons these four million mugs are being overcharged, on average, by £22 per month, which seems about right. It also found that most of the time we’re paying more for the handset by getting it subsidised by the operator than if we just bought it on the open market, but there’s no surprise there.

“It is unacceptable that mobile providers are knowingly overcharging customers for phones they already own,” said Gillian Guy, Chief Exec of Citizens Advice. “We’ve heard a lot of talk from government and the regulator but now we need action. Other companies have already stopped doing this so we’re looking for these three major providers to follow suit. In the meantime, consumers should check their phone bills to see if they can save money with a SIM-only contract or upgrade to a new phone.”

Like most studies accusing utilities of ripping off their customers this ultimately comes down to telling them not to be lazy and check their contract every now and then. It’s not difficult to give yourself a reminder to renegotiate your contract when it expires so those who don’t should receive limited sympathy. On the other hand, from an industry that constantly wrings its hands about churn, this is hardly an example of customer service best practice.

Ericsson managed services contract with MBNL gets extended

MBNL, the network joint venture between UK MNOs EE and Three, has decided to keep Ericsson on as its managed services provider until 2020.

Managed services is a big part of Ericsson’s business, but has been its most problematic division of late thanks to a bunch of ill-advised historical contracts apparently entered into in a desperate drive for growth. Current CEO Börje Ekholm has prioritised profitability over growth and thus encouraged the abandonment of the worst of these, among which the MBNL deal clearly isn’t.

“This marks another significant milestone in our longstanding partnership with MBNL and our joint commitment to deliver superior network quality and performance to Three and EE consumers in the UK,” said Peter Laurin, Head of Managed Services at Ericsson. “We are delighted to continue our successful relationship and continue to evolve our managed services portfolio to deliver innovation and industry leading efficiencies through automation and analytics.”

“The agreement to extend the Design, Plan and Deploy services contract with Ericsson, for a further two years, reflects the strength of the collaborative relationship between Ericsson and MBNL,” said MBNL MD Pat Coxen. “This will continue the trend of collectively delivering great results and is a sign of true partnership. We look forward to continuing the great work with Ericsson in order to meet the demanding business objectives of MBNL and its shareholders.”

So far, so generic, but Ekholm and Laurin will be delighted by any positive news coming out of the managed services division. A major strategic decision has been to restrict its customers to those who already by Ericsson networking gear, which also seems to be a good way of restricting excessive deal-making zeal. You can hear more from Laurin about the strategy for his division in our Inside Ericsson piece.

Three looks to complimentary brands to focus on retention

Three has announced the launch of a new two-year partnership with EasyJet to build out its loyalty programme for customers.

As part of the agreement, Three customers will be able to check in hand luggage for free, while also taking advantage of priority boarding amongst other benefits including a free tote bag for carry-on essentials. This partnership is the latest to buffer the Three customer experience strategy which also includes tie-ups with Snapchat.

The partnership could said to be based on O2’s Priority engagement strategy, which has been incredibly successful over the years. It also demonstrates a different mentality to what we are used to when it comes to telcos; reward current customers with incentives, as opposed to simply focusing on bolstering subscriber numbers.

The loyalty app itself, Wuntu, now has 1.1 million active users, up from 350,000 over the last twelve months, and features 400 partners. Over the course of the first six months of 2018, there was a total of 1.5 million offer redemptions from customers, up from 400,000 in the same period of 2017. Partners include the likes of Hotel Chocolat, Dominos and Belle Italia, though EasyJet could arguably be described as one of the more significant wins.

“The EasyJet partnership gives us a big chance to influence our customer’s experience in the airport,” said Three CEO Dave Dyson. “It’s a company which has a very like-minded audience, and is a chance to bring extra value to customers.”

For the moment, the scope of the partnership is limited, but there are two years to play around with new ideas; Dyson said to expect a variety of new offers. Snapchat is another example of a partnership which could work out very well for the business. In both examples, Three has identified brands with similar audiences and identified a pain-point to address; queues in the airport and data consumption with Snapchat users. These are two examples of a company pragmatically identifying how it can add value to the experience, without making risky plays through diversification.

Like O2’s Priority initiative, Three is playing a low risk game. The value is being presented to the customer, though it is an option. Some telcos have gone down the content route to enhance the experience, but this could prove to be expensive (just ask Gavin Patterson). By offering other brands access to its subscriber base, and in return gaining exclusive offers for customers, it is a win-win situation.

The idea of brands audience sharing is not new, but it is extremely effective. By asking customers to download an app, its less intrusive than the traditional means of spamming, and opens up a huge number of opportunities. More importantly, Three is looking inwards, caring for the customers it has, not simply reserving attractive offers for new customers; this is an excellent way to isolate a current customer and destroy a relationship.

There are of course numerous studies online which argue the point of customer retention versus acquisition, with some claiming acquiring new customers can be five times more expensive than retention. Caring for a customer, creating a relationship which makes them feel valued, is also an excellent way to increase revenues in other areas of the business. Just look at the brand and loyal customer which Apple has created over the years; many of these iLifers would choose to purchase Apple products over others irrelevant whether there are better or cheaper options.

Loyalty programmes are not uncommon, but many seem to be slap-dash and only present because it seems to be the right thing to do. That said, we get the impression Three has seen the light and might start treating current customers with the attention they deserve.