ZTE moves to prove its own security credentials

Taking a page from the Huawei playbook, ZTE is opening its own European cybersecurity lab to demonstrate its own security credentials and appeal to customers.

Although Huawei is taking a battering on the US side of the Atlantic, European nations have stubbornly stood by the side of reason and reasonable behaviour, asking for evidence before signing an execution order. One of the reasons for this will be the apparent transparency to security through its cybersecurity centres in the UK and Belgium, and it seems ZTE is following suit.

“The security lab is an open and cooperative platform for the industry,” said Zhong Hong, ZTE Chief Security Officer.

“ZTE plans to gradually achieve the cybersecurity goals through three steps: first, meeting the requirements of cybersecurity laws, regulations and industry standards as well as certification schemes; second, conducting an open dialogue to enhance transparency and establishing cooperation with customers as well as regulatory agencies; and third, sustaining the open cooperation mechanism to contribute to cybersecurity standardization.”

Opening in Rome, the cybersecurity lab will enable telcos to contribute ideas to improve the security credentials of ZTE products, while customers will also be able to conduct audits of all products and services in the labs. This approach is seemingly working for Huawei, and ZTE is recognising the opportunity to get in on the action as 5G ramps up across the continent.

For ZTE this is a perfectly sensible move to mitigate against future risks. As Huawei is largely a proxy for Chinese aggression, it would be reasonable to assume any action taken against Huawei would be replicated against ZTE. Anything which can be done to get into the good graces of potential European customers should be seen as a priority.

Although it is for selfish reasons, the cybersecurity centre also adds more credibility to the standardisation approach which seems to be forming across the European continent. The more vendors who agree to the higher barriers to entry, the closer the continent comes to standardising security credentials. This approach to risk mitigation, an acceptance that 100% secure is an impossible objective, manages threats while also preserving competition.

Until there is concrete proof of collusion with the Chinese government for nefarious aims, this is the most sensible approach, taking the argument out of the political arena.

Ofcom outlines plans for 2019/20

With the country on the verge of realising the promise of the digital economy, the pressure is still on Ofcom to make sure a fair and sustainable landscape is developing. Here, the team outlines its plans for the next twelve months.

“It’s a great way of being able to explain why our work matters and what some of the areas are we want to give a particular focus to,” said Ofcom CEO Sharon White. “And it’s also a way of being able to be held accountable for those areas.

“This year we’re talking about two big consumer themes. Fairness for customers, how do we make sure whether your getting broadband or mobile, you’re getting a great deal, a fair deal from your provider, and the other big these is better broadband, better mobile wherever you live.”

The plan itself actually focuses on four areas. Firstly, better connectivity. Secondly, fairness for customers Thirdly, supporting UK broadcasting. And finally, raising awareness of online harms.

Starting with better connectivity, over the next 12 months the Government’s planned universal broadband service will be getting more attention, while the team will continue to focus on opening up access to BT’s network of underground ducts and telegraph poles. Addressing the mobile not-spots, more airwaves will hit the auction lots and it would be a fair assumption more coverage obligations will be heading towards the telcos.

On the fairness side, work will continue to ensure operators are being more transparent when informing customers about the best available deals and tariffs. One area which has been prioritised is for those customers who pay for their handsets bundled with airtime, or those who pay more because of their contract status.

Looking at UK broadcasting, the message here seems to be value for money and ensuring public service broadcasting is still fit for purpose. A lot has changed over the last five years, look at the growth of OTT streaming services and downfall of linear TV, and there is a feeling something needs to change to ensure public funds are being spent in the best interest of those who pay the taxes in the first place.

Finally, in terms of the final part of the programme, this will be a tricky one. There is of course a need for consumers to be more aware of the dangers of the digital economy, but this is an area which has been largely ignored to date. No-one is particularly to blame here, as without the consequences it becomes very difficult to educate on dangers and be taken seriously. That said, there have been plenty of scandals and data breaches in recent memory to give Ofcom ammunition.

With the 5G dawn breaking and the increased drive for fibre finally hitting home in the UK, there is plenty to be excited about but much work which needs to be done. An excellent example of this is the Which report panning ISPs for failing to deliver on consumer expectations. Telcos are traditionally slow-moving beasts, though technology developments are increasingly speeding up, dominating more of our lives, change might have to be forced through.

Ofcom not only needs to ensure there is an effective landscape for the telcos to thrive, it needs to ensure these benefits are being passed across to the consumer and the economy. The next twelve months promise a very business time for Ofcom employees.