Fingers pointed towards 3G work for Three network outage

While the full-extent of the network outage has not been unveiled just yet, some are suggesting maintenance on the firms 3G network is the root cause.

Three has confirmed it was a change to the network which was being made overnight on Wednesday [October 16] which caused the outage, but it is being elusive with the specifics. Either it doesn’t know, which we doubt, or it doesn’t want to say.

There does appear to be customers who are struggling to connect to voice, SMS and data services, though the majority of the issues seem to have been settled. Networks appear to be up-and-running, and now the work begins to understand the cause of the outage. Perhaps more importantly, the team will also want to figure out how to ensure this incident does not occur again.

“Following the technical difficulties with our services yesterday, the majority of our customers can now make calls, send texts and use data,” Three said in a statement.

“Our engineers have worked overnight and are continuing to iron out a few remaining issues from a technical perspective. While voice and text have returned to normal, unfortunately a small number of customers may continue to experience intermittent issues with data.

“To help with the process we advise our customers to turn their phones off and on or turn airplane mode on and off, which will in most cases resolve the issue by resetting your phone’s connection to the network.”

Although the ‘turn it off and turn it on again’ request will infuriate a few, it is usually the best way to get things fixed. Three is suggesting the problems are in the past and it will be hoping its reputation has not taken too much of a hit.

Unfortunately for the team, there was a bit of a misguided attempt at humour during the saga. In one tweet, Three suggests O2 had unplugged its 3G network when plugging in its own 5G infrastructure, though a few commentators noted that it might have been a bit funnier if there weren’t customers continuing through the data-less struggle.

Looking at the root cause of the issue, there is still some ambiguity. Some have suggested it might have been teething problems for the new cloud core, being supplied by Nokia, though Three has denied this. Other reports have emerged suggesting maintenance and repairs on 3G infrastructure could be the reason.

The 3G work is an interesting angle, as while Three is attempting to switch-off 3G in pursuit of re-farming valuable spectrum for 4G and 5G, this is still a work in progress.

Interestingly enough, while the process of switching-off 3G networks is one which is gaining popularity, spectrum is a valuable resource after all, it might have a negative impact on the 2G networks which are still running.

Although it might seem unusual to discuss 2G in today’s world, a report from Tech UK suggests the need for 2G services is likely to continue into the 2030s. The services are still being made use of by the elderly, rural users and M2M applications, this will not change in the immediate future. If telcos are switching off 3G, the demand of these areas cannot be offset meaning 2G networks will have to be maintained for the foreseeable future.

“We sometimes focus on technology without fully understanding the impact on services people rely on,” said Tony Lavender, chair of the Spectrum Policy Forum Steering Board.

“Among other things, 2G enables smart metering and the mobile phones used by many vulnerable people in society. We need to think through the alternatives for these services before switching them off.”

While hiccups are rare in the connectivity world, they are certainly not unheard of. Last year, inadequacies from Ericsson resulted in an expired software license crashing O2’s network in the UK and Softbank’s in Japan. At the time of writing, Verizon is also entering the domain of damage control after users faced the connectivity baron land in the North-east and the Mid-west.

What is unclear is what the financial impact of the outage will be. As has been shown with the O2 network outage last year, consumers do not immediately flood towards the exit when services crash for an extended period of time. Three’s network does not crash regularly, therefore customers will likely tolerate this incident, but it might end up costing the firm a few million in compensation.

Samsung Galaxy S10 has a flaw that allows the fingerprint reader to be hacked

Following the discovery by a UK user that any fingerprint could unlock their phone, Samsung has announced it will issue a software patch.

The flaw was first made public earlier this week when Lisa Neilson from Castleford told the Sun newspaper about her discovery that she could unlock her Samsung Galaxy S10 with any finger, including her husband’s. It seems that the hack became possible when she put a screen protector on as the fingerprint reader in the S10 is embedded in the screen.

It looks like the reader was reading some kind of pattern on the screen protector rather than the finger pressing on it. Samsung rather unhelpfully responded that people should only buy Samsung-branded stuff, conveniently overlooking the fact that Samsung UK doesn’t even seem to sell screen protectors anyway.

There is also no advice offered on the problem anywhere on the Samsung UK site that we could see, but multiple media are reporting the following statement from Samsung: “We are investigating this issue and will be deploying a software patch soon.”

If it takes more than a software patch then Samsung would have to do yet another expensive product recall. For the ultrasonic fingerprint sensor to be hacked by something as simple as a screen protector is pretty embarrassing for Samsung. Furthermore, if it doesn’t provide a definitive answer to this issue very quickly then public trust in the security of its latest phones will start to erode rapidly.

Three UK suffers major network outage

Many Three UK users have reported they have no signal, with Three apparently struggling to get to the bottom of it.

Just as with competitor Vodafone, Three UK made the morning news for all the wrong reasons following widespread reports of no signal from its users. The PR challenge was made greater by the company’s apparent silence on the matter, with the Three UK support Twitter account silent until well into the morning and the web link apparently buckling under the strain of anxious punters.

The only statement we have received from Three so far merely reiterates that holding position. “Three is currently experiencing technical difficulties with our services across voice, text and data which means that some customers will be experiencing an intermittent service,” it said. “Our engineers are working on the issue now to fix the problem as soon as possible. We are sorry for the inconvenience caused to our customers.”

At time of writing there had been no update, although were able to access the support site, which presented the following message: “Our services are coming back online. If you’re still having problems, please turn your device off and on again to get re-connected.” The information vacuum was filled, as ever, by online speculation, including the trending hashtag #threedown.

We have seen some speculation that this could be down to teething problems with Three’s shiny new cloud core, but who knows? Just as with Vodafone Three will presumably sort out the problem before long, but the lack of explanation for the outage is troubling and if it is anything to do with the new core this will be a good case study of self-healing networks and all the other clever stuff that is supposed to come with the move to the cloud.

 

UPDATE 14:45 17 Oct 19: Three UK contacted us to categorically deny these problems have anything to do with the new cloud core. They have yet to comment on what the cause was, however.

O2 UK launches 5G network with no tariff premium

As the last UK operator to switch on its 5G network, O2 seems to be trying to make up for lost time by charging its customers no premium to switch from 4G.

The ‘new’ tariffs are the same as the old ones – i.e. you get the same amount of 5G data as you would 4G data, including an unlimited tier coming it at 40 quid a month. Initially only the following cities will have access to O2 5G and only in certain parts: Belfast, Cardiff, Edinburgh, London, Slough and Leeds. That will grow to 20 towns by the end of the year and 50 by the summer of next year.

“Today is a significant moment for our customers and our business as we switch on the O2 5G network,” said Mark Evans, CEO of Telefónica UK. “We’re launching with a range of tariffs that make it easy and fair for customers to access 5G, with flexible plans that cost no more than 4G. We’re also switching on 5G in important parts of towns and cities first, places where it will benefit customers and businesses most.

“I believe 5G is going to revolutionise the way people and businesses use mobile connectivity, unlocking huge possibilities for our economy and society. No one in the country has all the answers today, but I’m excited about getting it into the hands of our customers and working with leading partners to help shape the future of 5G for the next generation.”

Here are the tariffs, with the second one including some kind of virtual reality music service:

O2 UK 5G launch tariffs

Custom plans along with O2 Priority are important features that resonate with its customers,” said analyst Paolo Pescatore. “These will be paramount in the future in maintaining its customer centric leadership in the U.K. Expect content to feature more prominently in the future as it seeks to broaden O2 Priority for customers.”

The decision to charge no premium for 5G seems sensible as there is little incentive for them to pay it while the network rollout is still in its infancy. Instead 5G will become table stakes over the next year or so and the usual differentiation challenges will apply. Whether or not VR music will be a significant one remains to be seen.

Hyperoptic switches private equity owners

UK independent fibre provider Hyperoptic has had the majority of its ownership switched from lot of investment companies to another.

The new lot in control of the company is HKK, an investment company that seems to get involved in every industry in every part of the world. It acquired its stake in Hyperoptic from fellow investment companies Newlight and Mubadala. The terms of the deal weren’t revealed so we don’t know exactly how much of Hyperoptic owns or how much it cost, but this does seem to be the first time is has had a single majority owner for a while.

“We are incredibly grateful to Newlight and Mubadala for their unwavering support and significant contributions to the success of Hyperoptic,” said Hyperoptic CEO Dana Tobak, who will remain in place. “Currently, only 8% of the UK has access to full fibre and less than half of that to symmetrical gigabit services.

“We are confident that with the support of KKR and their significant expertise enabling high-growth businesses, our ambitious infrastructure plans to build our hyperfast network out to two million homes by 2021 and five million by 2024 will be realised.”

“Hyperoptic has a market-leading position and superior consumer product,” said two people from KKR in unison, apparently doing some kind of duet. “The business is strongly positioned to meet the growing demand for full-fibre services in the UK through further investment and national roll-out, supporting housing development and renovation. Our investment in Hyperoptic builds on KKR’s strong track record in telecommunications infrastructure in Europe, investing in and deploying next-generation digital connectivity.”

Meanwhile fellow UK fibre indie CityFibre has started an industry consultation on the role of such companies in the overall switch from copper to fibre. The move has apparently been prompted by the progress of CityFibre’s rollout in Stirling, which is set to switch to fibre-inly next year. There needs to be some kind of consensus about how best to support legacy services when the switch happens, the establishment of which seems to be the main point of this consultation.

“Only by collaborating as an industry, with the full support of government and Ofcom, will we be able to switch-over the UK from legacy copper networks to a future-proof full fibre platform,” said Greg Mesch, CityFibre CEO. “Our consultation will ensure that we play our part in this switch-over and that the eventual retirement of the copper networks is managed in a way that promotes sustained infrastructure investment from a range of organisations.

“With rollouts underway to reach over 20% of the UK market, our city-wide full fibre networks like that in Stirling will soon be of sufficient coverage to play their part, enabling a copper to fibre switch-over for the benefit of Communication Providers and their customers. Through our consultation, we look forward to engaging with the whole industry, including Openreach and BT Retail, to help develop a national plan to efficiently and smoothly upgrade Britain.”

With such a healthy independent infrastructure sector in the UK it seems clear some kind of best practice consensus is called for and it’s good to see someone try to get the ball rolling on that. Mesch will be speaking live at the Telecoms.com LIVE event in London on 7 November and this topic seems likely to come up. If you want to attend just click here to register.

US security concerns rubbished by industry and academic feedback

If you thought the UK’s Supply Chain Review was coming to an end, think again as policy makers have been given more food for thought as part of the 5G infrastructure and national security inquiry.

Entitled ‘Ensuring access to ‘safe’ technology’, Parliament’s Joint Committee on the National Security Strategy has opened itself up to public comment. Although it comes as little surprise, the feedback is relatively consistent; let the industry work with Huawei and take a risk-based approach to managing infrastructure and networks.

For those looking across the Atlantic, there might be some hurt feelings. Business and academics from across the UK have largely panned concerns, albeit in very polite wording, suggesting that while there are security standards and regulations to ponder, the US rhetoric is largely not supported by evidence and undermined by its own actions.

Submitted to the inquiry mid-way through last week, the team at Oxford Information Labs makes a very valid point regarding Huawei’s entry onto the Entity List:

“The ban was immediately suspended for 90 days, and that suspension was continued for a further 90 days in August 2019, casting doubt on whether Huawei really did represent an immediate ‘national emergency’ as originally claimed.”

Many might have contemplated this opinion, but few have vocalised it. If Huawei is such a threat to US citizens and business, why has the US Government so easily allowed it to continue to do business within its borders? If the White House propaganda is to be believed, Huawei should be erased from the Land of the Free, though the US Government has continued to validate its presence through the two exemption periods.

There is of course the damage to US businesses to take into account but suspending the enforcement of the ban does undermine the insistence that Huawei is the tip of the Chinese sword.

Another point to consider, which is constantly overlooked, is the depth of evidence to support the wild claims of the White House.

“The US Congress has a long history of making accusations against Huawei, though it has never produced any technical evidence to show that it has undermined the security of its network equipment or that it has impaired the performance of or shutdown networks using its equipment,” said Ewan Sutherland, a telecommunications policy expert from the University of the Witwatersrand.

From a personal perspective, your correspondent feels this is an element of the saga which should be taken very seriously. Due to market consolidation and the intensive R&D demands of 5G, there are already few suppliers for the telcos to consider. If one or two of the major players are to be removed from the supply chain, this is a significant decision to make. Evidence should be at the heart of these actions.

This is an element of the debate which everyone should take into account. Huawei has no material presence in US networks, aside from working with a small number of regionalised players. The US does not have to take an evidence-based approach to banning Huawei, as there is little consequence. Other nations, who have existing relationships with Huawei, must take a much more contemplative approach as there are much more serious implications.

The call for Huawei to be managed as opposed to banned is one which has echoed out of the offices for some time. Vodafone has consistently called for a risk-based approach to procurement, while Three in its evidence to the inquiry has demanded the delay to deployment be minimised. This would appear to be the rational approach, though the UK Government does seem hard-pressed to support it.

This is where the telecommunications industry has backed itself into a corner. In the pursuit of a more cost-efficient supply chain, consolidation has been rife. Alcatel, Lucent, Motorola and Nortel were all victims of the consolidation trends, streamlining the number of suppliers who can offer services to the telcos at scale. Telcos now have to look at Chinese vendors to ensure there is competition.

In an ideal world, the UK or US Government might be able to point to a domestic supplier and suggest more products and services are sourced there. This would allow the Government to have more of a handle on development requirements, and despite the suggestion of a new player emerging, this is unlikely to have any material impact on 5G.

“Perhaps, the United States will push or support the creation of a new manufacturer of RAN, though it would need to be for 6G or 7G, rather than 5G,” said Sutherland.

The likes of Huawei, ZTE, Ericsson and Nokia have been investing in 5G R&D for close to a decade and have already begun 6G investigations. What chance would a new, standalone player have in penetrating this market within the next 10-15 years?

Looking through all the submissions, there seems to be a consensus. There are only three network vendors who can realistically support rapid 5G network deployment at scale, and Huawei happens to be one of them.

Regulators do need to have a much more considered approach to acquisition and mergers in the future, if not for any other reason as to avoid the bureaucratic congestion which we are seeing through this entire Supply Chain Review process.

Another interesting takeaway from the evidence which has been presented, is the desire to remain closely aligned with Europe following Brexit. This should not be considered new either, though perhaps this could build a bridge to repair the damage done by posturing politicians during the Brexit negotiations. Let’s not forget, Europe is the UK’s largest trading partner, and this will not change any time soon; relationships will have to be re-forged following the divorce.

Last week, the European Commission collated all responses from member states into a white paper which said very little which was not already known. 5G presents more of a security threat than generations prior, while state-sponsored attacks are becoming more of a risk. While this might have been seen as busywork, it was a necessary step in the bureaucratic maze to getting something done.

Over the coming months, member states will submit more evidence and recommendations to create what could become a pan-European approach to mitigating risk and rolling out 5G networks. What the submissions are suggesting to the UK Government is that any future proposals on the Isles align as closely as possible to what our European cousins are suggesting. Not only does this provide international consistency, it is a sign of good faith for future trade and political relationships.

Although this is not the end to the protracted evaluation of Huawei and the role of Chinese vendors in the UK network infrastructure segment, it does paint a very strong case for inclusion.

Europe has proven to be a key battle ground in the increasingly fraught conflict between the US and China, and few companies are more exposed to the risk as Huawei. This is a vendor which captures billions in profit in its domestic market, as well as across Asia, though Europe contains a significant number of very prominent customers. However, the trends do seem to be heading the right direction.

Germany has recently said it would not legislate Huawei out of the country, Italy signed a Belt and Road Initiative deal with China in March 2019, Belgium has conducted its own review without consequence to the vendor, while France and the Czech Republic have given warnings but not definitive action. While it is still anyone’s best guess, the UK looks like it is heading towards a risk-based position, potentially enforcing a multi-vendor approach to procurement.

Of course, while logic and behaviour suggest this is the most likely outcome, there is a lot which can go wrong. The UK will have to balance up the impact on existing and potential relationships, especially its standing in the valuable Five Eyes intelligence community.

At some point in the future, the Government is going to have to make a decision. The prolonged review of the supply chain does not sit beside political ambitions for a rapid rollout of 5G or the accelerated timeline for a full-fibre nation. The longer this review takes, the less likely it is the UK will be a major player in the digital economy.

BT Mobile joins the 5G fray

BT has become the latest mobile player to enter the race for 5G subscriptions, though it does beg the question how economically attractive it is to own two rival services.

Launching in 20 cities and towns around the country, BT Plus and BT Business customers will be the first to be offered upgrades to the service. Convergence is a key pillar of the BT turnaround strategy, and the introduction of 5G to the BT brand does build in more relevance moving forward.

“Our 5G service provides customers with a faster and more reliable connection in high demand, crowded areas across the UK at peak times,” said BT Consumer CEO Marc Allera.

“When combined with the best fibre, the UK’s fastest 4G network and biggest wi-fi network, BT is helping consumers and businesses stay connected wherever they are and whatever they need to do.”

Despite the fact BT is in the most powerful position in the UK when it comes to connectivity assets, it hasn’t really been able to cash-in on the convergence craze just yet. The issue which has not been addressed to date, and now we suspect it won’t be in the near future, is rival brands, fighting for the same consumer, to contribute profits to the same bank account.

Customer acquisition in a mature and saturated market is incredibly expensive. The most successful strategies are generally those geared towards price, though this does create the dreaded ‘race to the bottom’. Perhaps one of the reasons convergence has not hit the high notes at BT is the multi-brand strategy which the team is persisting with.

EE has an excellent mobile brand, but it found wanting in broadband. BT leads the market in broadband but lacks clout in mobile. If either of these brands want to create value through convergence, they will have to lure customers onto a secondary-service which does not have the reputation of rivals. This is an expensive means of customer acquisition, both in terms of advertising and lower ARPUs.

These brands are not only fighting to lure the same customers away from the same rivals, they are also attempting to steal subscriptions from each other. It doesn’t seem like the most logical plan.

At some point, the brands will have to merge into one. Convergence doesn’t make the most sense when you trying to sell two different brands in the same bundle. We suspect the BT brand will win out, especially when you see the expensive brand advertising campaign which has been launched with the England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland football associations.

That said, it is important for the BT brand to enter the 5G fight if it does want to remain relevant in the mobile world moving forward.

Looking at the deal, BT consumer customers can choose from 6 GB, 30 GB, or 60 GB 5G mobile plans, and can also gain a £10 monthly discount if the plan is purchased alongside a broadband package. This might gain some traction, though there is still plenty of opportunity for pricing strategies to shift over the coming months.

Although many of those with 5G ambitions have unveiled their pricing strategies, there is still plenty of volatility left to realise. Pricing seems to expensive right now, though the telcos will be stubborn while the early adopters are purchasing. These are consumer who are less likely to be deterred by price. As soon as the mass market starts to get interested, this is where we can envision the pricing war genuinely kicking off.

Openreach explains why FTTP is such a great idea

A new report commissioned by fixed line infrastructure provider Openreach has concluded the UK would be £59 billion better off with full FTTP.

The report is called ‘Full fibre broadband: A platform for growth’ and was compiled by the Centre for Economics and Business Research, which likes to think it’s good at this sort of thing. The headline conclusion is that if we achieve ubiquitous fibre to the premises by 2025, UK productivity would increase by almost £59 billion, thanks to smarter ways of working and better public services.

It’s fairly common practice for analyst firms to use clever Excel models to extrapolate current trends and make forecasts and this is no exception. It seems the CEBR had a look at the effect FTTP has had in places where it’s already available and scaled that up to the whole country. It also tried to factor in other disruptive technological events such as mass ICT and even railways to get a sense of the transformative effect of everyone having faster broadband than they currently do.

As ever with commissioned research, Openreach wasn’t about to shell out for a report that concluded the whole reason for its existence is unimportant, but that doesn’t mean the conclusions should be ignored either. World class broadband does have the potential to transform society, especially when it comes to things like working from home and revitalising neglected parts of the country.

“Full fibre is a vehicle to turbocharge our economy post-Brexit, with the power to renew towns and communities across the UK,” said Openreach CEO Clive Selley. “We’re proud to be leading the way with over 1.8 million homes and businesses already having access to our full fibre network. We’re currently building full fibre to around 22,000 premises a week– which is one every 28 seconds. But we want to go even faster and further – to 15 million premises and beyond if we can get the right conditions to invest.

“Through our Fibre First programme, Openreach is now building to 103 locations across the UK and we’re on track to build to four million premises by March 2021. With the right policies and regulation, we can build a better, more reliable broadband network faster than any other country in the world and unlock the benefits for the whole UK. If that doesn’t happen, then many people will be locked out of a more connected future and the UK could lose its status as a global digital leader.”

As ever when it comes to telecoms infrastructure, the government and regulators are called on to help out with the roll-out. Openreach reckons the telecoms sector should be exempt from paying business rates for the foreseeable future, be granted better access to blocks of flats and other such buildings and get a regulatory environment more conducive to investment.

If you want to read the full report as well as Openreach’s thoughts on how the roll-out of full FTTP can be sped up then click here. To some extent Openreach is pushing at an open door here, since no one thinks faster broadband is a bad idea. This report is just part of the ongoing lobbying campaign to get the UK state to be a bit more helpful when it comes to fibre infrastructure and, presumably, to maintain the momentum created by Boris Johnson’s enthusiasm for fibre.

Government deals with difficult landlords

The UK Government has unveiled new rules which will allow telcos to speed-up the process of dealing with non-responsive landlords.

One of the challenges being faced by telcos in upgrading broadband across the country is gaining access to the right properties and land. Multi-dwelling units seem to be the biggest challenge, as some property owners are less than helpful when granting access. The new rules will speed up the process of seeking access through the courts for telcos.

“We’re pushing ahead with delivering the digital infrastructure that will underpin the UK’s future growth and boost our productivity,” said Digital Minister Nicky Morgan.

“We’ve just announced £5 billion so that people in rural communities will get gigabit speed internet at the same time as everyone else. And we’re now making sure people living in blocks of flats and apartments are not left behind either and can reap the huge benefits of the fastest and most resilient internet connections.”

Telcos claim that 40% of requests to enter a property are left unanswered by the landlords, and while we suspect this number has been inflated for the purpose of the lobbyists, access to multi-dwelling units is a persistent complaint.

“This new law is something Virgin Media has long called for – it breaks through a major broadband barrier as we invest to bring gigabit speeds to our entire, ever-growing network,” said Lutz Schüler, CEO of Virgin Media. “Giving broadband builders clear and efficient access rights will mean the many forgotten flats across the country can get the next-eneration connectivity they deserve.”

Under the current rules, telcos can petition the courts for access to properties should the landlord be unresponsive, though this process can take up-to six months and cost as much as £14,000. The new rules offer a streamlined service, reducing the action time to 6-7 weeks, and the cost to £300 per case.

Although this is only addressing a single challenge in the digital economy, it is one of the issues which has been highlighted in recent months by the telcos. Should these companies have any chance of meeting the Government’s exceptionally aggressive full-fibre deployment objectives, there are a lot of regulatory barriers which will have been be broken down. This is one, demonstrating the Government is perhaps listening to the appeals of industry.

Openreach unveils rural fibre trials

Openreach has provided some colour to the rural fibre plans, testing out new technologies and techniques, with the objective of connecting 50,000 homes by Christmas.

13 rural locations around the country have been selected to trial the new technologies and techniques. Should the pilots prove successful, the hope is full fibre deployments can be accelerated, allowing the team to meet the demands of ambitious (and potentially misguided) politicians.

“At Openreach, we’ll never just be a city fibre provider,” said CEO Clive Selley. “We’ve always worked hard to improve connections to isolated, less commercially attractive communities through inventive engineering and effective funding partnership models.

“In recent years, we’ve been extending our full fibre network into rural areas – mostly in partnership with local authorities and Government – but the economics are clearly challenging, and we want to do more.

“The trials will also give us a much clearer picture of what the technical challenges in these kinds of rural areas are. We hope they’ll go a long way towards developing the tools, skills and innovations required to make sure that nobody’s left behind in the full fibre future.”

The 13 trial locations across the UK will see Openreach test out some new equipment and techniques which it seemingly hopes will improve the commercial business case for full fibre deployment in the rural regions. Let’s not forget, while the Government clearly thinks Openreach should forget about profits in pursuit of a nationwide digital society, it is a private business with responsibilities to shareholders.

One new piece of equipment which the team will be testing is a new trench digging tool known as a ‘Diamond Cutter’. With diamonds embedded in the blades, the tool can carve through concrete much more efficiently, while simultaneously laying the tubing for fibre cables. Openreach suggests the tool could lay 700 metres of cable a day, 20 times greater than a traditional two-man team.

Another trial will focus on ‘remote nodes’. The broadband boosting equipment enables current fibre installations to be extended by 150%, allowing the team to ‘piggy back’ on existing assets. The hope is with this trial that the team will be able to avoid the expensive and time-consuming job of deploying new fibre spines to the rural locations.

What is worth noting is that while any business will look to innovation to decrease financial outlays, there is political and regulatory pressure in the background also driving the Openreach ambitions.

Announced back in June, Prime Minister Boris Johnson made the very grand proclamation that his administration would fuel a full fibre diet, reaching every household by 2025. Considering the previous objective was to fibre-up the country by 2033, the accelerated timeframe would certainly get a few people in the industry panicking.

Speaking to Telecoms.com, a few industry insiders suggested Johnson was not necessarily living in the real world with such ambitions. Not only would the financial burden of these of these plans perhaps be inhibitive, but the regulatory environment isn’t the most helpful, while the workforce would need to be super-charged. BT has since suggested the industry would have to find additional investments of £30 billion to meet the earlier deadline.

If the likes of Openreach are going to aid the Government in reaching such ambitious targets, the success of these trials will be very important. That, and finding the extra couple of billion needed to finance the projects.