Huawei founder opened up to the press, or did he?

Ren Zhengfei, the founder of Huawei, once again dismissed the allegations that Huawei has been spying for the Chinese government in a rare meeting with the media.

Huawei’s normally reclusive founder told the Financial Times on Tuesday that he missed his daughter, who was arrested in Canada and faces extradition to the US. Ren also reiterated that Huawei has not spied for the Chinese government and has not been asked to do so. “No law in China requires any company to install mandatory backdoors,” Ren was quoted by the FT.

Ren also handed out an olive branch to President Trump, calling the latter “great” and recognising the positive results the American administration’ tax cuts had delivered to the American economy. But he also warned the isolationist route the current American government is pursuing. “The message to the US I want to communicate is: collaboration and shared success. In our world of high tech, it’s increasingly impossible for any single company or country to sustain or to support the world’s needs,” Ren said. Earlier President Trump said he ‘would intervene on Huawei CFO’s case to help China trade deal’.

When it comes to Huawei’s tactics to navigate the difficulties it faces in the western markets, Ren conceded “it’s always been the case, you can’t work with everyone . . . we’ll shift our focus to better serve countries that welcome Huawei,” he told the reporter.

By the founder’s own standard, this interview was a rare opportunity for the outside world to get more transparency of the company he set up 32 years ago. But we were not made much wiser on a few key questions.

Huawei’s CFO, and Ren’s daughter, was charged with misleading the American banks with false information on Huawei’s relationship with its subsidiary related to the company’s business in Iran, which resulted in the banks being handed multi-billion dollar fines. Ren’s interview did not shed new light on the case, despite expressing his parental feeling.

In the spirit of “presumed innocent until proved guilty”, we should believe that the Huawei founder was telling the truth when he claimed Huawei has not spied on behalf of the Chinese government. His words were also carefully chosen when he claimed, “no law in China requires any company to install mandatory backdoors”, which is true. Law enforcement agencies may require companies or private persons to assist their work. In some jurisdictions the companies or individuals have the legal right to refuse, as Apple did in 2015 when being asked by the FBI to unlock an iPhone used by the San Bernardino attackers.

In other jurisdictions companies and individuals are obliged to comply with such demands.

China’s Intelligence Law was passed by the National People’s Congress, China’s legislature, in June 2017 and entered into force the following day. Two articles of the law are of interest here:

Article 7: An organization or citizen shall support, assist in and cooperate in national intelligence work in accordance with the law and keep confidential the national intelligence work that it or he knows. (Translation by the Law School, Peking University)

Article 14: National intelligence work institutions, when carrying out intelligence work according to laws, may ask relevant institutions, organizations and citizens to provide necessary support, assistance and cooperation. (Translation by QUARTZ)

In plain language this means the intelligence agencies have the mandate to require any institutions or individuals to cooperate (Article 14) and the institutions or individuals must comply (Article 7).

Therefore Ren, who declared “I still love my country, I support the Communist party” to the FT journalist, is law-bound to say Huawei has “never received any request from any government to provide improper information”, no matter whether it has received requests of this kind or not. Hypothetically, if Huawei had received requests from the Chinese intelligence agencies to assist their tasks, it could not refuse, otherwise it would be violating the first half of Article 7. On the other hand, if Huawei, hypothetically, had carried out intelligence tasks as required, it could not tell anyone, otherwise it would be violating the second half of Article 7.

But, seriously, no one would have expected an alternative answer.

Huawei employee arrested in Poland on spying allegations

Huawei’s sales director in Poland, who previously served in the Chinese diplomatic corps, has been arrested by the Polish authorities on spying allegations. Huawei immediately terminated his employment.

More details have been disclosed related to the arrest of Wang Weijing, who also goes by the name Stanislaw Wang. After serving as attaché at the Chinese general consulate in Gdansk, Wang joined Huawei’s Poland office in 2011, first as its PR director then as its sales director responsible for selling to the Polish public sector. Wang was detained on 8 January, on allegations of spying, as was first reported by the Polish public broadcaster TVP.

According to TVP, an Orange employee arrested on the same allegations, identified as Piotr D, had worked at the country’s Internal Security Agency (ISA, or “Agencja Bezpieczeństwa Wewnętrznego (ABW)” in Polish), which carried out the arrests. While at ISA one of his responsibilities was issuing security certificates for equipment used by Poland’s public-sector offices. He left the agency earlier after being accused of corruption but was not formally charged.

The offices of Huawei and Orange were searched respectively following the arrests, though a spokesperson for ISA told Reuters that the allegations against Wang were related to individual actions, not directly linked to Huawei. This is also the line Huawei adopted when it promptly severed the employment relationship with Wang, citing that “in accordance with the terms and conditions of Huawei’s labour contract, we have made this decision because the incident has brought Huawei into disrepute.”

Orange said it did not know if the investigation in Piotr D. was linked to his professional work but would continue to cooperate with the authorities.

Despite the troubles it has run into in markets like the US, New Zealand, Japan, and the UK, Huawei’s business in Eastern Europe has been largely unperturbed. However the latest twist in Poland and the earlier arrest of Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s CFO, in Canada might put this position under pressure. On Saturday 12 January, Joachim Brudzinski, Poland’s interior minister, called for a EU-NATO joint position with regard to banning Huawei from these markets when speaking on a Polish commercial radio station. “There are concerns about Huawei within NATO as well. It would make most sense to have a joint stance, among EU member states and NATO members,” said Brudzinski.

Then on Sunday 13 January, Karol Okonski, a government official responsible for cyber security, told Reuters that Poland could consider forbidding the public sector from using Huawei products while probing the legal measures to limit Huawei’s access to the private sector. “We do not have the legal means to force private companies or citizens to stop using any IT company’s products. It cannot be ruled out that we will consider legislative changes that would allow such a move,” Okonski said.

Huawei has always denied that it poses security threats, or it spies on behalf of the Chinese government. In a statement it sent out to media after its CFO’s arrest and it sent again after the arrests in Poland, Huawei stressed that it “complies with all applicable laws and regulations in the countries where it operates, and we require every employee to abide by the laws and regulations in the countries where they are based.”

Incidentally, the South China Morning Post reported earlier that, shortly before her arrest in Canada, Meng Wanzhou and Ren Zhengfei, the founder of Huawei and Meng’s father, hosted a town hall meeting for Huawei employees. According to a transcript distributed to Huawei staff and seen by SCMP, both executives discussed extensively on compliance. Cases were divided into “red” and “yellow” lines. By red line, Meng meant the rules where there is “no bargaining and must be strictly complied with”, while by yellow line she referred to cases where strict compliance is not operationally feasible, and the company can build in the costs of flouting the rules as “sunk costs.” She cited labour risks as an example.

“Of course, beyond the yellow and red lines, there may still be another scenario, and that is where the external rules are clear-cut and there’s no contention, but the company is totally unable to comply with in actual operations. In such cases, after a reasonable decision-making process, one may accept the risk of temporary non-compliance,” quoted by SCMP.

Ren also urged his staff to consider both cost and benefit in compliance cases, especially related to laws of the US and EU. SCMP quoted him challenging those present when answering a question: “We must not bind ourselves up just because the US is attacking us. If our hands and feet are bound, then we will not be able to continue producing, then what’s the point of compliance?”

Xiaomi unveils new strategy stressing AI, IoT and smartphones

The Chinese device maker Xiaomi has announced its new strategy will be built around two core areas: smartphone and AI+IoT.

At the company’s annual party, Lei Jun, Xiaomi’s founder and CEO, pledged an investment of CNY 10 billion ($1.5 billion) over the next five years, in a strategy it calls AIoT (meaning both “AI+IoT” and “All in IoT”). The objective is to develop this part of the business into a second core of the company’s strategy, to dovetail with its current core business: smartphones.

Xiaomi is no stranger to artificial intelligence. AI has been in the centre of Xiaomi’s marketing messages for its photo technologies on the new smartphones and the smart speakers. Nor has it been a novice in IoT. In fact, Xiaomi claims to be the world’s largest IoT company, “connecting more than 132 million smart devices (excluding mobile phones and laptops), including more than 20 million daily active devices as of September 30 (2018).” This mainly comes in its smart home category including products ranging from smart suitcases to smart scooters and everything in between.

Smartphone, on the other hand, has always been the linchpin in Xiaomi’s ecosystem. After its fast growth in China and the rapid market share gain in emerging markets like India, Xiaomi recently expanded into Europe, including choosing to debut its latest flagship smartphone in London. Additionally, Xiaomi sees in Latin America new growth opportunites. It is also one of the smartphone OEMs to endorse Qualcomm’s 5G chipset. However, as Lei recognised, “Before the proliferation of 5G technology, Xiaomi’s success in smartphone business segment lies in striving to consolidate its leading position in the smartphone markets across the world.”

As a means to continue strengthening its smartphone positions, Xiaomi also announced a dual-brand strategy. Its flagship and other high-end products will continue to come under the “Mi” brand, while the mid-range value-for-money products will carry the “Redmi” brand. Here Xiaomi may have taken a page from Huawei’s brand strategy, which has used “Honor” to address the mid-range segment while its flagship products have been branded “Huawei” and come in Mate or Pro series.

Apple iPhone sales plunged by 20% in November – Counterpoint

Facing more affordable competition from the Chinese brands, the iPhone’s total sales suffered a 20% decline in November, with the cheaper XR model outselling the more expensive models, according to an update from Counterpoint.

The research firm published its monthly update on iPhone sales for November, estimating that the decline was across the board. In Europe and North America, replacement cycles are getting longer while operators are reducing their subsidies, both trends playing to the decline of iPhone sales.

One exception was China, where the sales held largely thanks to the 11.11 (“Single’s Day”) sale, where all online channels would hand out discounts. However, the China market is expected to go down in December. On one hand the Single Day sales already satisfied much of the demand; on the other hand, the ongoing trade war with the US has pumped anti-American sentiment into some consumers, which Tim Cook also employed to explain away the weakness in its phone business.

When it comes to the model breakdown, Counterpoint said the best-selling model was XR, the cheapest among the three new models recently launched. More specifically, the 64GB version, the one with the smallest memory, was selling the best. This is in stark contrast to a year ago, when the best-selling model was the then newly launched iPhone X, the most expensive one in the new line-up. The research firm also concluded that when looking at the performances of the two most expensive models of the two years, the “iPhone XS Max, when compared to iPhone X during the same month last year, shows a 46% decline in sales.”

iPhone-November-Sales-2017-vs-2018

The decline should not come as a surprise though. In all markets the Chinese brands are gaining momentum, not the least in emerging markets like India, where smartphone market is still expanding. “iPhone has never achieved a significant share of the Indian market because it’s just too expensive. It rarely makes it above 1% of the overall market or 2% of the smartphone market. Recent changes to import taxes made the cost even more prohibitive. Apple has now decided to start assembling in India through Foxconn. This should help offset the import taxes it currently has to pay. This move may also be a hedge against potential damage from the ongoing China/US trade war.” Peter Richardson, research director and partner at Counterpoint told Telecoms.com. “However, while Apple’s brand is certainly well-regarded, Indian consumers have become accustomed to the quality of Chinese Android products, from players such as Xiaomi, Vivo and Oppo. It is questionable whether they will see the value in iOS relative to these Chinese players that are innovating much faster. Huawei (and Honor) has also been a marginal presence so far, but is expected to grow relatively quickly, adding to the market’s competitive landscape,” Richardson added.

Even in the more advanced markets Apple has shown weakness for a while. Earlier we reported that Apple was compensating the Japanese operators to offer discount and considering reviving iPhone X in Japan to boost sales.

Samsung and LG set to launch 5G smartphones in February

The Korean media has reported that the world smartphone leader Samsung and its struggling compatriot are going to launch the first 5G smartphones at MWC and ship in March.

According to a report by the Korean media outlet Pulse, citing its industry source, that both Samsung and LG will debut their 5G smartphones in February next year. Volume shipment is expected to start in March, which will synchronise with the start of 5G service for consumers by the three operators. All three of them launched limited 5G services for business simultaneously at the beginning of December.

Mobile World Congress has long been the venue for Samsung to showcase its latest Galaxy flagship product. It will be the series’ 10th iteration next year, so we can expect quite a bit of fanfare to go with the occasion. Whether the Galaxy 10 will be built on 5G, or there will be a 5G variant of the product, is up to speculation.

LG has seen its smartphone market share shrinking in recent years and already posted over $400 million loss in the first three quarters of the year. As a result, the head of its Mobile Communications business was replaced one year into the job. LG would desperately need something to excite the market if the company still decides to stay in the handset market. The expected 5G product could be a new model of its flagship G series, or the new head of its mobile business could decide to rewrite its product portfolio.

Both companies are expected to build their first 5G smartphones on the newly launched Qualcomm Snapdragon 855 chipset, which we have reported in detail. Samsung was one of the illustrious partners to adorn the launch event, but LG was absent. With a long line of OEMs, especially the Chinese smartphone makers showing strong interest in the new Snapdragon, we can expect more 5G handsets to be launched in Barcelona come February than those from the Korean stalwarts.

Going under the hood of Qualcomm Snapdragon 855: plenty to like

More details of Qualcomm’s first 5G chipset have been released, bringing all-round improvements, and a 5G chipset for PCs was also announced.

On the first day of its annual Snapdragon Technology Summit, Qualcomm announced its 5G chipset for mobile devices, the Snapdragon 855, but released limited specs. On the following two days more details were disclosed. An SoC for 5G-connected PCs, the Snapdragon 8cx was also unveiled.

In addition to the X50 modem for 5G connectivity (on both mmWave and sub-6GHz frequencies) and X24 modem (to provide LTE connectivity), at the centre of the Snapdragon 855 is ARM’s new flagship Cortex A76 CPU, marketed by Qualcomm as Kryo 485. It contains 8 cores with the single core top performance at 2.84 GHz. Qualcomm claims the 855 is 45% faster than its predecessor 845, though it did not specify what exactly this refers to. More importantly for Qualcomm, the top speed is 9% faster than the Kirin 980 from HiSilicon (a Huawei subsidiary), another 7-nanometre implementation of the ARM Cortex A76.

Also included in the 855 is the new Adreno 640 GPU rendering graphics. Qualcomm has focused 855’s marketing messages on gaming performance, and the GPU is at the core to deliver it. Qualcomm claims the new GPU will enable true HDR gaming, as well as support the HDR10+ and Dolby Vision formats. Together with the display IP, the Adreno 640 GPU will support 120fps gaming as well as smooth 8K 360-degree video playback. Another feature highlighted is the support for Physically Based Rendering in graphics, which will help improve VR and AR experience, including more accurate lighting physics and material interactions, for example more life-like surface texture, or material-on-material audio interaction.

The key new feature on Snapdragon’s Hexagon 690 DSP is that it now includes a dedicated Machine Learning (ML) inferencing engine in the new “tensor accelerator”. The Hexagon 690 also doubles the number of HVX vector pipelines over its predecessors the Hexagon 680 and 685, to include four 1024b vector pipelines. The doubled computing power and the dedicated ML engine combined are expected to improve the Snapdragon 855’s AI capability by a big margin.

The integrated new Spectra 380 image signalling processor (ISP) will both improve the Snapdragon’s capability to deepen acceleration and to save power consumption when processing images. Qualcomm believes the new ISP will only consume a quarter of the power as its predecessor for image object classification, object segmentation, depth sensing (at 60 FPS), augmented reality body tracking, and image stabilisation.

On the OEM collaboration side, in addition to Samsung, on day 2 of the event we also saw Pete Lau, the CEO of Chinese smartphone maker OnePlus come to the stage to endorse the new 5G chipset and vow to be the “first to feature” the Snapdragon 855. Separately, the British mobile operator EE announced that it will range a OnePlus 5G smartphone in the first half of 2019.

On the same day, thousands of miles away, more Chinese smartphone OEMs including Xiaomi, OPPO, Vivo, and ZTE (in addition to OnePlus) also embraced the new Snapdragon chipset at the China Mobile Global Partner Conference in Guangzhou, southern China. China Mobile will also launch a customer premise equipment (CPE), likely a fixed wireless access modem, using the same platform.

Back in Hawaii, on day 3 of the Snapdragon Tech Summit, Qualcomm launched a new chipset for PC: the Snapdragon 8cx (“c” for computer, “x” for eXtreme). This is Qualcomm’s third iteration of chipset for PC, built on ARM v8.1 (a variant of Cortex A76). Similar to the Snapdragon 855, the 8cx also has the X24 integrated cellular modem with for LTE connectivity, and the X50 modem with 5G connectivity can be paired with it. The CPU also has eight cores, with a top speed of 2.75 GHz. The new Adreno 680 GPU is said to process graphics twice as fast as the GPU in the previous generation ARM for Windows chipset (Snapdragon 850) but 60% more efficient in power consumption.

Perhaps the most meaningful change is its memory architecture. The Snapdragon 8cx will have a 128-bit wide interface, enabling it to provide native support for much more software and applications, including Windows 10 Enterprise and Office 365, which clearly is a sales pitch to the corporate IT departments.

Unlike the OEM support garnered by Snapdragon 855, there was no public endorsement by PC makers yet. Lenovo did come to the stage but was only talking about its Yoga 2-in-1 notebooks that have used earlier generations of Snapdragon chipsets for Windows on ARM. On the other hand, Qualcomm does not position Snapdragon 8cx as a replacement for the 850 but rather as a higher end contemporary, with 850 mainly targeted at a niche consumer market.

In general, this year’s Snapdragon Tech Summit has delivered more step change with the new product launches. More concrete industry support was also on show, indicating that, depending on how fast and extensive 5G is to be rolled out, we may start seeing true 5G smartphones in the first half of next year. We may need to wait a bit longer before a reasonable line-up of always-on 5G connected PCs can hit the market.

USA declares war on Huawei, with a bit of help from ZTE

The arrest of Huawei’s CFO was the culmination of years of investigation by the American government and judiciary, with an apparent helping hand from ZTE.

When Ms. Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s CFO, was arrested in Vancouver, facing extradition to the US, we remembered a file seized and published by the US Department of Commerce when it was investigating then punishing Huawei’s domestic competitor ZTE early in the year, which detailed some of the ways ZTE had gone about the activities that got it into trouble.

The internal document (in Chinese) from ZTE, dated 25 August 2011 includes detailed proposals on how to circumvent American embargos against Iran, Sudan, North Korea, Syria, Cuba, as well as partial sanctions against Ethiopia and Myanmar. It was approved by ZTE’s C-level executives by the beginning of September. The document was used as an incriminating evidence against ZTE, which, in addition to the fines, also resulted in the wholesale change of management in ZTE.

Part II, Section 5 of the document refers to a company codenamed F7 which was also active in similar business dealings with risky countries. F7 used an IT company with good credibility as the front party to sign contracts with their customers in countries facing US sanctions. ZTE also gathered competitive intelligence on the compliance officers and lawyers hired by F7 in head offices as well as in branches offices to handle export embargo circumvention, including the salary offers. The document then proposed ZTE should use this as a blueprint.

The identity of F7 is not hard to establish. IHuawei was the only other large-scale telecom equipment exporter from China, F7 had been barred by Congress from winning meaningful deals in the US, it had hired a Chinese-American lawyer from TI, and it had a joint-venture with Symantec. If this evidence is still too circumstantial, the document also listed specifically that F7 had run into difficulty in its attempted acquisition of 3Leaf, an American server technology company, in 2010. It was widely covered at the time by media outlets including the Reuters that Huawei decided to pull out of the proposed acquisition of and to divest its assets in 3Leaf.

This ZTE document must have been just one piece on the jigsaw of evidence against Huawei put together by the American law-enforcement, but it no doubt would be an important piece. It suggests that Huawei has been flouting US rules for quite some time, and Ms. Meng, as the CFO (as well as the daughter of the founder of Huawei) may have been presumaed to have had some role to play in the whole ploy.

According to sources inside ZTE, “F7” is ZTE’s internal tongue-in-cheek reference to Huawei. Phonetically F7 reads a slight corruption of the word for “husband and wife” in Chinese. It derives from the urban legend that many Huawei employees, having little time to date outside, would end up marrying their colleagues, so the company was full of couples.

Huawei CFO arrested in Canada, facing extradition to the US

Meng Wanzhou, Huawei CFO, was arrested in Canada at the request of the US judiciary, with suspicions the company violated trade sanctions placed on Iran by the US.

The fallout between Huawei and the US authorities is reaching Shakespearean scale. On 1 December, Meng Wanzhou, Huawei’s CFO, vice-chair of the Board, and the daughter of the founder of the company, was arrested while in transit at the Vancouver airport, while in transit to China. Several media outlets originally reported the arrest, though it has now been confirmed by Huawei.

“She is sought for extradition by the United States, and a bail hearing has been set for Friday,” Justice Department spokesman Ian McLeod said in a statement to the Canadian newspaper. “As there is a publication ban in effect, we cannot provide any further detail at this time. The ban was sought by Ms. Meng.”

Canadian law-enforcement source suggest the arrest was made at the request of the United States, which has alleged Huawei, and Ms. Meng, violated American embargo against Iran. A New York Times report quoted Senator Ben Sasse that the US Treasury and Commerce Department also asked the Justice Department to investigate Huawei for possibly violating the same sanctions.

Huawei denied the allegation in its statement to our sister publication Light Reading, claiming “Huawei complies with all applicable laws and regulations where it operates, including applicable export control and sanction laws and regulations of the UN, US and EU.”

Referring to the arrest of Ms. Meng, Huawei added that it “has been provided with very little information regarding the charges and is not aware of any wrongdoing by Ms. Meng. The company believes the Canadian and U.S. legal systems will ultimately reach a just conclusion.”

It has been reported that earlier in the year when ZTE was being investigated, documents seized the US prosecutors included Huawei’s files detailing the methods it used to insulate itself through third parties when trading with Iran, which ZTE meant to use as a blueprint but did not quite pull off. The investigators might have been following the lead.

The ZTE dealings with Iran eventually led to the firm being barred from using any US components or IP within its own supply chain, almost destroying the company itself. Logic would suggest the US would use a similar game plan here, though many suggest Huawei supply chain is not as reliant on the US as ZTE’s is.

The timing of the report was also interesting. The arrest took place on the same day as the American and Chinese presidents agreed on the 90-truce to the trade war and a myriad of issues. For four days there was no mention of the arrest in any media or official channels, and the Chinese Embassy in Canada only lodged a complaint, much angrier than the Huawei statement, after the report came out. One can only speculate that efforts to scramble a deal behind the scenes must have failed.

The ultra-nationalistic Global Times went one step further with a call to arms:

The latest episode of the wrangling between Huawei and the US certain will not help Huawei’s business prospect in the western markets, where it has been barred by a few prominent states. Nor will it provide any confidence in the prospect for a truce between the American and Chinese presidents. All Asian stock markets have fallen roughly 2% after the news broke.

Qualcomm pumps Snapdragon 855 in Hawaii

The chipset company Qualcomm just unveiled the newest Snapdragon SoC product to power 5G mobile devices.

On the first day of its annual “Snapdragon Tech Summit” in Hawaii, Qualcomm introduced its first commercial 5G chipset, branded as Snapdragon 855. The system is compatible with Qualcomm’s X50 modem with antennae supporting 5G on both sub-6GHz and mmWave frequency bands. On a 7-nm silicon will also be its 4th-generation multi-core on-device AI engine (said to deliver 3X faster AI performance than its predecessor the Snapdragon 845), Computer Vision Image Signal Processor (CV-ISP) for new photo and video features (“true 4K HDR video capture, cinema-grade photography capabilities”), and 3D Sonic Sensor. The sonic sensor can be used for under-display fingerprint reading using ultrasonic waves (instead of the current optical under-display sensors using light), which, Qualcomm claims, is safer and more accurate.

Qualcomm expects the first smartphones using the new chipset to hit the market in the first half of next year. “The Snapdragon 855 will define the premium tier in 2019,” said Alex Katouzian, SVP and GM of Mobile for Qualcomm, who unveiled the new chipset. Earlier Cristiano Amon, Qualcomm’s President, said he expected to see a lot of phone announcements at CES in January and a lot of actual phone launches at MWC in February.

“Today marks a massive and exciting step forward underscoring how Qualcomm Technologies and ecosystem leaders are driving 5G commercialization, a journey that went from R&D, accelerated standardization and trials, the launch of innovative products and technologies, to the imminent launch of 5G networks and smartphones across the globe starting in early 2019,” said Amon at yesterday’s event. “Together we are demonstrating our role in transforming the mobile industry and enriching consumer experiences with 5G mobile devices on live 5G networks at this year’s Qualcomm Snapdragon Technology Summit.”

Executives from mobile operators including AT&T, EE, Telstra, and Verizon were present at the event, so were representatives from Ericsson, Samsung, Motorola, NETGEAR, and Inseego. The 5G smartphone from Samsung to be launched by both Verizon and AT&T is likely to be the first of its kind to be built on Snapdragon 855.

“At Samsung, we have a vision of a connected world powered by 5G that will benefit consumers, communities, industries and governments,” said Justin Denison, SVP for mobile product strategy and marketing at Samsung Electronics America. “5G will fuel collaboration, connectivity and productivity worldwide, and we’re excited to be at the forefront working alongside partners like Qualcomm Technologies to make the transformation to 5G a reality.”

The event will last three days till Thursday, and Qualcomm promised more announcements and more details will be released.

Korea switches on 5G

All three of Korea’s major mobile operators switched on 5G networks simultaneous at midnight on 1 December, offering business FWA based on 3GPP standards.

The launches marked Korea as the first country to have more than one commercial 5G network. The largest operator SKT, launched the service in 13 cities, while LG U+ plans to expand its 5G coverage to 85 cities by the end of the year. KT, the second largest mobile operator and the leading fixed-line services provider, which recently suffered a fire damage to its cable tunnel, is said to be only covering the greater Seoul area with its 5G network.

The services offered are limited to business users on fixed-wireless access. The launch at LG U+ was signalled by a video call made from a PC by the operator’s Vice Chairman. SKT’s CEO made a call using a prototype 5G smartphone. Both the wireless router and the prototype phone were supplied by Samsung, which sent out a congratulatory tweet for the occasion: