Interview: Wagner Morais, Cyber Security Consultant at VIVO Brazil

Telecoms.com periodically invites expert third parties to share their views on the industry’s most pressing issues. In this piece Francesca Greane, Marketing, Content and Community Lead for 5G Latin America 2020, spoke with Wagner Morais – Cyber Security Consultant at VIVO Brazil – to discuss the new security threats that are surrounding the emergence of 5G in Latin America.

5G Latin America: In your opinion, what are the latest security threats when it comes to 5G in Latin America?

Wagner Morais (WM): The biggest threat to 5G security is to fail to comply with these practices and not to implement continuous supervision mechanisms with regard to security aiming at the integrity of the control and administration plan, as well as the implementation of interconnection supervision mechanisms (IPx). Most threats and fraud start with network interconnections. One thing is certain, the 5G network will inherit all the vulnerabilities of 4G networks, and research indicates that 100% of 5G networks are vulnerable to Denial of Service (dos) attacks. , privacy is another challenge threats like semantic information attacks, time attacks, and border attacks are primarily aimed at subscriber location privacy.

5G Latin America: What are the new threats that are being created by the move to 5G in Latin America?

WM:  In addition to the vulnerabilities inherited from the 4G network, we will have the growth of DDos attacks, and the possibility to exploit flaws to track the location of the cell phone and even transmit false emergency alerts.

5G Latin America: Is building infrastructure a cause for concern or an opportunity for new security architecture?

WM: The 5G infrastructure remains the most disruptive technology in recent years, I understand that it is an opportunity to explore this technology and the demand for 5G infrastructure and the incredible benefits offered by this technology have stimulated the investment of the main market participants. The security architecture is a great challenge, as new threats have emerged, and many challenges are to come.

5G Latin America: What are your recommendations for service providers and solution providers to evaporate these security fears?

WM: Investment in infrastructure and partnerships with companies that already have security tools and solutions for networks 4 and 5G with proven positive results and network security because of a greater exposure to attacks and a greater number of potential entry points for attackers. With 5G networks increasingly based on software, the risks associated with important security flaws, such as those resulting from bad software development processes at the suppliers themselves, are gaining importance. Therefore, the need for research and investments in security.

5G Latin America: What difficulties do the likes of IoT and new business verticals present in terms of this security question?

WM: One of the biggest concerns will be with the number of connected IoT devices. Security companies say that by 2020 there will be about 20 billion of these devices. And, no wonder, the number of Internet of Things attacks is increasing because device protection is poor and malware distribution is easily scalable. The company found 800,000 vulnerable devices last year. And, to avoid attacks of great destruction capacity, with threat of interruption of services, operators with 5G will have to develop new threat models more in tune with these realities.

5G Latin America: What are your recommendations for overcoming these challenges?

WM: All good security practices regarding the segregation of the entire control infrastructure, separation (micro / nano segmentation) of resources, reducing possible attack surfaces, as well as policies for hardening and approving equipment from the security point of view are necessary, 5G security starts “by design”, that is, all components are designed with security bias. In addition, it is necessary to create mechanisms for continuous security auditing in the various plans (control, data, administration). Not forgetting the continuous training and awareness of teams working on 5G systems.

Wagner Morais will be joining our speaker line-up for 5G Latin America 2020. Joining our Cyber Security Panel, Wagner will go into further detail on the security threats that are surrounding the emergence of 5G in Latin America, and how the ecosystem can overcome these emerging challenges.

 

Be in the audience for Wagner’s discussion, and join us for three-days of content focused on how operators and solution providers can unleash the 5G future in Latin America. Operators you can claim your FREE pass to 5G Latin America 2020 by clicking here. Solution providers, don’t miss out on your full-access pass by clicking here to purchase now.

Benign brother has got your back: China launches coronavirus app

China’s government bodies and businesses have jointly launched a mobile app to help detect if people have been in close contact with those suspected of carrying the novel coronavirus.

The app has access to multiple official holders of private data. By registering with his or her name and Chinese ID number, a smartphone user can use the app, called “Close Contact Detector” to check if he or she has been in proximity of those who are later either confirmed or suspected to have the virus. Such close contacts include travelling in the same train carriage or sitting within three rows on the same flight with those carrying the virus.

One registered user can check the status of up to three users by inputting their ID numbers and names. One ID number is limited to one check per day. The app will then return an assessment of which category the individual in question falls into: Confirmed case, Suspected case, Close contact, Normal. Xinhua, one of the major official propaganda outlets, reported that over 105 million checks have been made by users three days after the app was launched.

The app development was led by the government organisations responsible for health which was joined by China Electronics Technology Group, one of the country’s largest state-owned enterprises, as well as the leading smartphone makers Huawei, Xiaomi, OPPO, and Vivo. The backend data comes out of the National Health Commission, the Ministry of Transport, China State Railway Group Company, the state owned enterprise that operates all the rail transport in China, and the Civil Aviation Administration, the aviation regulator.

The fact that private travel data is made readily available to business entities without explicit consent from the individuals involved may raise plenty of eyebrows in places like Europe, but the attitude in China is different. “From a Chinese perspective this is a really useful service for people… It’s a really powerful tool that really shows the power of data being used for good,” Carolyn Bigg, a Hong Kong-based lawyer, told the BBC.

“Close Contact Detector” has been pushed out by the smartphone brands as a priority app to their users in China. It is unclear how or if promoting to users of other smartphone brands, iOS users, or non-smartphone users, will be conducted. Nor is it clear if there are plans to extend the coverage to residents without a Chinese ID number, such as foreign nationals staying in China.

Telecoms.com has learned that over the last few weeks there have been other online tools to help concerned users check if they had unknowingly come into contact with confirmed victims of the new coronavirus. The key difference from the new contact detector is that, in the earlier attempts, backend data was crowdsourced from publicly available information including the flight and train numbers of the confirmed cases published in the media.

Neither is contact detector the only use case where user data is playing a role. A recent video clip making rounds on social media shows a drone flying a blown-up QR code that drivers can scan to register before they enter Shenzhen after the long Chinese New Year break. The method is deployed presumably to prevent cars and drivers registered to the major disease hit regions from going through, as well as reduce human-to-human interaction. Xinhua reported that the Shenzhen Police, which is responsible for managing the local traffic and owns the automobile and driver data, is behind this measure.

Xiaomi, Oppo and Vivo create ‘Peer-to-Peer Transmission Alliance’

Three Chinese smartphone vendors have created a cross-brand alliance to enable wireless file transfer without needing the internet.

The tie-up between the three brands will ensure WiFi Direct is supported on all devices moving forward, effectively allowed smartphones to pair to enable the transfer of files, including photos, videos and music, without being online.

“This expansion of the Peer-to-Peer Transmission Alliance to global users all the more underlines Xiaomi’s longstanding commitment of bringing innovation to everyone,” said Chew Shou Zi, SVP of Xiaomi.

“By joining hands with Vivo and Oppo, two industry leaders that have a strong user base, we are expecting to benefit smartphone users globally. Xiaomi will continue to bring more strategic partnerships of this sort to our users and Mi Fans.”

The idea of WiFi Direct is relatively simple. Two compatible devices simply connect to each other, creating an ‘ad hoc network’ and cutting out the middle-man; the internet. Users can simply turn on the feature, select the desired device, before transferring whatever content they want. This could be useful down the pub, but equally when transferring documents to a printer or displaying a video on a TV screen.

This is not necessarily a new idea, but it is a useful one. Numerous companies, including Xiaomi, have introduced such features though they are contained within their own ecosystem. Xiaomi devices could link-up to other Xiaomi devices, though this alliance between the three OEMs is a positive step towards expanding the ecosystem and usefulness of the feature.

Going under the hood of Qualcomm Snapdragon 855: plenty to like

More details of Qualcomm’s first 5G chipset have been released, bringing all-round improvements, and a 5G chipset for PCs was also announced.

On the first day of its annual Snapdragon Technology Summit, Qualcomm announced its 5G chipset for mobile devices, the Snapdragon 855, but released limited specs. On the following two days more details were disclosed. An SoC for 5G-connected PCs, the Snapdragon 8cx was also unveiled.

In addition to the X50 modem for 5G connectivity (on both mmWave and sub-6GHz frequencies) and X24 modem (to provide LTE connectivity), at the centre of the Snapdragon 855 is ARM’s new flagship Cortex A76 CPU, marketed by Qualcomm as Kryo 485. It contains 8 cores with the single core top performance at 2.84 GHz. Qualcomm claims the 855 is 45% faster than its predecessor 845, though it did not specify what exactly this refers to. More importantly for Qualcomm, the top speed is 9% faster than the Kirin 980 from HiSilicon (a Huawei subsidiary), another 7-nanometre implementation of the ARM Cortex A76.

Also included in the 855 is the new Adreno 640 GPU rendering graphics. Qualcomm has focused 855’s marketing messages on gaming performance, and the GPU is at the core to deliver it. Qualcomm claims the new GPU will enable true HDR gaming, as well as support the HDR10+ and Dolby Vision formats. Together with the display IP, the Adreno 640 GPU will support 120fps gaming as well as smooth 8K 360-degree video playback. Another feature highlighted is the support for Physically Based Rendering in graphics, which will help improve VR and AR experience, including more accurate lighting physics and material interactions, for example more life-like surface texture, or material-on-material audio interaction.

The key new feature on Snapdragon’s Hexagon 690 DSP is that it now includes a dedicated Machine Learning (ML) inferencing engine in the new “tensor accelerator”. The Hexagon 690 also doubles the number of HVX vector pipelines over its predecessors the Hexagon 680 and 685, to include four 1024b vector pipelines. The doubled computing power and the dedicated ML engine combined are expected to improve the Snapdragon 855’s AI capability by a big margin.

The integrated new Spectra 380 image signalling processor (ISP) will both improve the Snapdragon’s capability to deepen acceleration and to save power consumption when processing images. Qualcomm believes the new ISP will only consume a quarter of the power as its predecessor for image object classification, object segmentation, depth sensing (at 60 FPS), augmented reality body tracking, and image stabilisation.

On the OEM collaboration side, in addition to Samsung, on day 2 of the event we also saw Pete Lau, the CEO of Chinese smartphone maker OnePlus come to the stage to endorse the new 5G chipset and vow to be the “first to feature” the Snapdragon 855. Separately, the British mobile operator EE announced that it will range a OnePlus 5G smartphone in the first half of 2019.

On the same day, thousands of miles away, more Chinese smartphone OEMs including Xiaomi, OPPO, Vivo, and ZTE (in addition to OnePlus) also embraced the new Snapdragon chipset at the China Mobile Global Partner Conference in Guangzhou, southern China. China Mobile will also launch a customer premise equipment (CPE), likely a fixed wireless access modem, using the same platform.

Back in Hawaii, on day 3 of the Snapdragon Tech Summit, Qualcomm launched a new chipset for PC: the Snapdragon 8cx (“c” for computer, “x” for eXtreme). This is Qualcomm’s third iteration of chipset for PC, built on ARM v8.1 (a variant of Cortex A76). Similar to the Snapdragon 855, the 8cx also has the X24 integrated cellular modem with for LTE connectivity, and the X50 modem with 5G connectivity can be paired with it. The CPU also has eight cores, with a top speed of 2.75 GHz. The new Adreno 680 GPU is said to process graphics twice as fast as the GPU in the previous generation ARM for Windows chipset (Snapdragon 850) but 60% more efficient in power consumption.

Perhaps the most meaningful change is its memory architecture. The Snapdragon 8cx will have a 128-bit wide interface, enabling it to provide native support for much more software and applications, including Windows 10 Enterprise and Office 365, which clearly is a sales pitch to the corporate IT departments.

Unlike the OEM support garnered by Snapdragon 855, there was no public endorsement by PC makers yet. Lenovo did come to the stage but was only talking about its Yoga 2-in-1 notebooks that have used earlier generations of Snapdragon chipsets for Windows on ARM. On the other hand, Qualcomm does not position Snapdragon 8cx as a replacement for the 850 but rather as a higher end contemporary, with 850 mainly targeted at a niche consumer market.

In general, this year’s Snapdragon Tech Summit has delivered more step change with the new product launches. More concrete industry support was also on show, indicating that, depending on how fast and extensive 5G is to be rolled out, we may start seeing true 5G smartphones in the first half of next year. We may need to wait a bit longer before a reasonable line-up of always-on 5G connected PCs can hit the market.

Turns out Qualcomm’s Chinese buddies oppose Broadcom’s takeover bid

Qualcomm seems keen to enlist the services of its new set of Chinese allies in some of its many other fights.

A report in the FT (sub required) claims “Qualcomm has won the backing of a group of Chinese smartphone manufacturers in its fight to fend off a $130bn hostile bid from rival Broadcom.” Those vendors are: Xiaomi, Oppo and Vivo, and by staggering coincidence the three of them have just pledged their undying loyalty to Qualcomm as customers of its 5G chips.

“When we first heard of [the Broadcom bid], our biggest concern was, if it happened, would there still be era-defining communications products?” said Lin Bin, President of Xiaomi, and the FT didn’t seem to get any other quotes from smartphone vendors.

As well as the ongoing Broadcom thing Qualcomm still hasn’t had its acquisition of NXP approved, with the Chinese being the last set of regulators to make up their mind on the matter. With that in mind Qualcomm President Cristiano Amon has been buttering up the Chinese government while he’s over there, and apparently reckons all the friends it has made in China will give it brownie points with the regulators.

“The remarks by Qualcomm’s partners will certainly influence any future decision by Chinese regulators over the Broadcom bid,” said Cui Kai, an analyst at IDC, in the FT piece. “China is trying to upgrade its manufacturing. These manufacturers highly rely on Qualcomm, and that will be an important consideration for the regulators.”

Amon concluded that, since US companies like Apple are giving it such a hard time, then China suddenly looks like a more rewarding place to hang out, even going so far as to praise China as a good place to do business with intellectual property. This would appear to put Qualcomm squarely at odds with the US government and may yet end up being a case of: out of the frying pan, into the fire.

Qualcomm tries to make friends and influence people in China

Embattled chip giant Qualcomm is so keen to acquire new allies it has held a special event in China to court its smartphone vendors.

In common with the rest of the industry it’s all about 5G this year, and for the foreseeable future, for Qualcomm. We’re already all too aware how aroused telcos’ marketing departments are at the prospect of slapping 5G on everything, on the assumption that they’ll flog loads more of it as a consequence. This trend is likely to be most conspicuous among smartphone vendors.

A lot of these are Chinese, so it makes sense for Qualcomm to make a bee-line for them, especially since the only other two of note are Samsung, which has an ambivalent chip relationship with Qualcomm, and Apple, which seems to actively despise Qualcomm. The result is the ‘5G Pioneer Initiative’, which involves Oppo, Vivo, Xiaomi, Lenovo, ZTE and Wingtech. What, no Huawei?

“5G will bring massive new opportunities to the mobile industry, and we are excited to work with these manufacturers on this 5G Pioneer Initiative,” said Cristiano Amon, president of Qualcomm. “Qualcomm Technologies has close relationships within China’s mobile and semiconductor ecosystem, and we’ll continue to work with this ecosystem to drive innovation as we move from the 3G/4G era to the 5G era.” Everyone else said stuff too, but it was more of the same. Suffice it to say they’re all pleased, excited and committed.

On top of that Lenovo, Oppo, Vivo and Xiaomi all signed a memorandum of understanding (where’s the photo? How do we know it happened unless there’s a photo of loads of people in suits standing behind a desk with a bit of paper on it?) for the multi-year purchase of RF front-end solutions.

Apparently all this MoU amounts to is a statement of intent to purchase some gear from Qualcomm, but with no obligations, so you have to wonder what the point of it is. Our guess would be that this is some bullish messaging directed at investors currently being courted by Broadcom as part of its hostile takeover bid. Lots of spokespeople said things, again.