Apple belatedly looks to refocus on podcasts

The podcasting industry was shaken up this week with the announcement that JRE is moving exclusively to Spotify and it looks like it has caught Apple’s attention.

Bloomberg reports that Apple is looking to increase its investment in original podcasts, as well as buying existing ones, to augment its nascent Apple TV+ service. While its easy to view this as a classic case of shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted, Apple seems to view podcasts as either a by-product of video content or as material that could then be adapted to video.

Apple effectively invented the podcast format, which derives its name from the pioneering iPod digital audio player, but the pre-eminence of iTunes as a podcasting platform is under serious threat thanks to this recent development. You have to assume Joe Rogan (pictured) spoke to Apple before recently committing to Spotify, so it would be fascinating to know what led him to ultimately reject it.

If hearsay from Rogan’s friend Alex Jones is to be believed, the straw that broke the camel’s back was supplied by the podcast’s other main publishing platform, YouTube. In an article that seems to have since been taken down, Summit News claimed Rogan told Jones it was YouTube’s censorship of alternative views on the coronavirus pandemic that pushed him over the edge.

According to the piece, YouTube has been actively excluding popular content from its trending lists, including some of Rogan’s biggest. On top of that, YouTube has been taking down some videos from doctors and other experts that challenge the conventional narrative on things like COVID-19 pathology and the desirability of keeping society locked down. Rogan’s move is characterised in the piece as ‘a direct strike against the culture of censorship’.

We don’t know why that piece is no longer available, but it seems unlikely that Jones would have fabricated his conversation with Rogan, even if he is often inclined towards hyperbole. Our best guess is that Rogan either didn’t intend his views to be made public or regretted it once they were, and therefore asked for the story to be taken down. The publisher, Paul Joseph Watson, has close ties to Alex Jones and both of them were banned by Facebook a year ago for being ‘dangerous’.

Back to Apple, the podcasting industry will be hoping Spotify’s move will lead to the kind of spending arms race and bidding war for talent that has characterised the video streaming industry for some time. Not only do podcasts like JRE attract massive audiences, they cost next to nothing to produce. The only catch is that the best ones are completely uncensored and thus risky for prudish publishers. Perhaps that’s ultimately what pushed Rogan away from Apple.

Major blow for Google and Apple as Rogan podcast moves exclusively to Spotify

The streaming wars have opened a major new front with the news that Spotify has lured the Joe Rogan Experience away from YouTube and iTunes.

For those unfamiliar with the JRE podcast, it is the defining long-form, open discussion show, featuring completely unstructured conversations between host Joe Rogan and usually one other guest. As a comedian and martial arts commentator, those two topics are covered frequently, but the guest list is very eclectic, ranging from academics to politicians to showbiz figures.

JRE has 8.4 million subscribers on Google-owned YouTube and while that’s a massive number it’s nowhere near the top of the list of all YouTube subscribers. But if you strip out the music and TV brands, it must be right up there. The real traffic for podcasts, however, is from audio streams and downloads, which Rogan himself estimates are around ten times greater that video views. The biggest single platform for that is probably Apple iTunes, on which JRE is the second biggest in the US.

The raw numbers only tell half the story, however, with Rogan’s cultural influence extending even further, especially in the US. US Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders used a claimed Rogan endorsement for political capital at the start of this year while, more recently, Rogan’s negative assessment of the eventual winner of the Democratic nomination, Joe Biden, sent shockwaves across the country and beyond. Most recently, his criticism of how California is handling the coronavirus lockdown seems to have made many residents consider fleeing the state.

So for Spotify to lure Rogan away from these two internet giants with a deal that will be exclusive from the start of next year is a major victory and a significant blow to its competitors. The WSJ reports that it cost Spotify $100 million, which is serious money. While that’s great news for Rogan, we will probably never know if it pays off for Spotify, but if Netflix (where you can find Rogan’s excellent standup) is anything to go by, paying for big names is the way forward.

As you may have gathered your correspondent is a big fan of JRE. At a time when public discussion seems to be more shrill, polarised and dumbed-down than ever, Rogan offers the kind of honest, nuanced, agenda-free discussion that is desperately needed. JRE fans not currently on Spotify will have some serious thinking to do at the start of the year and the Swedish streaming giant is betting a lot of the new users Rogan brings will upgrade to premium services.

The only thing that could go wrong is for Spotify to in any way try to alter the format or censor the often colourful content. Netflix hasn’t and it would be very surprising for Rogan to agree to any such interference. “While Spotify will become the exclusive distributor of JRE, Rogan will maintain full creative control over the show,” assures the Spotify announcement.

To date the streaming wars have largely focused on video content, but this move brings audio to the fore. Once people start commuting again, podcasts will be more important than ever and it increasingly looks like you need to be a Spotify user if you want access to the best ones.

Incidentally the only pod more popular than JRE in the US is currently in the middle of a drama over switching platforms. It may be no coincidence the YouTube recently lured its biggest star, PewDiePie, back from a rival platform. In these fractious times, authenticity has become a precious commodity, one that the internet giants are prepared to pay top dollar for.


Diversification helps Google ride the waves of coronavirus turbulence

Alphabet-owned Google certainly felt the pinch of COVID-19 over the last few weeks of the quarter, but CEO Sundar Pichai identified diversification as key to managing the crisis.

While few would complain when looking at the Google spreadsheets over the last three-months, it might not be living up to the milestones it has set itself in previous years. 13% year-on-year growth could be considered miserly in Google’s standards, but the coronavirus pandemic is a crisis few have experience with.

That said, investors are clearly pleased with the was Pichai and the team are managing the difficulties as share price shot up 8% during pre-market trading.

Google Q1 Financial Results (USD ($), millions)
Metric 2020 Year-on-year
Total revenues 41,159 +13%
Operating income 7,977 +20%
Net income 6,836 +3%

These are all attractive numbers, though coronavirus has inflicted a dent into the business. Pichai highlighted online advertising demand, the core revenue machine of the Alphabet group, was severely weakened from March onwards, as the full-impact of COVID-19 forced society and the economy to close doors.

Performance of individual business units (USD ($), millions)
Business Unit 2020 Year-on-year
Google Search 24,502 +8%
YouTube 4,038 +33%
Network Members’ properties 5,223 +4%
Google Cloud 2,777 +52%
Other Bets 135 -21%
Google other 4,435 +22%

In today’s world, where there is still plenty of unrealised profits in the digital economy, making money does not seem to be good enough. Investors demand high-growth year-on-year, partly due to what is available and partly because they have become used to it. This is the challenge which the likes of Google, Amazon and Facebook are facing; matching the success of yesteryear.

But in this period of uncertainty, it does appear to be a case of damage limitation. Like the financial crisis of 2008, everyone will be impacted but Google has somewhat of an advantage.

“…our business is more diversified than it was in 2008,” Pichai said during the earnings call. “For example, Cloud. In the public sector, we are helping governments delivered critical health and social services. We are supporting the state of New York, new online unemployment application system as it deals with a significant increase in demand.

“In retail, we have held Loblaw, one of Canada’s largest food retailers, and Wayfair, scale to support exponential traffic increases. We are helping communication companies adapt to new behaviour patterns. Vodafone is using Google Cloud platform to help that analyse network traffic flows to keep everyone connected, and we are helping Unity Technologies keep real time online games stay up and running.”

Google Cloud is the business unit which is perhaps profiting the most from the current crisis as more companies are forced through a digital transformation programme to embrace cloud solutions and enable workforce mobility. Some might complain about Google sinking billions into the Moonshot Labs every year, but this is the very reason why.

The more diversified revenues are, the more resilient a business is when faced with turmoil, irrelevant as to whether it is precedented or unprecedented. Google now has online advertising, cloud and video as three major sources, with plenty more bubbling away.

Over the three-month period, Alphabet CFO Ruth Porter said revenues for the Other Bets unit were $135 million, while operating loss was $1.1 billion. This might seem like a remarkable number, but these losses could eventually turn into the next Moonshot Graduate to make billions for the Group. Let’s not forget, the cloud business unit, YouTube, Maps and Android were all cultivated in these labs.

Currently in the experimental unit is Google’s self-driving car project Waymo, a delivery service using specialized drones known as Wing, life science tech unit Verily, smart city initiative Sidewalk Labs and Makani, an attempt to create renewable energy from propellers on airborne kites. Outside of these homegrown experiments, Google purchased Fitbit for $2.1 billion last year, taking it into the world of wearables.

Each quarter, the core advertising business unit brings in billions in profit, but dependence on these revenues are lessened. As the alternative revenue streams gather momentum, Google becomes more diversified and much more capable of managing global crisis’ which could cripple rival firms.

YouTube changes rules to ban 5G conspiracy talk from platform

Google-owned YouTube has altered its community guidelines to ensure all conspiracy theories which suggest 5G is the cause or an accelerator of COVID-19.

Under the previous guidelines, such content would be labelled as borderline and therefore would be removed from the recommendation engines. YouTube would stop short of eradicating the content from the platform completely, there are of course free-speech complications, but these rules have now been amended.

All content which makes claims linking 5G as a cause of the coronavirus or suggests the mobile technology somehow aids the spread of the virus will be banned from the video platform.

This might be considered a violation of rights by the idiotic conspiracy theorists or the gullible fools who would believe such dribble, but it is fake news and should be treated as such. The communications infrastructure is far too important in combatting COVID-19 and for the recovery efforts, that everything possible should be done to protect it, including tackling misinformation campaigns.

The change in approach from YouTube was perhaps inspired by a weekend which saw dozens of telecoms masts, the very communications infrastructure used by emergency services, attacked by simpletons, some of whom believed the virus was a hoax to cover-up the ill-effects of radio frequency radiation. Others believed 5G suppresses the immune the system and a few have suggested the virus is somehow using it to communicate or transfer to new hosts.

The claims are amazingly ridiculous, on par with the escapades of Spongebob Squarepants, though there are still some in society who listen and are subsequently inspired into criminal action.

Representatives of the social media fraternity are due to sit down with UK Government officials to discuss the dissemination of misinformation. This might have spurred YouTube into action, though videos on its platform which encouraged violence and vandalism would of course have gotten executives twitchy.

This of course will not be the end of the ridiculous theories which cause damage to society, and we suspect there will be other ways for the tinfoil hat army to find their daily fix of fantasy, but at least YouTube is not going to be assisting the ludicrous adventures of delusional nincompoops.

Should content fall into either of the categories below, it will now be removed from the YouTube platform.

  • Content that disputes the existence or transmission of COVID-19, as described by the WHO and local health authorities
  • If any content suggests that COVID-19 does not exist or that the symptoms are caused by 5G (or not caused by anything other than the virus) are now in violation of our policies. In addition, claims that taking the COVID-19 test will lead to contracting the virus are also in violation of our policies

YouTube to limit exposure of 5G conspiracy theories but won’t remove content

YouTube has confirmed it will reduce the exposure videos which promote 5G as some sort of cause or accelerator of the coronavirus, though its actions are somewhat limited.

Officially, the video content which makes the link between 5G and COVID-19 does not actually break community guidelines, but it will be removed from recommendation engines as it has been deemed as borderline content.

Thanks to the incorrect conspiracy theories, telecommunications infrastructure was set on fire over the course of the weekend in multiple locations. Three has confirmed at least five sites were attacked, while Vodafone has said six sites were damaged, some of which were shared infrastructure and not all of which were housing 5G base stations. BT and O2 did not respond at the time of writing.

“Our thoughts are with everyone affected by the coronavirus around the world,” a YouTube spokesperson said. “We’re committed to providing timely and helpful information at this critical time, including raising authoritative content, reducing the spread of harmful misinformation and showing information panels, using NHS and WHO data, to help combat misinformation.

“We have also begun reducing recommendations of borderline content such as conspiracy theories related to 5G and coronavirus, that could misinform users in harmful ways. We’ll continue to evaluate the impact of these videos on the UK community and look forward to continuing our work with the UK Government and the NHS to keep the British public safe and informed during this difficult time.”

While YouTube will remove this content from the recommendation engine, it is stopping short of completely removing conspiracy theories from the platform. Although these statements are quite obviously false, creating content which states such beliefs or theories are not actually in violation of YouTube’s rules.

According to YouTube, the conspiracy theories would be labelled as borderline content. This is a category of content which could misinform users in harmful ways, such as promoting miracle cures, claiming the earth is flat or making blatantly false claims about historic events. Such content accounts for less than 1% of the videos available on YouTube, and while it will remain on the platform, removing it from the recommendation engine will make it much more difficult to find.

This is the position which YouTube is currently taking, but it might well be encouraged to a more firm stance over the coming days or weeks. Aside from Government pressure, the content is linked to violence, which will get YouTube’s PR team twitchy.

Following a weekend which saw ill-informed arsonists attack dozens of masts which host critically important communications infrastructure, it was suggested Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Oliver Dowden would be speaking to social media representatives on ways in which misinformation can be combatted.

Although there is no official statement from DCMS on action moving forward, Chair of the DCMS Select Committee Julian Knight has called for more stringent action.

“To hear that crackpot theories are leading to people attacking phone masts or threatening telecom workers is sickening and it’s clearly time to act,” said Knight. “Government should work with social media companies to stamp out deliberate attempts to spread fear COVID-19.”

Considering the importance of communications infrastructure to aid society while COVID-19 is forcing a state of lockdown, but also its role in helping the economy bounce back in the future, something needs to be done. The infrastructure needs to be protected from the idiots who believe the pseudoscience and ignore statements made by who have the qualifications to make such assertions.

As YouTube defaults to SD worldwide, Ofcom offers connectivity top tips

With everyone stuck at home for the foreseeable future coz of coronavirus, telecoms capacity has become front page news.

Google-owned YouTube, the dominant social video platform for most of the world, has announced that it has set the default resolution for all video playback worldwide to standard definition. “Last week, we temporarily defaulted all videos on YouTube to standard definition in the European Union, United Kingdom, and Switzerland,” said the support update. “Given the global nature of this crisis, we are expanding that change globally starting today. This update is slowly rolling out, and users can manually adjust the video quality.”

The European move was matched by Netflix but they weren’t joking about the slow rollout. SD presumably means 480p and below, but our videos are still defaulting to 1080p in many cases. Since the UK has supposedly been restricted for a week, you have to wonder how long this fairly small concession will take to implement.

In the mean time Ofcom has published some top tips for ‘helping broadband and mobile users stay connected’. You can read them in full here, but in case you lack the bandwidth to do so here’s a summary:

  1. Use your landline or wifi calls if you can
  2. Move your router clear of other devices
  3. Lower the demands on your connection
  4. Try wired rather than wireless
  5. Plug your router directly into your main phone socket
  6. Test the speed on your broadband line
  7. Get advice from your broadband provider

“Right now we need people to stay at home to protect the NHS and save lives,” said Digital Secretary Oliver Dowden. “Reliable internet speeds will be crucial so we can work from home where possible, stay connected with our families and keep up to date with the latest health information. I urge everyone to read Ofcom’s helpful tips and advice to ensure they get the most out of their broadband and mobile internet connections during these unprecedented times.”

“Families across the country are going online together this week, often juggling work and keeping children busy at the same time,” said Melanie Dawes, Ofcom Chief Executive. “So we’re encouraging people to read our advice on getting the most from their broadband, home phones and mobiles – and to share it with friends, families and colleagues, to help them stay connected too.”

Cloud becomes the golden child as Google reports yet more profit

When looking at the financial results of companies like Google, the question is not whether it has made money, but how much are the bank vaults overflowing.

Financial for the full year demonstrated slightly slowing growth, but few should worry about having to search the sofa for the pennies right now. Over the course of 2019, Google brought in $161.8 million, up 18.3% year-on-year, though it was YouTube and the Google Cloud business units as opposed to the core business which collected the plaudits from the management team.

“Revenues were 2.6 billion for the fourth quarter, up 53% year-over-year, driven by significant growth at GCP and ongoing strong growth and G Suite,” said Alphabet CFO Ruth Porat. “The growth rate of GCP was meaningfully higher than that of cloud overall. GCP growth was led by our infrastructure offerings and our data and analytics platform.”

Company Quarter Revenue (most recent) Year-on-year Growth
Google Cloud $2.6 billion 53%
Microsoft Intelligent Cloud $11.9 billion 27%
Amazon Web Services $9.9 billion 23%

Despite being a business unit which brings in an impressive $10 billion annually, it is impossible not to compare the performance of Google Cloud to AWS and Microsoft Azure. Google is realistically the only rival which can keep pace with the leading pair, though it does appear it is losing pace.

That said, the fortunes of the cloud are only beginning to be realised; this is a marathon not a sprint. Moving forward, the Google team believes strength in AI and software gives it an advantage to provide seamless experiences to users across multiple devices. There is also the blunt force approach to acquiring market share moving forward; Porat highlighted the objective is to triple the size of the cloud sales team.

Over at YouTube, the team is capitalising on the increasingly consumer appetite for video, though also what appears to be a more experimental attitude to subscription. YouTube TV is growing healthily at 2 million, while the core YouTube platform has more than 20 million music and premium paid subscribers.

This is positive momentum, though it will be interesting to see what impact partnerships have on these figures. Google is partnered with Verizon, forming a content option in its bundled products, though rivals are placing a much greater emphasis on these relationships, leaning on an already established link with the consumer, albeit sacrificing some profit in the process.

Perhaps these two business units demonstrate why Google is such an attractive company to investors and potential employees. The core business can do what it does, but Google is always searching for the next big idea. Google Cloud is arguably the most successful graduate of its ‘Moonshot Labs’ initiative, while YouTube is one of the biggest acquisition bargains at $1.65 billion in 2006. It now brings in more than $15 billion annually in ads sales.

During the earnings call, CEO Sundar Pichai pointed to some of the other investments which are absorbing the $26 billion annual R&D budget. Verily and Calico are linking together AI and cloud technologies to improve clinical trials, research, and drug development. Waymo is attempting to scale driverless vehicles in the US. Loon is another Moonshot graduate, endeavouring to stand on its own currently.

Google is one of the most interesting companies around, not only because it is a money-making machine, but the R&D business could produce some gems over the next few years.

The US election will test social media censorship to breaking point

Electoral losers are increasingly blaming social media for their failure, but this year will demonstrate that censorship is not the answer.

Democracy only works if the losers of elections accept defeat, but sadly few are inclined to do so these days. Now we have five stages of electoral grief that are directly analogous to the original Kübler-Ross model. We still have denial, anger and depression, but instead of bargaining we have litigation and acceptance seems to have been replaced with conspiracy theories in which social media plays a central role.

The central concern is that when the electorate votes for the other team it must be because they were mislead in some way, because no rational, fully informed person could fail to recognise the superiority of my team. In the past some blame could be attached to the mainstream media, something the UK Labour party still persists with. In the US, however, Donald Trump’s victory in 2016 despite having the support of no major media, would appear to render that theory obsolete.

Trump was able to prevail because politicians are no longer dependent on the old media to communicate directly with the electorate, thanks to social media. But this significantly lowered barrier to entry into the public sphere also provides fertile ground for electoral losers searching for mitigation and another bite at the cherry.

A favourite on both sides of the pond is to blame ‘the Russians’. While cold war fervour largely shifted its focus to China, Russia remains a strong source of bogeymen. Now it should be noted that there is plenty of evidence of social media bot farms originating from a number of countries, including Russia, that apparently seek to meddle in elections. What is much harder to prove is whether they had any effect on the outcome of elections whatsoever.

The small matter of evidence is never going to stand in the way of those refusing to concede defeat, however, and it has now become conventional wisdom that social media censorship is vital if we are to ever have untainted elections again. Since the US is in the middle of another of its interminable general election campaigns this year, the heat is being turned up on social media and they are being forced to respond.

Last week Twitter announced it was ‘turning on a tool for key moments of the 2020 US election that enables people to report misleading information about how to participate in an election or other civic event.’ The tweet implies the tool has a broader purpose than that, though, as it also includes intimidation and misrepresenting of political affiliation. Already you can see how a simple censorship objective becomes immediately and massively complicated under the weight of interpretation, semantics and generally chasing its tail.

Then you have Google and its subsidiary YouTube blogging about how much they ‘support’ elections, whatever that’s supposed to mean. Again a lot of this focuses on content that is intended to mislead voters, but since electioneering is biased by definition, surely all of it is intended to mislead to some extent. YouTube also reiterates its aim to promote ‘authoritative’ voices, which is code for establishment media and commentariat.

In contrast, Facebook Founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg is increasingly pushing back on censorship, having tried and failed to walk that tightrope since the Cambridge Analytica scandal. Perhaps motivated by the prospect of an extra four years of Trump, who has made his feelings known on censorship, Zuckerberg is now turning all free speech absolutist on us. Whether that position will survive even the first engagement of the US electoral process remains highly debatable, however.

Early signs of the immense pressure these platform owners will come under are already appearing, with the Democrats mobilising supposed experts to ‘protect’ the electoral process. “Iowa’s first-in-the-nation caucus will mark the DNC’s greatest challenge so far in efforts to guard its presidential contenders from the same fate that befell Hillary Clinton in 2016 when her campaign was upended by a Russian-backed hacking and disinformation effort,” reports the Washington Post in depressingly partisan fashion.

If that WaPo piece is anything to go by everyone is going to be trying to manipulate not only the US Presidential election, but the Democratic primaries too, where non-establishment candidate Bernie Sanders is currently the front-runner. Presumably YouTube doesn’t intend to punish the country’s mainstream media for misleading the electorate, so it seems it will support democracy by censoring everyone else.

As ever, censoring free societies is a game of whack-a-mole, in which policy-making can never hope to keep up with the desire of its people to say what they want. Even if the social media companies are successful in their stated censorship objectives, which they won’t be, the team that loses will still blame them. So they might as well not bother and trust their users to sort the wheat from the chaff. Afterall, they’ve been doing that with mainstream media for years.

Twitter tries to find another way to solve the censorship dilemma

Social media giant Twitter is exploring the creation of an open standard that it hopes will provide the answer to the impossible question of censorship.

As you would expect the announcement was made by Twitter CEO via a tweet in which he announced the creation of a small team to develop an open and decentralized standard for social media. In the thread he cites some of the inspiration for the move as coming from an essay entitled ‘Protocols, Not Platforms: A Technological Approach to Free Speech’. The author of that essay has already written an article cautiously welcoming this move.

Right now all social media are siloed platforms providing their own technology and rules. That means they’re also in the impossible position of trying to censor the stuff their users publish in order to please other users as well as advertisers and regulators. Right now they face constant pressure from all three and, of course, can never please all of the people all of the time.

At the core of the dilemma, as the essay implies, is free speech and its opposite: censorship. Determining what speech is good and bad is inherently subjective and an impossible tightrope to walk. We have long argued that any attempt to do so is futile and that the best solution for social media platforms would be to throw themselves at the mercy of regulators, thus absolving themselves of responsibility for censorship decisions.

This move by Twitter seems to be an early investigation into the possibility of an alternative resolution by creating a basic social media protocol, of which it would by just one of the clients, that could serve as the foundation for a number of other platforms. All social traffic would take place over this protocol, but then individual platforms could implement their own unique rules about what content they allowed to be published.

It’s very early days and there are all kinds of reasons why it may never take off, but it seems like a step in the right direction. Right now social media companies are being regulated like platforms but as they increasingly curate the content they host are acting more like publishers. Unless they find a way of resolving this conundrum themselves, state authorities will end up doing it for them,

As if to illustrate the point YouTube has announced yet another update to its harassment policy, including ‘a stronger stance against threats and personal attacks’. This amounts to a ban on ‘veiled or implied threats’, ‘demeaning language that goes too far’ and ‘content that maliciously insults someone based on protected attributes’.

On the surface who could have a problem with action against threatening, demeaning and insulting speech, right? It’s only when you try to establish the precisely when speech crosses any of those lines that you see what a futile, subjective and censorious policy this is. Expect a further update within months after some one claims to be upset about something and then another soon after that. You never know, eventually YouTube might come around to this protocol business.

Android moves to replace Google Pay music app with YouTube Music

Google wants to make YouTube the default audio app on Android in the hope of boosting its chances of competing with Spotify.

Right now the default Android audio app is Google Play Music, which does try to get users to upgrade to Google’s subscription streaming service, but doesn’t do a very good job of it and is mainly used as the interface for accessing locally stored audio files. Rather than overhaul the way that upsell is managed Google has decided to merge it with the YouTube Music app.

Music videos are arguably the most popular type of content on YouTube, with the top 30 most viewed individual videos dominated by music. YouTube monetizes those via serving ads on the video, but it would rather people paid upfront to its premium subscription service, that offers ad-free playback, background play on mobile devices (without it the music disappears if you switch to another app) and even downloading.

YouTube premium has plenty of features, but Spotify is the incumbent streaming music service, so Google has to do something special to topple it. As politicians, regulators and anti-trust authorities around the world are increasingly sensitive to, in Android Google has an incredible powerful platform for upselling its other digital products and services and it seems to have decided YouTube Premium needs the power of Android to give it critical mass.

YouTube Music is your personal guide through the complete world of music—whether it’s a hot new song, hard to find gem, or an unmissable music video,” says the announcement, tellingly published on the YouTube blog. “Music fans on Android phones can now easily unlock the magic of YouTube Music, which will come installed on all new devices launching with Android 10 (and Android 9), including the Pixel series.”

The announcement also made it clear that Google Play Music will no longer be preinstalled, which seems like a precursor to it being replaced entirely. You can still access locally stored files through YouTube Music, but on first inspection the user interface is inferior to Google Play Music, so the company may face some push-back from users on that. We’ll leave you with the top 5 music videos ever on YouTube, bafflingly headed by the entirely mundane Despacito. Contrastingly Gangnam Style has lost none of its kitsch, tongue-in-cheek charm.